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Thread: Shakespeare and the Mystery of Three: Loves Labour’s Lost

  1. #1
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    Shakespeare and the Mystery of Three: Loves Labour’s Lost

    I have a question that maybe someone out there can help me answer... I actually posted this on my Website, but wondering if anyone else noticed:

    "Here is my question, why is Shakespeare’s “Loves Labour’s Lost” so fixcated on the number “Three”? Three for example is mentioned only 8 times in both Romeo and Juliet, and Julius Caeser. Three is mentioned merely 9 time’s in Shakespeare’s longest play Hamlet. Macbeth has an unlucky 13 mentions. And Yet in Loves Labour’s Lost three is mentioned 47 times! Why?"

    The full article is found here: http://marylandshakespeare.com/2010/...-labours-lost/

    Thanks
    Jamiie
    Http://MarylandShakespeare.com

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    Registered User Beewulf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arkhamsouth View Post
    I have a question that maybe someone out there can help me answer... I actually posted this on my Website, but wondering if anyone else noticed:

    "Here is my question, why is Shakespeare’s “Loves Labour’s Lost” so fixcated on the number “Three”? Three for example is mentioned only 8 times in both Romeo and Juliet, and Julius Caeser. Three is mentioned merely 9 time’s in Shakespeare’s longest play Hamlet. Macbeth has an unlucky 13 mentions. And Yet in Loves Labour’s Lost three is mentioned 47 times! Why?"
    I think the simplest answer is that the there are three sets of lovers in the play, three men and three women. Also, the title is three words long. Moreover, since classical times, it has been argued that there are three types of love: eros, profane or erotic love; philos, or brotherly love; and agape, spiritual love. During the course of the play, the characters in LLL enact or experience all three types of love. If you looked at the overall structure of the play, I bet you'd see this triune pattern repeated.

  3. #3

    old thread new iidea

    Hi.

    old thread, but perhaps someone's interested in this answer:

    All literature comes down to three things: an alphabet, learning and that which is called Muse.


    The number three in L L L:


    Consider the old 24 letter alphabet, as 3 by 8 table:

    1 2 3
    A B C DEFGH
    I K L MNOPQ
    R S T VWXYZ

    notice under column 3 are three letters CLT

    In this alphabet they are at positions C (3) L (11) and T (19)

    their sum being 33.

    The letter L in Greek, is an inverted Roman V. ****

    If the Greek is replaced by the Roman, then the three letters are CVT, or, to wriite them in another way: CUT.

    What is CUT? Shy lock has the answer. Thus his own use of three.

    By the way: if L was 11, what does L + L + L make?

    Also: Three die at the end of Romeo and Iuliet (Romeo, Iuliet and Paris) their
    initials are R. I . P, where R was 17, I was 9 and P was 15, what is that sum?

    ================================================== =====

    **** Note:

    The letter L in Greek, is an inverted Roman V:

    see Ben Jonson's phrase "Small Latine" and "Lesse Greeke".

    Consider the words: sound them (ref Julius Caesar): LESSE EL ESS

    S when turned by 180 degrees is still S.

    L in Greek form is still L.

    L turned by 90 degrees is very much like Greek L, but is less than Greek.

    S---ma----LL L---atin L---e---SS Greeke

    The reason why Jonson used phrases like "half-sword" is to point to the new word CUT.

    Bearing in mind that a CVT can KIL:

    Look again at the first three columns of the table, but cut out all except 3 by 3:

    - 1 2 3
    1 A B C
    2 I K L
    3 R S T

    read the first three letters down: AIR
    read 3 letters from 3 down and 3 across: A R T
    read 3 down 3 across: AIR ST or STAIR (to learning)

    If Roman I was 1, and A is 1, then I = A, and I STAR becomes A STAR

    or, in graphic form:

    A
    I
    R S T


    Which is a key, to what I call Love's Labours Found. Now cut out the L:

    R----S----T

    I-----K

    A


    A man called Sir Francis Bacon once used the word KAY when talking about a cipher key.

    The letter K sounds like kay. Ask --- F --- Bacon about his K.


    You did ask.

    regards
    Last edited by mike thomas; 07-15-2010 at 08:19 PM. Reason: spacing problems - had to insert ---- to compensate

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