Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: themes of Thomas Hardy`s novels.

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1

    themes of Thomas Hardy`s novels.

    could anyone give me some instructions?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    202
    This thread is pathetic.

  3. #3
    biting writer
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    when it is not pc, philly
    Posts
    2,184
    Instructions? I am not a huge Hardy enthusiast. He and Dickens somehow go together in my mind as an obligation rather than a pleasure, but sympathetic scholars say Hardy was influenced by Impressionism.

    Instructions on what, how to find themes in Hardy's work? Could you spell this out in an intelligible sentence?

  4. #4
    Really Jozzany? I totally agree with Dickens as an obligation (though I know others wouldn't) but not Hardy. Certainly with Tess and Jude anyway, I must admit to the feeling that the other Hardy novels are in no way up to the standard set in these two.

    As the (non) question I can only suggest that you read the book set and pick out any themes, you know issues - things that you think important, and write about them

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    3,093
    Hardy was heavily influenced by Schopenhauer (to see how, read Bryan Magee's book on that great philosopher.) That might help you find some philosophical themes to look for - pessimism, atheism, intractability of nature, impossibility of fulfilled love,... Why don't you find Hardy a pleasure Jozanny? I actually do find him a pleasure, but don't expect the kind of pleasure you get from fruit & jelly... or Dickens...

  6. #6
    Registered User janesmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    North Wales UK
    Posts
    551
    I am also a Hardy enthusiast. Totally concur with the previous post but you could also consider the Darwinian perspective in relation to his novels. I focused on Darwin's theory of Sexual Selection and biological discourses of sexuality in relation to Hardy's later fiction during MA study. Fascinating.

  7. #7
    biting writer
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    when it is not pc, philly
    Posts
    2,184
    Isn't fruit and jelly a bit redundant mal? To channel Petrarch's Love, whose articulate posts are no doubt buried under her business, one cannot know everything, and I never studied Hardy to any great extent, so I cannot really critique for good or ill, but I have never really gotten into him independently under my own steam. Whatever his merits, his diction plods heavily over things that a realist like Zola would just describe as sex uncaring of consequence. Some writers can really make me care about the rural/working/underclass. Gaskell comes to mind. Zola too, but Hardy just doesn't make it work for me, that Jude, for instance, cannot better himself and break the bonds of his caste because he needs to make love. Eh.

    My family sprang from the Italian working class, and my father, despite 3 wives and five children, Americanized and made upper middle class. In other words, Hardy's melodrama doesn't really authenticate for me--and I guess that is a lot to surmise from my memory and the few chapters I have plowed in my maturity--but, as I've indicated, he is a blank spot whose reputation precedes him.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,206

    Cool This poster is obviously a student ....

    looking for a free ride. Looking for themes can be easily accomplished on Wikipedia. There is enough info there without delving into abstruse philosophers.

    My feeling is that there is a large hole in your reading to leave out two such important novelists as Dickens or Hardy. Everyone should read 4 or 5 of their novels. You say why waste my time? I have found that if I have a feeling of animosity toward a writer, getting to know him or her by reading their best, decreases this feeling. Many authors are an acquired interest. To like them, you have to read them. Only the genuises among us can appreciate and like Shakespeare at the first reading. If you say something like I just can't get into him, you'll be missing a great portion of western literature.

  9. #9
    But in defence of Jozanny, I don't think it at all likely on any level that she is dismissing these writers based upon a short cursory read - with the "problem" being that she has not given them a "good try". Rather her reasons, like mine with Dickens, are more substantial than that.

    I agree with your point about the student though, which is why my in my initial second paragraph I was trying to be genuinely helpful, if in a rather blunt manner.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,206

    Cool You don't need to defend anyone ....

    because I'm not attacking anyone. I'm only saying that two such important authors such as Dickens and Hardy, if unread, will leave a gap in your literary achievements. I absolutely abhor Virginia Woolf, but I forced myself to read To the Lighthouse. Perhaps to know the enemy better.

