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Thread: Classical Listening

  1. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by Petrarch's Love View Post
    blue--This was reminding me that I have you to thank for inspiring me to try the first contrapunctus of The Art of the Fugue on the piano, which I can now perform decently enough for my own enjoyment. Weren't you trying to pick out parts of it on the guitar? How did that go?
    That's great that you play the first fugue now. I expect any day now you'll post a recording of your performance here . I made a little bit of progress on the guitar, but life got in the way, and I haven't looked at it for some time. Alas, I have put too many of these projects on hold -- the c minor fugue from the Well Tempered Clavier, some of the solo violin sonatas, two-part inventions, and so many other ambitions. Such is life, I guess. I have worked out the highest three voices of the organ chorale that is often attached to the end of Art of the Fugue (Wenn wir in hochsten Nothen sein) for guitar, and I used to be able to play it well enough for my own enjoyment. I hope someone (much better than me) plays that piece at my funeral.

    But this is a thread about classical listening, so here is a link to a nice electronic realization of BWV1080.

    Yes, do give Monteverdi another try. I think the key is to start with something like the 1610 Vespers or some of the arrangements for the psalms (By sheer coincidence I happen to have his arrangement of psalm 109 playing at the moment which is adding much richness to a rather dismal gray Chicago afternoon). Psalm 111 is probably his most famous:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cL0QD...layer_embedded

    Some of the madrigals are also wonderful. The operatic works can be lovely but, at least in their entirety, I think may be a slightly more acquired taste.
    Thanks for the Monteverdi suggestions. There was a time when I was more familiar with Monteverdi's works, especially L'Orfeo and some madrigals. For some reason it just didn't connect with me, so I haven't paid attention to Monteverdi for a long time; it probably had more to do with my obsession with Bach than anything about Monteverdi's music.
    Last edited by bluevictim; 12-02-2009 at 02:02 AM.
    Optima dies ... prima fugit

  2. #77
    in angulo cum libro Petrarch's Love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stlukesguild View Post
    It's possible I'm slightly obsessed with this tune, but not as much as this guy:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8f8cf8SL4s

    Best smilie reaction in lit. net history. I'm not even going to attempt to denote my laughter upon viewing it with only a humble laughing green guy. I know, I couldn't believe that video when I stumbled across it.

    Quote Originally Posted by stlukesguild View Post
    La Folia was one of the first classical works of which I became quite enamored. I had an LP (that surely dates me, eh?) of collected Spanish pieces for guitar. My absolute favorite was La Folia.

    Here is a marvelous version of Vivaldi's variation performed by Apollo's Fire... a wonderful local (and now nationally and internationally acclaimed) chamber orchestra specializing in early music:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wb3TaFzxlfI
    That is a wonderful interpretation. They really nail the sweep of the ending. I think I may (just be a tiny margin) prefer my Purcell quartet version, though. They seem to wring more out of the quieter passages and maintain a really wonderful taut suspense throughout. The preference could also be attributable to the inferior youtube sound quality though.

    Quote Originally Posted by bluevictim View Post
    That's great that you play the first fugue now. I expect any day now you'll post a recording of your performance here . I made a little bit of progress on the guitar, but life got in the way, and I haven't looked at it for some time. Alas, I have put too many of these projects on hold -- the c minor fugue from the Well Tempered Clavier, some of the solo violin sonatas, two-part inventions, and so many other ambitions. Such is life, I guess. I have worked out the highest three voices of the organ chorale that is often attached to the end of Art of the Fugue (Wenn wir in hochsten Nothen sein) for guitar, and I used to be able to play it well enough for my own enjoyment. I hope someone (much better than me) plays that piece at my funeral.
    Yes, I know what you mean about having too many projects in the air. I'm afraid my own piano has been a bit neglected of late, and the cello is just going to have to be on hiatus until January. Speaking of which, if you've got the three highest voices on guitar, clearly I need to work up the low voice in cello so that we can meet up and play sometime, or create a crazy hybrid youtube video. Of course that might mean that my cello skills would have to catch up fairly considerably with my imagination. Not sure if my piano version of the contrapunctus is quite up to recording quality yet, but maybe one of these days when I'm less busy I'll post a fragment of my amateur attempts here...on the condition that we get to hear your guitar.

