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Thread: Vernacular quiz for non brits.

  1. #1
    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Vernacular quiz for non brits.

    There was a thread the other day related to English vernacular & I cast around for a few more examples. See how you do.

    I'm plumb tuckered.

    I'm knackered.

    Sloshed.

    Six parts to the wind.

    Half cut.

    Got the hump.

    Its a syrup and fig.

    Half a mo.

    Naff off. (Royal connotations)

    In the club.

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    I will have a go with a few. Someone please tell me if I'm correct


    I'm plumb tuckered: I'm exhausted/extremely tired (I understand it has an American origin and in its full it would be "I'm plumb tuckered out")

    I'm knackered: I'm extremely tired.

    Sloshed: very drunk.

    Half a mo: half a month (though mo is also an abbreviation for moment, right?)

    Naff off: a forceful expression of dismissal or contempt.

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    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Maximilianus
    Excellent. 5 out of 10.
    "tuckered' Its obsolete English from 1833 & you are right, its normally "tuckered out"
    "mo" we normally use for "moment"
    "Naff off". Famously used by Princess Anne when pursued by the media at a show jumping event, she came off her mount & let loose at them.

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    Manichaen - I've never heard 'plumb tuckered' used in UK. I've heard it used in Australia, though.

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    Registered User prendrelemick's Avatar
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    The only one I don't know is "its a syrup and fig"

    Is it anything to do with the bowel loosening properties of syrup of figs?

    Also, we would say, "three sheets to the wind" rather than "six parts to the wind" for someone considered a bit mad.

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    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Must have been from my days in a bed sit in Earls Court!

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    Internal nebulae TheFifthElement's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prendrelemick View Post
    The only one I don't know is "its a syrup and fig"

    I'll give you a clue: it's cockney rhyming slang.

    Manichaean - could you add:

    - chunnering, and
    - mithering

    to your list? I bet some of our southern counterparts might not know what those mean!
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    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Prendrelemick

    Since when did you become a non Brit?

    "Syrup & fig" / "Wig"

    Interesting interpretation of wind force!

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    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prendrelemick View Post
    The only one I don't know is "its a syrup and fig"

    Is it anything to do with the bowel loosening properties of syrup of figs?

    Also, we would say, "three sheets to the wind" rather than "six parts to the wind" for someone considered a bit mad.
    Yeah we'd say three sheets to the wind over here too. I dont know syrup and fig. But then i dont know cockney
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    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Actually, it is 'syrup of figs'...


    It was a common expression in South London when I was a kid, and I think it still is.

    We had history teacher who, having explained the background to the dissolution of the monasteries, said, "Any questions?"

    My mate Pete raised his hand and said, "Yes sir. Is that a syrup, or what?"


    Quote Originally Posted by Niamh View Post
    Yeah we'd say three sheets to the wind over here too. I dont know syrup and fig. But then i dont know cockney
    Fifth Element

    This southern counterpart does not know.

    Can I take a guess. Is "chunnering" something to do with bowel movements or being physically sick?

    "Mithering" Have not got a clue!

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    Jethro BienvenuJDC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MANICHAEAN View Post
    Six parts to the wind.
    I've also heard this as "three sheets to the wind"...

    EDIT: I guess I'm a little late with this comment...LOL...
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    Registered User prendrelemick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MANICHAEAN View Post
    Prendrelemick

    Since when did you become a non Brit?
    Give up mithering!

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    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Got it. I think.
    Nagging, scolding,pestering,annoying,fussing.
    Scottish varient: mothering?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MANICHAEAN View Post
    Maximilianus
    Excellent. 5 out of 10.
    "tuckered' Its obsolete English from 1833 & you are right, its normally "tuckered out"
    "mo" we normally use for "moment"
    "Naff off". Famously used by Princess Anne when pursued by the media at a show jumping event, she came off her mount & let loose at them.
    Thanks for every explanation

    Quote Originally Posted by kasie View Post
    Manichaen - I've never heard 'plumb tuckered' used in UK. I've heard it used in Australia, though.
    This is a very interesting link explaining its origin.

    Quote Originally Posted by MANICHAEAN View Post
    Can I take a guess. Is "chunnering" something to do with bowel movements or being physically sick?
    The Urban Dictionary gives this for chunnering: "when someone keeps going on and on about something that no one else is really interested in". And it gives the following example: "Mikylie kept chunnering on about how exciting his lan parties were and he met females there".

    I also found "chunner" to be a synonym for "moron"

    This thread is fantastic. It's really expanding my vocab
    Last edited by Maximilianus; 03-16-2010 at 03:43 AM.

  15. #15
    Internal nebulae TheFifthElement's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maximilianus View Post
    The Urban Dictionary gives this for chunnering: "when someone keeps going on and on about something that no one else is really interested in". And it gives the following example: "Mikylie kept chunnering on about how exciting his lan parties were and he met females there".

    I also found "chunner" to be a synonym for "moron"
    Well done Max! Though I do like Manichaean's definition
    Quote Originally Posted by MANICHAEAN View Post
    Can I take a guess. Is "chunnering" something to do with bowel movements or being physically sick?
    which expresses quite nicely what it's like when someone is chunnering on!

    Quote Originally Posted by MANICHAEAN View Post
    Got it. I think.
    Nagging, scolding,pestering,annoying,fussing.
    Scottish varient: mothering?
    I don't know about the Scottish variant, but mithering is a word often used by mothers in relation to their kids...'will you stop mithering!'

    It is also used to express when you can't be bothered with something, 'I can't really be mithered' or 'I'm not mithered'.

    Okay, a common word in UK but maybe not overseas, how about: butty?
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