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Thread: The LitNet Forum Game Quiz o' the Week

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by DickZ View Post
    I can well imagine they are very time-consuming to write, as I've tried to come up with some myself and have failed miserably. Mine had nothing like the creativity and imagination that yours always have. I would certainly understand if you abandoned the project and turned your attention to other efforts.
    Thanks, DickZ, for your opinion. I'll wait to see if anyone wants to weigh in with their preferences about the quizzies. If enough LitNutters say they like them, I'll keep doing them, and if no one else replies, I'll have my answer.

  2. #122
    aspiring Arthurianist Wilde woman's Avatar
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    Auntie, I have great fun doing your weekly quizzes. I'd be sad to see them go, but I understand can only imagine how much time you put into them. Like Dick, I'll understand if you decide to nix 'em. But perhaps you'd consider doing some for special occasions, like holidays? I rather like the holiday-themed ones.

    I'll be back to look at this last quiz.
    Ecce quam bonum et jocundum, habitares libros in unum!
    ~Robert Greene, Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay

  3. #123
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    So I'll bump this latest one while movies are in the news today. If there are a sufficient number of hits, I'll decide whether to revive it, put it on "hiatus" (a euphemism in the TV industry) or put it out of its misery.

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    Lucky Sevens

    Aw, what the hell. . .

    Now that it’s March and the Luck o’ the Irish is just around the corner, here’s a quickie in which each of the answers contain the word “seven,” which is also a number that’s supposedly lucky (or so I'm told.) Without further blarney, shake your rabbit’s foot, look for that 4-leafed shamrock and take a chance on this week’s snorefest, which we like to call

    Lucky Sevens

    1. What is the title of the autobiographical work by T. E. Lawrence, better known as “Lawrence of Arabia”?

    2. Kurosawa’s masterpiece of 1954, a highly-influential movie about a septet of warriors who attempt to save a farming village under siege, was Americanized and remade as The Magnificent Seven. What was the original title of this film?

    3. What is the common term for the potentially “lethal” vices and human failings discussed at length by, among others, St. Thomas Aquinas?

    4. Which majestic city of antiquity – still a thriving metropolis – was built on seven hills?

    5. You can bet that the characters in a play by Aeschylus were far from lucky, but what is the title of this Greek tragedy about a war waged by brothers in order to regain the throne of an ancient city-state?

    6. Name the collective phrase describing tourist attractions noted by Hellenistic travelers in a list that included the Pyramids in Egypt, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Colossus of Rhodes, and four others.

    7. Finally, Nicholas Meyer adapted his own novel about Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson and their encounter with Sigmund Freud as way to cure a secret addiction. Name this critically acclaimed movie of 1976.


    BONUS!– Not a question, but an added attraction just for those hardy LitNutters kind enough to click on this thread. Here’s a cute little video that might help us get our minds off this seemingly endless winter.


    Answers
    1. The Seven Pillars of Wisdom
    2. The Seven Samurai
    3. The Seven Deadly Sins
    4. Rome
    5. Seven Against Thebes
    6. The Seven Wonders of the (Ancient) World
    7. The Seven Per Cent Solution

  5. #125
    Registered User Disagree's Avatar
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    I got 4 out of 7 correct.

    <--- Me.


    Quote Originally Posted by AuntShecky View Post
    BONUS!– Not a question, but an added attraction just for those hardy LitNutters kind enough to click on this thread. Here’s a cute little video that might help us get our minds off this seemingly endless winter.
    Heh, thanks for that video.

  6. #126
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    Among the myriad products of Einstein’s celebrated brain comes the oft-quoted description of insanity as doing the same thing the same way while expecting a different result. Here we have an illustration of that famous definition with yet another quizzical equation. Following the previous quiz with the sevens, this one features questions and/or answers all concerned with the number
    “8.” So at the risk of the M.P. seizing yours fooly to be drummed out via a “Section 8,” here’s this week’s derangement which we like to call

    “Crazy Eights”

    1. Originating in the game of pool, what’s the common phrase for a perilous situation in which the affected person can’t extricate himself?

    2. In his early years, he was the author of a tract defending a religion which he later denounced both in his official policy and in his private life which was marked by serial monogamy. Name this monarch.

    3. What is the “timely” title of the following 1922 poem by A. E. Housman?:

    He stood, and heard the steeple
    Sprinkle the quarters on the morning town.
    One, two, three, four, to market-place and people
    It tossed them down.

    Strapped, noosed nighing his hour,
    He stood and counted them and cursed his luck;
    And then the clock collected in the tower
    Its strength, and struck.


    4. Legends and lore tell about buried pirate treasure which allegedly included large quantities of old Spanish silver dollars called by which colloquial term?

    5. What was the title of Fellini’s 1963 semi-autobiographical masterpiece, rich with both realistic and hallucinogenic scenes?

    6. The terms octave, octet, and ottava rima all pretty much mean the same thing, which is what?

    7. What is the term for a particular book size formed by folding a sheet of printer’s paper three times to make 8 leaves or 16 pages?

    8. Finally, name the 1988 John Sayles work about the World Series of 1919, “thrown” by the infamous Chicago “Black Sox” and starred an ensemble cast including, among others, John Cusack, D.B. Sweeney, the director himself as Ring Lardner, and a very young and much subdued Charlie Sheen.


    Answers:

    1. Behind the eight ball

    2. Henry VIII

    3. “Eight O’Clock”

    4. Pieces of eight

    5. 8 ½

    6. Eight lines of verse, the first part of a Petrarchan sonnet, or a stanza consisting of eight lines.

    7. Octavo

    8. Eight Men Out

  7. #127
    Cat Person DickZ's Avatar
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    Thanks, Auntie. I enjoyed both the quizzes on SEVENS and EIGHTS, and I'm anxiously awaiting the appearance of the quiz on NINES.

    I got many of the answers in both quizzes, but not all the answers in either.
    Currently reading Lust for Life by Irving Stone. Recently completed The Origin by Irving Stone, Moguls and Iron Men by James McCague, The Great Bridge by David McCullough, All the Great Prizes by John Taliaferro, Empire by Gore Vidal, Middlemarch by George Eliot, Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, Animal Farm by George Orwell, The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton.

  8. #128
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
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    All but number 3 on this last quiz. Shortening the quiz seem to give me better odds...
    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

  9. #129
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    Thanks so much, Dick, for taking and "bumping" the quizzes, and Pen! It's great to see you back on the ol' LitNet forums!

  10. #130
    aspiring Arthurianist Wilde woman's Avatar
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    Hi Auntie! I'm so glad you've put up a few more quizzes for us.

    For the 7 quiz, I got 5/7 - missed the first and last ones.

    And for the 8 quiz, I also got 5/8 - #1-3 (though three was purely a lucky guess) and #6-7. I must thank my paleography class for teaching me about #7. I can't believe I forgot the Fellini film!
    Ecce quam bonum et jocundum, habitares libros in unum!
    ~Robert Greene, Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay

  11. #131
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    The great American poet who wrote the lines: “Lifeless in appearance, sluggish/dazed spring approaches” hit the nail right on its frozen head. Certainly the lines apply to the Great Northeast of the U.S., where some folks choose to live for the “change of seasons,” the terms for which are “Almost Winter, Winter, Still Winter, and Construction.” Even so, some signs of spring have already been spotted here in East Hogwash. Just the other day I saw a beer can and an old tire peeking their little heads out from the bottom of
    a snowbank.

    The questions and answers below all have an affinity with the word for the season which that glossy liar, the calendar, says it is. In any event, spring right down to this week’s quiz, a twisted Slinky toy we like to call

    Spring, Sprang, Sprung

    1. The poetic lines in the intro come from a 1923 verse called “Spring and All” which opens with: “by the road to the contagious hospital/ under the surge of the blue/ mottled clouds driven from the/ northeast–a cold wind.” Name the poet.

    2. What was the title of Ernest Hemingway’s debut novel, first published in 1926?

    3. What is the technical term for the first day of spring, when the number of daylight hours is, allegedly, equal to the number of hours of darkness?

    4. The orchestral composition“Le Sacre du Printemps” (“The Rite of Spring”) provoked a full-scale riot after its 1913 premiere. Who was the composer?

    5. The word for the forty days preceding Easter, a time reserved for penance, fasting, and spiritual renewal for Christians, is the same as the M.E. word for “spring.” Even though these days we're aware of it more in the breach than in the observance, what do we call it now?

    6. The present-day version of a German play by Frank Wedekind features rock music while retaining the original plot about a bunch of teenagers whose fancy has suddenly turned to thoughts of, ahem, “love.” Name this Broadway show which won the 2007 Tony Award for Best Musical.

    7. And speaking of er, “love,” theologians of centuries past attempted to reconcile their ideal of chastity with the explicit passages within a certain book of the Bible. The former interpretation of this scripture as an “allegory” about the relationship between God and His worshipers has since been abandoned, and the erotic elements have been accepted for what they are, as in these lines: “A garden inclosed is my sister, my spouse, a spring shut up, a fountain sealed.” What is the title of this Old Testament text?

    8. And finally, the section of Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons which was earmarked to represent spring has a title which sounds like a variety of pasta sauce. What is it?


    Answers
    1. William Carlos Williams
    2. The Torrents of Spring
    3. Vernal equinox
    4. Igor Stravinsky
    5. Lent
    6. Spring Awakening
    7. “The Song of Solomon” (“The Song of Songs”)
    8. “La Primavera”
    Last edited by AuntShecky; 03-22-2011 at 05:24 PM.

  12. #132
    aspiring Arthurianist Wilde woman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AuntShecky View Post
    that glossy liar, the calendar
    I absolutely love your turn of phrase here, Auntie! And I sympathize. Here in upstate New York, we finally had a spring-like week last week. All the snow melted, the temperature got up into the 50s, and I was able for the first time in 4 months to go outside in something other than snow boots. But when I woke up this morning, it was snowing AGAIN! In a single day, we went from no snow to 5 inches, with more expected tonight and tomorrow. And I've discovered how much bad weather can completely ruin your day. Winter apparently NEVER ENDS here.

    Anyways, for the quiz I got all but #2. For #3, I immediately got the "equinox" ("equal night") part, but was really struggling to come up with the first word. Then I saw all the green "springs" you put in, Auntie, and the word ("vernal") came to me. I don't know if you intended it that way, but thanks! As luck would have it, my eclectic knowledge of musicals, Classical music, Middle English, and Italian all came in useful here...which is about the only thing which has gone right for me all day. Thanks for making me feel better in this miserable snowbound hell.
    Ecce quam bonum et jocundum, habitares libros in unum!
    ~Robert Greene, Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay

  13. #133
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    April fools my asp


    To honor saints and presidents
    We have days off from work and schools,
    but get no rest nor holidays
    From ever-present fools
    .

    Tomorrow is the first day of April. (Don’t let that foot o’ snow on the ground fool you.) Watch out for pranks and practical jokes, neither of which were imbedded-- at least consciously so--in this week’s raspberry. I know, I hear ya: yours fooly had better quit foolin’ around and trip right over to the foolish banana peel, hot foot, and open manhole which we like to call

    No Foolin’

    1. Which Shakespearean character cried, “Lord, what fools these mortals be?”

    2. Name the English poet who observed that “[f]ools rush in where angels fear to tread.”

    3. With what does the analogy in Proverbs 26:11 compare a fool returning to his folly?

    4. A classic of world literature opens with a celebration called “The Festival of Fools,” which in medieval times occurred not on April Fool’s Day but on January 1, or in this case, January 6, the Feast of Epiphany. What is the title of this 1831 work?

    5. Known for her technically brilliant short fiction, Katherine Anne Porter produced only one full-length novel. Name this work which has been praised as “a major achievement of allegorical writing.”

    6. What did an athlete named Foolish Pleasure achieve in 1975?

    7. Name the work by contemporary American novelist Richard Russo which formed the basis for a 1994 theatrical movie starring Paul Newman.

    8. We’ll wrap this up with a musical question. Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, Ketty Lester et al. provide the answer. Maybe you can answer it as well: Why am I a fool?






    Answers

    1. Puck
    2. Alexander Pope
    3. “As a dog returneth to his vomit.” (Don’t look at me– I didn’t write it!)
    4. The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo
    5. Ship of Fools
    6. Won the Kentucky Derby
    7. Nobody’s Fool
    8. Click here.


    Last edited by AuntShecky; 03-31-2011 at 06:27 PM.

  14. #134
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    What d’ya know –it’s May already! If you want to take a break from smelling the blossoms, here’s a little quiz in which the questions ask you to ID authors who were born in this Merry Month. This week’s snorefest is a relatively short one, so that you can get right back to the flowerbed before that pesky woodchuck devours every last one of the tulips. So let’s tiptoe over to the quiz, which we like to call

    May-be Baby

    1. There’s no “catch” in this question: which twentieth century American novelist was born on the first of May, not in ‘22 but a year later?

    2. Born on May 6, 1856, this baby boy grew up to be one of the most significant figures in modern history. Name this person who, for all we know, might have driven his mother crazy. That, of course, means he was perfectly normal. (Hey, sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.)

    3. In a sense, all was “right with the world” on May 7, 1819 when a poetic virtuoso was born in London. Who was he?

    4. If a rainbow appeared over Glen Cove, L.I. New York on May 8, 1937, its gravity didn’t interfere with the birth of which reclusive contemporary novelist? Who is he?

    5. Speaking of rainbows, an “iconic” song about one appeared in the 1939 movie version of a classic children’s book. Who was the original author, born on May 15, 1856 in Chittenango, New York (nowhere near Kansas)?

    6. Name the author born on May 20, 1799 who was famous for writing a compendious tome. (What’s so funny? Sacre bleu!)

    7. If you want to flirt with the danger of a little learning, remember this date: May 21, 1688. That’s when hope sprang eternal, thanks to the birth of which prominent Neoclassical poet?

    8. You don't have to be a detective to figure this one out, because, of course, it’s elementary. Which universally popular British writer was born on May 22, 1859?

    9. It takes only self-reliance to answer this next question: which influential American essayist and poet was born on May 25, 1803?

    10. And finally, lilacs were no doubt blooming in the dooryard when which beloved American poet came into the world on May 31, 1819?






    Answers
    1. Joseph Heller
    2. Sigmund Freud
    3. Robert Browning
    4. Thomas Pynchon
    5. L. Frank Baum
    6. Honoré de Balzac
    7. Alexander Pope
    8. Arthur Conan Doyle
    9. Ralph Waldo Emerson
    10. Walt Whitman

  15. #135
    All are at the crossroads qimissung's Avatar
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    I only got 3, 4, 5, and 10 on that one, Aunty.
    "The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its' own reason for existing." ~ Albert Einstein
    "Remember, no matter where you go, there you are." Buckaroo Bonzai
    "Some people say I done alright for a girl." Melanie Safka

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