    But this is a thread about classical listening, so here is a link to a nice electronic realization of BWV1080.

    Thanks for the Monteverdi suggestions. There was a time when I was more familiar with Monteverdi's works, especially L'Orfeo and some madrigals. For some reason it just didn't connect with me, so I haven't paid attention to Monteverdi for a long time; it probably had more to do with my obsession with Bach than anything about Monteverdi's music.
    Thanks for the Bach link. Yes, do see about checking out Monteverdi again. I think he may be the sort of composer that grows on one after having done a certain amount of listening/learning in the period.

    "In rime sparse il suono/ di quei sospiri ond' io nudriva 'l core/ in sul mio primo giovenile errore"~ Francesco Petrarca
    "Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can."~ Jane Austen

  3. #78
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    As opposed to suggestions that we are living in an era in which the musical achievements of those outside of a few major figures have been swept under the rug, what we actually find at present is a true Renaissance of exploration and discovery of the music of the past. When I first began to seriously explore classical music... not so many years ago... Schubert's lieder on disc were all but unknown outside of imports found in music stores in big cities or near college campuses specializing in classical music. Handel's operas were almost unknown in preference for his Water Music, Royal Fireworks Music, and oratorios. Gluck was little more than a name, and the historically informed performance (HIP) movement (performances of Bach, Mozart, etc... played upon period appropriate instruments and following the performance manners of the era) was highly controversial.

    As a result of digital technology which brought about a revolution in recording music (making it a far less expensive proposition), marketing music (via outlets like Amazon.com), discussing and sharing music (via internet forums and sites such as YouTube) there has been an explosion of rediscovery of and demand for classical music. This has led to a great growth in the actual world of classical performance. Standing along side the great "romantic scale" symphonic orchestras we now find most major cities may boast of smaller chamber orchestras, orchestras and groups specializing in baroque, medieval, or Renaissance music, chamber music groups (quartets, quintets, etc...) choral societies, lyric operas, etc...

    There are now dozens of magnificent recordings to be found of Gluck's operas, and Handel's operas now exist in a endless array. Vivaldi is undergoing a major re-evaluation as the result of the recording of a huge number of previously unknown and never recorded compositions (arias, masses, concertos, sonatas, and entire operas) discovered in manuscript form in a vast cache some few decades back. For me, Russian opera was one of my most pleasurable recent discoveries... but as a huge fan of "early music" (Bach and before) I am always on the look out for little known Baroque, Renaissance, and Medieval composers. Indeed, I am currently listening to a lovely disc... a Gramophone Award Winner... of the choral music of Tomás Luis de Victoria, a Spanish composer of the late Renaissance:



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M76EaALkzs

    I'd certainly be interested in any more obscure... or less-well-known composers who you have discovered and found to be of some real interest.

    I'll jump right into offering up a first example of an interesting less-than-world-famous composer who I have found truly interesting:

    One of the more fascinating composers that I came across in the past year was the contemporary American composer, William Bolcom. As an avowed William Blake fanatic my interest was piqued when I rst came across mention of Bolcom's settings of the entire Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience. The high acclaim that this work was afforded in critical reviews led me purchase the work on disc. Bolcom recognized that it was quite likely that a work of this scale (3 CDs in length) by a contemporary composer would most certainly appear less than appealing to many would-be buyers. The cost of such a set upon a high-priced label would surely result in many burned copies. As a result, Bolcom had the work released on the budget Naxos label (which has long been supportive of contemporary composers) assuring the purchaser of the highest quality and the liner notes/text... all at a reasonable price.



    This work is worthy of every bit of its reputation and critical acclaim. It is undoubtedly Bolcom's masterpiece and one of the towering achievements of contemporary classical music. Building upon Blake's theory of "contraries", Bolcom constructs this work upon a vast array of contrasting musical styles ranging from traditional classical, dissonant and even atonal Modernism, jazz, and folk... to even blues, bluegrass, and reggae. In some instances the music builds upon and compliments Blake's text... while at other times it intentionally clashes in yet another level of "contrariness". One may question some of the choices... and at times one feels shocked and caught off guard... but ultimately the work as a whole is always interesting... always intriguing... always thought-provoking and thoroughly convincing... impressive... even profound. The quality of the recording... conducted by the great Leonard Slatkin... and including any number of less-than-famous but passionate and truly talented soloists... should be credited for a great deal of the success of this work.

    This grand achievement (of which... unfortunately... there are no examples to be currently found on the web) led me to explore William Bolcom a little bit further. With a little search I discovered that Bolcom is one of the most prolific, critically acclaimed, and accessible of contemporary composers. He is no Stockhausen or Cage best left to the esoteric realm of academics. Indeed, he intentionally embraces polystylism or the use of multiple musical styles... and the blurring of these styles and the notions of the separation of "high" and "low" art. He has written rather lush and romantic and blatantly passionate violin works for Nadia Salerno-Sonnenberg. He has performed his often humorous cabaret songs in numerous recitals accompanied by his talented wife and partner, Joan Morris. The brilliant and silvery-voiced Dawn Upshaw has performed and recorded his works.

    One of his most famous pieces in the lovely "rag" entitled Graceful Ghost (which, if I am not mistaken) Petrarch's Love posted here some time back:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95H_iBjB64o

    Another fascinating work is the suite in 5 movements (The Female Demon, Succuba, Will-O'-the-Wisp, Child-Stealer, The Night Dance) entitled Lilith. This work was based upon the legend of Adam's first wife... a female demon, dating from ancient times, and a child-stealing witch of worldwide folklore. This virtuoso show piece is among the most ambitious music ever written for alto saxophone and it has already become a near legendary challenge for performers:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqqGWy-SN6M

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_wqgSKSKJk

    Bolcom has quite an extensive website that gives far more information about him and his work and numerous links:

    http://williambolcom.com/index.php?contentID=1010
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  4. #79
    Simply because the next-to-latest entry in the thread was a relatively obscure Spanish piece, here's some 13th century Spanish court music that popped out of my memory banks.



    http://www.amazon.com/Echoes-Spain-A...9811579&sr=1-6

    I used to listen to it after particularly hectic deadline periods in a small warehouse (with an excellent stereo, it being a warehouse of musical CD's, etc.) Not a religious collection of songs [EDIT actually, they are religious songs, now that I check it out, have no idea how I had come to believe otherwise], but absolutely beautiful, including some poetry(?) read in a lovely female voice. The amazon samples give an "OK" impression of the CD, but they obviously can't capture the importance of pauses and quiet that frequently occur, nor the sometimes hypnotic quality of the full versions.

    Um...
    Now, I'll reluctantly post a video of extremely low quality, of a performance that I wouldn't want anyone to think of as representative of the recording mentioned above. Seriously, check the amazon link if interested, keeping in mind that the CD itself is of superb quality--a streaming sample could never register the clarity and intimacy of that disc, nor the beautiful flow of the selections as an "album". I only post this youtube vid in order to steer you away from even worse arrangements and performances that an admittedly more convenient youtube search would turn up.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69aYO...859EC9&index=1

    Again, these people do a great job in my opinion, I mean no offense, but the Sonus CD is a completely different experience.
    Last edited by billl; 12-03-2009 at 12:19 AM. Reason: now referring to the NEXT-TO-latest post

  5. #80
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    billl... this particular disc is a recording of selections from the 13th-century Spanish collection of songs known as the Cantigas de Santa Maria (Songs of Holy Mary). Compiled (and in some instances, composed) by King Alfonso X. I have only recently been introduced to these works by an acquaintance and medieval music fanatic. This disc... and several others presenting selections from this body of compositions... are on my wish list. I hav long been a fan of early Spanish music... and you are right in that a good deal of it is not limited to music intended solely for the church or spiritual expression. I have several other discs that I would highly recommend that often build upon erotic/love poems, rowdy and ecstatic dances, and modal chants and droning dirge-like forms that draw inspiration from Middle-Eastern and ancient Hebrew traditions.
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  6. #81
    well, recommend some when you can! BTW, I just edited my post to reflect the fact that I was apparently wrong about them not being religious--I remember from years back hearing about romantic purposes/stories being involved, but I am right now completely confused regarding this point since Wikipedia (on Alfonso X) says that the Cantigas are mostly about miracles performed by the Virgin Mary... It appears to be a combination.
    Last edited by billl; 12-03-2009 at 12:27 AM.

  7. #82
    in angulo cum libro Petrarch's Love's Avatar
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    the choral music of Tomás Luis de Victoria, a Spanish composer of the late Renaissance:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M76EaALkzs

    I'd certainly be interested in any more obscure... or less-well-known composers who you have discovered and found to be of some real interest.
    mmm...lovely stuff. I'll have to put that disc on my wishlist. Maybe I'll get some music money for Christmas.

    As for more obscure composers...
    One of the more fascinating composers that I came across in the past year was the contemporary American composer, William Bolcom.
    Darn, you've chosen the first one that sprang to mind. I find him an intriguing composer. I am no doubt the one that posted his "Graceful Ghost" awhile back. It's one of my favorite pieces of music. I first heard it played by a family friend, Tom Bopp, who's the piano player in the 19th century Wawona hotel in Yosemite National park, and his is still my favorite interpretation of the piece. Because of the personal associations it often makes me think of summer, moonlit verandas and the scent of pine.

    Another fascinating work is the suite in 5 movements (The Female Demon, Succuba, Will-O'-the-Wisp, Child-Stealer, The Night Dance) entitled Lilith. This work was based upon the legend of Adam's first wife... a female demon, dating from ancient times, and a child-stealing witch of worldwide folklore. This virtuoso show piece is among the most ambitious music ever written for alto saxophone and it has already become a near legendary challenge for performers:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqqGWy-SN6M

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_wqgSKSKJk
    Makes me glad I'm not a saxophonist who even needs to contemplate attempting such feats. It's an interesting piece.

    Simply because the next-to-latest entry in the thread was a relatively obscure Spanish piece, here's some 13th century Spanish court music that popped out of my memory banks.



    http://www.amazon.com/Echoes-Spain-A...9811579&sr=1-6

    I used to listen to it after particularly hectic deadline periods in a small warehouse (with an excellent stereo, it being a warehouse of musical CD's, etc.) Not a religious collection of songs [EDIT actually, they are religious songs, now that I check it out, have no idea how I had come to believe otherwise], but absolutely beautiful, including some poetry(?) read in a lovely female voice. The amazon samples give an "OK" impression of the CD, but they obviously can't capture the importance of pauses and quiet that frequently occur, nor the sometimes hypnotic quality of the full versions.

    Um...
    Now, I'll reluctantly post a video of extremely low quality, of a performance that I wouldn't want anyone to think of as representative of the recording mentioned above. Seriously, check the amazon link if interested, keeping in mind that the CD itself is of superb quality--a streaming sample could never register the clarity and intimacy of that disc, nor the beautiful flow of the selections as an "album". I only post this youtube vid in order to steer you away from even worse arrangements and performances that an admittedly more convenient youtube search would turn up.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69aYO...859EC9&index=1

    Again, these people do a great job in my opinion, I mean no offense, but the Sonus CD is a completely different experience.
    Looks like another CD to add to the maybe buy with Christmas money list. Despite the bad video quality I can tell the piece you posted could be lovely on a nice recording.

    I'll have to got think up some properly obscure composer to add to this discussion now.

    "In rime sparse il suono/ di quei sospiri ond' io nudriva 'l core/ in sul mio primo giovenile errore"~ Francesco Petrarca
    "Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can."~ Jane Austen

  8. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by Petrarch's Love View Post
    Speaking of which, if you've got the three highest voices on guitar, clearly I need to work up the low voice in cello so that we can meet up and play sometime, or create a crazy hybrid youtube video.
    That would definitely be fun! Unfortunately, it will probably take me a while to relearn it, especially since I never got around to writing down my fingerings (some of it was quite tricky, if I remember correctly). Of course, I feel compelled to make it abundantly clear that I never performed it very well to begin with ("well enough for my own enjoyment" is a very low standard ).

    Quote Originally Posted by stlukesguild View Post

    Indeed, I am currently listening to a lovely disc... a Gramophone Award Winner... of the choral music of Tomás Luis de Victoria, a Spanish composer of the late Renaissance:
    ...
    I'd certainly be interested in any more obscure... or less-well-known composers who you have discovered and found to be of some real interest.
    Don't miss Victoria's Requiem mass in 6 voices. It is extraordinarily moving. Speaking of Iberian Requiem masses, there are two very nice ones by the Portuguese Duarte Lobo (one in 6 voices, the other in 8 voices). Magalhaes is another Portuguese composer that I like who does not receive a ton of attention. The Missa Dilectus meus in five voices is a great example of Renaissance polyphony.
    Optima dies ... prima fugit

  9. #84
    On the way to work yesterday, I was listening to the iPod on shuffle and heard Barber's cello concerto. I've always leaned toward the innovative, dissonant side of 20th century composed music, but I have my favorites on the not-particularly-noisy side as well: Walter Piston, Vincent Persichetti, and Samuel Barber.

    Barber's Summer Music wind quintet has always been one of my favorites. It's an evocative and tuneful composition that shows Barber's attention to detail.

    Part 1 and Part 2 of Barber's Summer Music for Wind Quintet.

    Regards,

    Istvan

  10. #85
    in angulo cum libro Petrarch's Love's Avatar
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    On the way to work yesterday, I was listening to the iPod on shuffle and heard Barber's cello concerto. I've always leaned toward the innovative, dissonant side of 20th century composed music, but I have my favorites on the not-particularly-noisy side as well: Walter Piston, Vincent Persichetti, and Samuel Barber.

    Barber's Summer Music wind quintet has always been one of my favorites. It's an evocative and tuneful composition that shows Barber's attention to detail.

    Part 1 and Part 2 of Barber's Summer Music for Wind Quintet.

    Regards,

    Istvan
    Babbalanja--Thanks for sharing the Barber wind quintet. Very Debussy meets later 20th century. I like it. I don't actually know much by Barber except for his famous "Adagio for Strings," which I actually like best performed chorally:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkObnNQCMtM


    Since we were talking about less well known music, I was thinking about obscure composers in my music library and realized that "anonymous" was the most obscure possible, and ancient "anonymous" more obscure still. Here's some of his work for Euripides' Orestes:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eim-n4n0tX0

    Obscure yes. Intense, yes. Loveable? Certainly not upbeat, but then if you've read much ancient Greek drama that can't be much of a surprise.

    There, all the way from Barber to Euripides in one fell swoop. Can't say this thread doesn't have breadth.

    "In rime sparse il suono/ di quei sospiri ond' io nudriva 'l core/ in sul mio primo giovenile errore"~ Francesco Petrarca
    "Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can."~ Jane Austen

  11. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by Petrarch's Love View Post
    Here's some of his work for Euripides' Orestes:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eim-n4n0tX0

    Obscure yes. Intense, yes. Loveable? Certainly not upbeat, but then if you've read much ancient Greek drama that can't be much of a surprise.
    That's wonderful! In case anyone is curious, this music is quite ancient indeed -- it survives on a papyrus from around 200 BC.
    Optima dies ... prima fugit

  12. #87
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    Petrarch... The Barber Adagio/Agnus Dei is quite lovely... I have added it to my wish list. Undoubtedly this piece is one of the most beautiful and profoundly tragic pieces of music written in the 20th century... in any century. It is like a tragic question for which there is no possible answer... no possible words.

    The ancient Greek piece is intriguing... albeit rather speculative as to orchestration, pacing, etc... I was surprised to learn that there are a few fragmentary pieces such as this in which the melody was "recorded" through an earlier means of musical notation. Wikipedia suggests that there is even some Mesopotamian music that has been recorded through a system in which notation denotes the various strings on the lyre. Unfortunately no system of recording more complex aspects of music beyond the central melody... no suggestion of instrumental accompaniment let alone any form of polyphony exists prior to the 10th and 11th centuries in Europe. Considering the sophistication of ancient Greek, Roman, Chinese, Indian, and Persian art and literature one must surmise that the loss is quite profound.

