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Thread: Strong female characters

  1. #31
    Lost in the Fog PabloQ's Avatar
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    My Antonia - Willa Cather
    No damn cat, no damn cradle - Newt Honniker

  2. #32
    Snowqueen Snowqueen's Avatar
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    Bathsheba Everdene from Far from the Madding Crowd is depicted as a proud and strong nerved woman.

  3. #33
    Absinthe minded bIGwIRE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desolation View Post
    Catherine in A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway
    Caddy in The Sound and the Fury by Faulkner
    Catherine I agree with.
    For Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury I would add Dilsey, or even Quentin, as well as her mother, Caddy.

    For grievous war these arms don't ask,
    No armor, save this joyous flask

  4. #34
    Internal nebulae TheFifthElement's Avatar
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    Kristin Lavransdatter from...Kristin Lavransdatter. By Sigrid Undset. Excellent book.

    Also, can't remember the names of either of the characters but both main lady characters in Hotel du Lac by Anita Brookner and Moon Tiger by Penelope Lively.
    Want to know what I think about books? Check out https://biisbooks.wordpress.com/

  5. #35
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    Lily Briscoe from Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse.

  6. #36
    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    There can't be none stronger than Jean Paget from A Town Like Alice by Neville Shute.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

  7. #37
    Registered User jmanu86's Avatar
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    I chime in with Sherine Khalil, from Paulo Cohelo's "The witch of Portobello". A strong and decided girl. really love her. He always depicts awesome female characters in his novels.

  8. #38
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowqueen View Post
    Bathsheba Everdene from Far from the Madding Crowd is depicted as a proud and strong nerved woman.
    Totally agree with this!

  9. #39
    String Dancer Shea's Avatar
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    I just wanted to reiterate what others have suggested...

    "Their Eyes Were Watching God" - read that several times, loved it!

    "Tess of the D'urbervilles"- though it's been a while since I read it.

    "Romeo and Juliet" - She is a strong female for her day. She doesn't "fall in line" with her family. It doesn't matter to her that Romeo is the son of her family's enemy. She loves him anyway.
    Hwt! We Gar-Dena in geardagum,/eodcuninga rum gefrunon,/hu a elingas ellen fremedon!
    Oft Scyld Scefing sceaena reatum,/ monegum mgum, meodosetla ofteah,/ egsode eorlas, syan rest wear/ feasceaft funden; he s frofre gebad,/ weox under wolcnum, weormyndum ah,/ ot him ghwylc ara ymbsittendra/ofer hronrade hyran scolde,/gomban gyldan. t ws god cyning!

  10. #40
    Seasider
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    Am I going blind? I haven't seen Jane Eyres's name mentioned.

    And what about the wonderful Miss Betsey Trotwood, David Copperfield's great aunt? He owes so much to her and she is generous to all she knew, even in the the case of Mr Wickfield, those who had cheated her. 4 Cheers for Betsey!!

  11. #41
    String Dancer Shea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seasider View Post
    Am I going blind? I haven't seen Jane Eyres's name mentioned.
    I totally agree with you about Jane Eyre. But the originator of the topic mentioned enjoying many Bronte books already. I assumed they'd already read it.
    Hwt! We Gar-Dena in geardagum,/eodcuninga rum gefrunon,/hu a elingas ellen fremedon!
    Oft Scyld Scefing sceaena reatum,/ monegum mgum, meodosetla ofteah,/ egsode eorlas, syan rest wear/ feasceaft funden; he s frofre gebad,/ weox under wolcnum, weormyndum ah,/ ot him ghwylc ara ymbsittendra/ofer hronrade hyran scolde,/gomban gyldan. t ws god cyning!

  12. #42
    the beloved: Gladys's Avatar
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    It's hard to better the enigmatic Catherine I (nee Earnshaw) from Bronte's Wuthering Heights.

    For inner strength, I'd choose the ever-so-subtle Maggie (nee Verver) from The Golden Bowl of Henry James.
    "Love does not alter the beloved, it alters itself"

  13. #43
    BadWoolf JuniperWoolf's Avatar
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    Philomila and Procne

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  14. #44
    archivist extraordinaire AlysonofBathe's Avatar
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    I'm a little late to the party, but I think there's a pretty good list here already. Definitely agree with much of Woolf's canon, as well as Austen's and the Bronte's.

    Don't know whether it's been mentioned, but also L.M. Montgomery's Anne series, especially the first. Moreover, her Emily series as well, often overshadowed by that loud redhead.

    Cheers,
    Alyson
    Alyson of Bathe's feeble attempt at completing the 1001 books challenge. You would think a former English major would have a better start than this. For the Reading.

  15. #45
    String Dancer Shea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlysonofBathe View Post
    Don't know whether it's been mentioned, but also L.M. Montgomery's Anne series, especially the first. Moreover, her Emily series as well, often overshadowed by that loud redhead.
    Oooh, yeah, I'd forgotten about "that loud redhead" Great suggestion I'm not familiar with her Emily series. I'll have to read them someday.
    Hwt! We Gar-Dena in geardagum,/eodcuninga rum gefrunon,/hu a elingas ellen fremedon!
    Oft Scyld Scefing sceaena reatum,/ monegum mgum, meodosetla ofteah,/ egsode eorlas, syan rest wear/ feasceaft funden; he s frofre gebad,/ weox under wolcnum, weormyndum ah,/ ot him ghwylc ara ymbsittendra/ofer hronrade hyran scolde,/gomban gyldan. t ws god cyning!

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