  11. #11
    Of Subatomic Importance Quark's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,368
    Quote Originally Posted by dfloyd View Post
    This poster is obviously a student .... looking for a free ride.
    What does a "free ride" mean, dfloyd? I think they're just looking for directions to take on a paper, or maybe just things to look for while reading. Telling them that that Hardy frequently comments on art, sexuality, and history in his novels (oh, no! I said it) isn't going to write them a paper or read them the book. It's hardly a "free ride." It's just a suggestion. I love the Scrooge-like joy posters take in denying poor students help with their work.


    "Hardy's themes? Bah, humbug!"

    That being said, I wish obvious fishing for hw suggestions would get shuffled to the homework section of the forum. If book club discussions are going to get removed from the "General Literature" forum, I would hope this would be, too.
    Last edited by Quark; 04-28-2010 at 11:59 AM.
    "Par instants je suis le Pauvre Navire
    [...] Par instants je meurs la mort du Pecheur
    [...] O mais! par instants"

    --"Birds in the Night" by Paul Verlaine (1844-1896). Join the discussion here: http://www.online-literature.com/for...5&goto=newpost

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by dfloyd View Post
    because I'm not attacking anyone. I'm only saying that two such important authors such as Dickens and Hardy, if unread, will leave a gap in your literary achievements. I absolutely abhor Virginia Woolf, but I forced myself to read To the Lighthouse. Perhaps to know the enemy better.
    I'm not saying you were attacking her or anyone, but you suggested she hadn't read Dickens or Hardy which is inaccurate. I hardly think someone of Jozanny's standard is going to allow for such a gap, the suggestion is absurd...

    Oh, I'm sort of currently reading To the Lighthouse by the way, ha, ha...
    Last edited by LitNetIsGreat; 04-28-2010 at 01:33 PM.

  13. #13
    rat in a strange garret Whifflingpin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    On the hill overlooking the harbour
    Posts
    2,546
    Nostalgia - the passing of a way of life. We always refer to "Hardy's Wessex" but it was really "Hardy's father's Wessex" that he was generally describing.
    Voices mysterious far and near,
    Sound of the wind and sound of the sea,
    Are calling and whispering in my ear,
    Whifflingpin! Why stayest thou here?

  14. #14
    Registered User kiki1982's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Saarburg, Germany
    Posts
    3,105
    I don't believe in atheism and Hardy. Rather in frustration with hypocrisy. There is a fine line between being anti-institutional and anti-faith. Hardy stopped writing because of being misunderstood.

    On Dickens, I am one of the non-Dickens-fans as well. I haven't got a problem with reading and seeing themes as such, I only am not able to finish whatsoever by him apart from Bozz, it's probably because it is short.
    Hardy though... is nice only for his writing. Dickens is just...easy and too direct, there is nothing to discover. If I want descriptions I can consult Doré and his drawings about the London slums any time. I do not need pages and pages full of it without purpose. Sorry. Les Misérables is also about misery, but it is much much much more. Dickens is no more. I found A Christmas Carol fun to read when I was early in my 5th year of English and had to read my first ever book. Now I think back and I believe it must have been because I didn't understand half of it. Understood the main parts and that was it. That is where he is good, the rest is, to me, pointless. Which cannot be said about Hardy.

    But why are we discussing Dickens in a Hardy-thread, which is, admittedly, a little too much non-concealed?
    One has to laugh before being happy, because otherwise one risks to die before having laughed.

    "Je crains [...] que l'âme ne se vide à ces passe-temps vains, et que le fin du fin ne soit la fin des fins." (Edmond Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac, Acte III, Scène VII)

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    202
    Quote Originally Posted by kiki1982 View Post
    But why are we discussing Dickens in a Hardy-thread, which is, admittedly, a little too much non-concealed?
    Because if we discuss Hardy, then we help this hapless high school student ;-)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. D.H. Lawrence's Short Stories Thread
    By Virgil in forum Lawrence, D.H.
    Replies: 3248
    Last Post: 12-26-2011, 09:27 AM
  2. Favourite fantasy/sci-fi novels!
    By EAP in forum General Literature
    Replies: 116
    Last Post: 10-04-2011, 01:58 PM
  3. The Works Of Thomas Pynchon
    By AbdoRinbo in forum General Literature
    Replies: 151
    Last Post: 04-27-2011, 06:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •