Page 1 of 22 12345611 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 324

Thread: Poetry Reading Group Redux- Nominations

  1. #1
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The USA... or thereabouts
    Posts
    6,076
    Blog Entries
    78

    Poetry Reading Group Redux- Nominations

    Here is the chance to nominate a couple of poets or poetry compilations for consideration for more in-depth reading by those interested. Limit your nominations to 3 works/collections. Try to chose something you have not read but have wanted to read (or something you haven't read in great depth). Consider how difficult the work nominated will be to come by by the group as a whole. In nominating a collection such as the collected works of Yeats we can always choose a few poems to focus upon. You may wish to add a few details about the poets you nominate. After a given period of time (shall we say 1 week... less?) we'll hold a vote in which we each choose our top 3 choices eliminating all but a few works. The selection will come from a final round of voting.

    My first 2 nominations are:

    Michael Drayton- Nimphidia, the Court of Faery

    Thomas Lovell Beddoes- Selected Poems

    Both authors are available on the internet. I read part of the Drayton poem some years ago and nothing by Beddoes.
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
    My Blog: Of Delicious Recoil
    http://stlukesguild.tumblr.com/

  2. #2
    Bibliophile JBI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,358
    I'll nominate this one: http://www.amazon.com/Book-Songs-Anc...6298170&sr=8-4

    And this one: http://www.amazon.com/Butterflys-Bur...6298388&sr=1-1

    And as a third a preferably Elizabethan or nevertheless early translation of Petrarch's Canzoniere.

  3. #3
    Asa Nisi Masa mayneverhave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    732
    I'll nominate two volumes of poetry I have recently (yesterday!) purchased but have not yet read:

    - Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair: Pablo Neruda
    - Les Fleurs du mal: Charles Baudelaire

    Hardly unheard of selections (with two threads already floating around on French and Spanish poetry), but both are relatively modern and famous.

    Would also not mind Il Canzoniere.

  4. #4
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Coventry, West Midlands
    Posts
    6,363
    Blog Entries
    36
    I'd like to nominate Lorca:

    http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets...ia_lorca/poems

    and Robert Graves:

    http://www.poemhunter.com/robert-graves/

    I'd be happy to do any of the above though.

  5. #5
    Registered User quasimodo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bensalem, PA 19020
    Posts
    3,267
    Three collections: Jackstraws: Poems by Charles Simic / Search Party: Collected Poems by William Matthews / Telephone Ringing in the Labyrinth: Poems by Adrienne Rich

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    3,093
    Timon of Athens - Shakespeare

    Purgatory - Dante

    Goethe - Faust (part 1)

  7. #7
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The USA... or thereabouts
    Posts
    6,076
    Blog Entries
    78
    For my 3rd choice I'll nominate the selected poems of the Russian, Marina Svetaeva.
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
    My Blog: Of Delicious Recoil
    http://stlukesguild.tumblr.com/

  8. #8
    Giacomo Leopardi
    Theophile Gautier

    Ill forward these two. Both of them have been on my to do list for too long and should be easily available on the internet for all. I dont have any particular collections or poems in mind, but if one of them did come out Im sure that we could agree upon a few choice pieces. Originally, I wanted to forward some Eastern poets, something a little further afield, something Chinese, Persian/Arabic but to be honest I wouldnt know where to even start here properly. However, I would be happy to read whatever is suggested though I think easy, immediate access as in the internet has to be a factor so all can get to the material easily.

    (I can certainly sympathise with Macs suggestion of Purgatory but I think length is an issue for most people too, unless extracts were involved. Maybe another thread, another time, would be a good idea for that one I know Id certainly like to go over Dante sometime in a little more depth anyway.)

  9. #9
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Coventry, West Midlands
    Posts
    6,363
    Blog Entries
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by JBI View Post
    I'll nominate this one: http://www.amazon.com/Book-Songs-Anc...6298170&sr=8-4

    And this one: http://www.amazon.com/Butterflys-Bur...6298388&sr=1-1

    And as a third a preferably Elizabethan or nevertheless early translation of Petrarch's Canzoniere.
    Hi JBI
    Do you mind me asking where your interest in Classical Chinese poetry comes from?

  10. #10
    Bibliophile JBI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,358
    Quote Originally Posted by Paulclem View Post
    Hi JBI
    Do you mind me asking where your interest in Classical Chinese poetry comes from?
    I study Chinese, but beyond that, once you begin to understand it, you realize it is a very interesting area of literature, certainly as if not more interesting than any other number of traditions that get too much discussion time here.

    Really though, you have to read it to understand, and that translation I recommended seems to be very accessible for English, especially since it is early 詩 poetry, and therefore more simple folk poetry than elaborate literati poetry.

  11. #11
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Coventry, West Midlands
    Posts
    6,363
    Blog Entries
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by JBI View Post
    I study Chinese, but beyond that, once you begin to understand it, you realize it is a very interesting area of literature, certainly as if not more interesting than any other number of traditions that get too much discussion time here.

    Really though, you have to read it to understand, and that translation I recommended seems to be very accessible for English, especially since it is early 詩 poetry, and therefore more simple folk poetry than elaborate literati poetry.
    That's interesting. My wife tried Chinese at her uni, but didn't get on with it. She's good at German and French. My kids both like Japanese, and the lad has applied to study it at Uni. I'm afraid I'm virtually monolingual though.

    Chinese could be a good language to acquire with the opportunities China offers these days. My work colleague has a Chinese wife, and when they were visiting relatives in the summer they were both offered work in language schools. Lucrative too.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Nightingale Island
    Posts
    28
    1. Poetry of Robert Browning; any of his poems may do. I've been meaning to study him for a while.

    2. Any of Percy B. Shelley's work. I've not delved into him either, but really wish to.
    Look, you con man, make a living out of your death.

    -E. Hemingway

  13. #13
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The USA... or thereabouts
    Posts
    6,076
    Blog Entries
    78
    Oooh! A couple of interesting suggestions. I love Gautier's tales, but haven't read many of his poems... yet I recently found an on-line translation of his Enamels and Cameos. Robert Browning is also an interesting suggestion... someone I was just thinking that I have barely read myself... although he may certainly not be as unknown to others.
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
    My Blog: Of Delicious Recoil
    http://stlukesguild.tumblr.com/

  14. #14
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The USA... or thereabouts
    Posts
    6,076
    Blog Entries
    78
    JBI... what have you come across among Elizabethan of other early translations of Petrarch? I know of the Wyatt and Chaucer translation of a few pieces... but little else.
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
    My Blog: Of Delicious Recoil
    http://stlukesguild.tumblr.com/

  15. #15
    Alea iacta est. mortalterror's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    LA
    Posts
    1,905
    Blog Entries
    39
    Neruda, Baudelaire, and Leopardi all sound great to me.
    "So-Crates: The only true wisdom consists in knowing that you know nothing." "That's us, dude!"- Bill and Ted
    "This ain't over."- Charles Bronson
    Feed the Hungry!

Page 1 of 22 12345611 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Light in August - reading group
    By Zee. in forum General Literature
    Replies: 96
    Last Post: 04-15-2012, 09:59 AM
  2. I need to know!
    By kels21 in forum Who Said That?
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-06-2006, 06:46 PM
  3. Great Reading Group book
    By Debra in forum The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-14-2006, 07:09 PM
  4. Valentine's Day Reading Nominations
    By Scheherazade in forum Forum Book Club
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 01-25-2006, 01:14 PM
  5. Halloween Reading Nominations
    By Scheherazade in forum Forum Book Club
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 09-28-2005, 07:35 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •