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Thread: "Omg! That book changed my life!"

  1. #196
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    The obvious one would be 1984. I don't think anybody who reads this can really help but see the world differently.

    In the Skin of a Lion by Michael Ondaatje was really a big one for me. It also turned me on to The English Patient, also by Ondaatje, which remains one of my favourites to this day. Really everything by Ondaatje captures the essence of the human condition, and translates it in a way that is poetic beyond belief.

    In terms of non-fiction, A People's History of the United States was THE definitive book which really interested me in both history and politics and bridged the gap between ignorant youth and conscientious young adult-hood.

  2. #197
    Registered User marcolfo's Avatar
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    100 years of solitud

    it was as if i was dreaming the entire time i was reading it.
    I'm always home, I'm uncool.

  3. #198
    Registered User Red-Headed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcolfo View Post
    100 years of solitud

    it was as if i was dreaming the entire time i was reading it.
    Have you read 'Love in the Time of Cholera' or 'The General in His Labyrinth'?
    docendo discimus

  4. #199
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  5. #200
    Registered User CaptainHatteras's Avatar
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    I feel that every book that I've read has enriched my perspective on life in one way or another.

  6. #201
    Registered User Red-Headed's Avatar
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    I've been thinking about what books have genuinely really changed my life since looking at this thread. I think Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land was one of them. I read it when I was a teenager, not long after I had left school. I believe it has made me think more about language & different cultures in general. Well, I grok language better now, I think...
    Last edited by Red-Headed; 12-02-2009 at 01:08 PM.
    docendo discimus

  7. #202
    Piθce de Rιsistance Scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red-Headed View Post
    I've been thinking about what books have genuinely really changed my life since looking at this thread. I think Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land was one of them.
    This is one of the most disappointing books I have ever read. I felt like Heinlein sat down and penned his daydreams... And in a rather sexist fashion too.
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    "It is not that I am mad; it is only that my head is different from yours.”
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  8. #203
    Registered User Red-Headed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scheherazade View Post
    This is one of the most disappointing books I have ever read. I felt like Heinlein sat down and penned his daydreams... And in a rather sexist fashion too.
    Well, I was very young when I read it. I know exactly what you mean though. It is still a classic of the genre however. It may not be The Brothers Karamazov & I am pretty sure I wouldn't have agreed with much of Heinlein's politics but it left a profound effect on my young mind. It is a product of its time I suppose.
    docendo discimus

  9. #204
    dancing before the storms baddad's Avatar
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    At the tender age of 15 years old (a trite, as I'm infrequently described as 'tender') I received as a gift a 5 book set of American writer Kurt Vonnegut's satirical tales. A perspective is a reality. Vonnegut's views opened my eyes to a world never before seen, a world greatly in need of explaining! I have expected and demanded explanations ever since..........for the world is a fully complicated and fascinating place.......

  10. #205
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    There are three books that have altered my perspective: Dostoevsky's Notes From Underground, Robert Nathan's Portrait Of Jennie, and Daniel Keyes' Flowers For Algernon.

  11. #206
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    Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood is really good. You might find it a bit slow in the beginning but once it gets going, its good.

  12. #207
    Registered User Red-Headed's Avatar
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    After more thought, I am firmly convinced Patrick Tilley's Mission has had a profound impact on me. Predominantly because the book is such a clever premise & often hilariously funny whilst often being quite profound. Plus it has one of the cleverest endings I have ever seen in a novel. It is one of the handful of novels in English that I have read more than three times (it is not uncommon for me to read multiple translations of novels that were originally written in a language other than English).
    docendo discimus

  13. #208
    Registered User marcolfo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red-Headed View Post
    Have you read 'Love in the Time of Cholera' or 'The General in His Labyrinth'?
    and chronic of a death foretold, and leafstorm, and memories of my melancolich whores, and (la triste y tragica historia de la candida erendira y su abuela desalmada) sorry about the spanish, i just like the title better that way, anyway almost every book Gabo has wrote.
    Note that I said almost.
    I'm always home, I'm uncool.

  14. #209
    Registered User Red-Headed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcolfo View Post
    and chronic of a death foretold, and leafstorm, and memories of my melancolich whores, and (la triste y tragica historia de la candida erendira y su abuela desalmada) sorry about the spanish, i just like the title better that way, anyway almost every book Gabo has wrote.
    Note that I said almost.
    I've read a fair few of his short stories. 'Solitude' 'Cholera' & 'General' are great novels though! I look forward to reading others.
    docendo discimus

  15. #210
    Registered User marcolfo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red-Headed View Post
    I've read a fair few of his short stories. 'Solitude' 'Cholera' & 'General' are great novels though! I look forward to reading others.


    you should read Juan Rulfo. he was a mexican writer also considered one of the greatest in magical realism , Garcia Marquez was greatly influenced by his work. May I recomend 'Burning plain' and 'Pedro Paramo' .
    I'm always home, I'm uncool.

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