    Currently, I'm back with Bach... listening to his Lute Suites performed on guitar by John Williams. These pieces are quite problematic on a number of levels. In the first instance, according to the musicologists, these works were scored in a manner that was quite impossible for performance upon any known 18th century lute. Several of the works, such as BWV 995, were initially scored (with slight variations) for another instrument (in this case, the work was originally part of the cello suites). It has been suggested that Bach may have had little experience with the limitations of the lute and simple composed the music in an abstract manner with little idea of how the work would actually be performed (not unlike The Art of the Fugue) or expecting that lute players would transcribe the works as necessary. There are, however, several purists who have made recordings upon the lute maintaining the original scoring.

    Considering that my favorite performances of Bach's keyboard works are by Glenn Gould, Angela Hewitt, Murray Perahia, and the like... upon piano, I am clearly no purist (although I do quite like many HIP recordings and performances). Williams is an unquestionably masterful guitarist and these pieces are beautifully and fluidly played. It is a pleasure to hear the music of Bach played upon a different instrument that one is used to. It lends the work a unique "color" and draws attention to certain elements that might have been ignored otherwise:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPZlmSH7ISg

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fpnpsbmpx4I
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
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  13. #88

    Wallingford Riegger

    I've been listening to a lot of American serialist Wallingford Riegger recently. His work seems like just the sort of inventive, exciting music that people deny was ever composed using the twelve-tone method.

    Wallingford Riegger: Concerto for Piano and Woodwind Quintet op. 53 (1953)

    Wallingford Riegger: Symphony #4 (1960), first movement

    Riegger was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee during McCarthy's anti-Communist witch hunt, but refused to testify. He died in New York City after suffering a fall in a bizarre dog-leash accident that sounds like something William Gaddis would have dreamed up.

    Regards,

    Istvan

  14. #89
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    He died in New York City after suffering a fall in a bizarre dog-leash accident that sounds like something William Gaddis would have dreamed up.

    Or something out of a Jerry Lewis film? Yes... I found some of the Riegger pieces that I assume you posted over on Brightcecilia to be quite intriguing.
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
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  15. #90
    in angulo cum libro Petrarch's Love's Avatar
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    Hi Babbalanja--Thanks for posting the Riegger. I don't know his work at all, so this is broadening my listening base. Very Jazz meets Debussy on a 12 tone scale. I like it...though I think, like some jazz I like as well, it's the sort of music I can only listen to in certain frames of mind.

    I've been having a very happy musical weekend. Friday I went to the annual performance of Handel's Messiah at this lovely space with acoustics to match the vaulting:



    I love many parts of the [I]Messiah but, for a number of reasons, "He Shall Feed His Flock" currently ranks as one of my favorites. Here's the traditional arrangement with both alto and soprano: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXsPK36jIWY

    And this absolutely rich rendition of the alto part sung by Marion Anderson, which I just found on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZoqU_-J-UY

    and naturally there's the big favorite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnHksDFHTQI

    Then, last night, I attended one of the regular salons (in the 18th century sense) that a couple of Physicists host in conjunction with a group of artistic types in my university neighborhood and, among the ecclectic group of performances, was a wonderful experimental sort of flute piece (the name and composer of which I have lamentably forgotten)performed by a member of a group called "Eighth Blackbird" in almost utter darkness, and a really enjoyable performance of a fragment of Scoenberg's Pierrot Luniare. "Enjoyable" not usually being an adjective I use to describe that piece, it was either an unusually fine performance or I'm maturing in my musical tastes (or both). One of the music professors present also gave some helpful background about the way the Sprechstimme style was heavily influenced by cabaret performance (being a group of artists and academics, a debate about the proper lighting for the performance at hand ensued). Here's the excerpt I was enjoying last night:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aERSzX9W5Qo

    "In rime sparse il suono/ di quei sospiri ond' io nudriva 'l core/ in sul mio primo giovenile errore"~ Francesco Petrarca
    "Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can."~ Jane Austen

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