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Thread: Tender is the Night

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    Tender is the Night

    I finished reading this gem about one week ago. I could not get too attached to the first few chapters, but the pages definitely sucked me in by the end of the first part. It tells a tale of success, frivolity, insanity, adultery, and deceit; not once did I see the ending within sight, and its result seems remiscient upon Lady Chatterly's Lover, Anna Karenina, or even Madame Bovary, yet has the same hauntings of Macbeth. Does anyone have any thoughts?

    ***SPOILERS***
    The irony of Dr. Dick Diver basically having a reciprocation with the situation of his wife, Nicole, seemed especially psychologically surprising. The doctor ended up as the patient, afflicted with depression, alcoholism, broken, poor, while Nicole, after struggling with previous abuse from her father, ended up in success. I would think it safe to say that Dick began his cascade downhill after breaking his Hippocratic oath by falling in love with one of his patients. Does his fate seem just, however? Does his result as a trusted individual in a respectable occupation seem deserved?
    Absolutely. I considered Dick Diver, coming from a hardworking American family, a diligent, polite man, worthy of respect, but his later frivolous lifestyle corrupts him to succumb to his appetites, peaking at the beginning of the novel when he encounters Rosemary. He sees himself, I believe, heading towards an awful fate when his good friend, Abe North, gets killed partially as a result of his partying and drinking.
    How Nicole Diver, in a way, ends up as the heroine of the novel I found especially genius - a young girl, sexually abused, delirious, tossed into a psychiatric institution, then rises to greatness by her own doing, even after getting somewhat abandoned by her former doctor and husband, Dick, betrayed at the very least. She goes from getting caught in self-mutilation in a restroom to falling in love with Tommy Barban, admitting to it, and running away from him. Quite a jump!
    Rosemary confused me. To me, she seems one of the main characters in the first part, but ends up more like a Monet painting in the background - something that affects the entire story, alluring by sight, but deceiving once the eyes get near. Once the novel ended, I wondered what happened to her later in life. Living a lavish, Epicurean lifestyle, young, supported by her mother, she reminds me of a spoiled brat who takes much for granted, and does not consider the results of her actions. Perhaps an actress can act well, but not live well.

    I know this novel seems partially autobiographical in part of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Apparently, early in their marriage, his wife, Zelda, fell ill with what they suspected as schizophrenia; sadly, she never recovered, and died years later inside the psychiatric institution, alone. Fitzgerald, distraught by her absence, overwhelmed with medical bills, I heard, fell into poverty, alcoholism, quit writing, and died young himself of a heart condition; if Fitzgerald had lived to continue Tender is the Night, I fear Dick Diver would have left this world in an equally unfortunate, depressing manner.

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    malkavian manolia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    I finished reading this gem about one week ago. I could not get too attached to the first few chapters, but the pages definitely sucked me in by the end of the first part. It tells a tale of success, frivolity, insanity, adultery, and deceit; not once did I see the ending within sight, and its result seems remiscient upon Lady Chatterly's Lover, Anna Karenina, or even Madame Bovary, yet has the same hauntings of Macbeth. Does anyone have any thoughts?
    I am reading this book as we speak. I have only read about 40 pages (so thanks for the spoiler alert - i have read only the part of your post i am quoting).
    Geez i thought it was just me! I too can't feel attached to the first few chapters (i was beginning to think that there's something wrong with my english and i was missing something). What was a bit peculiar is the way he choses to introduce his main "cast". I mean i had to re-read the first few chapters (partly) to remember who is who and who did or said what.
    And Rosemary's infatuation with Dick Diver seems a bit odd (i don't believe in love by first sight)..anyway like you said above it really gets more interesting as i read. I really enjoy his prose (but that's no revelation since i've already read and liked The great Gatsby)..i like the words he uses if you know what i mean.
    I'll return for more if you are interested in discussing the book ( i guess you do since you posted a thread boy i am clever )
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    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    I thought this an under rated gem as well. Dick Diver is such a great 20th century tragic figure. I think Fitzgerald really connected with him.
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    Quote Originally Posted by manolia View Post
    I am reading this book as we speak. I have only read about 40 pages (so thanks for the spoiler alert - i have read only the part of your post i am quoting).
    Geez i thought it was just me! I too can't feel attached to the first few chapters (i was beginning to think that there's something wrong with my english and i was missing something). What was a bit peculiar is the way he choses to introduce his main "cast". I mean i had to re-read the first few chapters (partly) to remember who is who and who did or said what.
    And Rosemary's infatuation with Dick Diver seems a bit odd (i don't believe in love by first sight)..anyway like you said above it really gets more interesting as i read. I really enjoy his prose (but that's no revelation since i've already read and liked The great Gatsby)..i like the words he uses if you know what i mean.
    I'll return for more if you are interested in discussing the book ( i guess you do since you posted a thread boy i am clever )
    I doubt if there seems anything wrong with your English, manolia; from what it sounds you read and write very well. I hope you enjoy the novel, and would love to discuss it with you, if you feel up to it.
    Rosemary, indeed, seems an attractive, alluring figure in the novel, and, not to spoil things too much, seems the most central character, but Fitzgerald has a bit more to offer. To me, Rosemary appeared a greatly immature young woman, slightly pompous, but just the type who falls to infatuation fast, flirts a lot, and appears 'an easy catch' to men.
    Seeing that you, Virgil, and I have only posted here (and have no worries of Virgil - he has a good, kind spirit), please post any thoughts you have throughout the novel. I would love to discuss it more.

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    Registered User mona amon's Avatar
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    I read it a long time ago and unfortunately remember nothing at all, except that I thought it was very good at that time.
    Exit, pursued by a bear.

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    malkavian manolia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    Rosemary, indeed, seems an attractive, alluring figure in the novel, and, not to spoil things too much, seems the most central character, but Fitzgerald has a bit more to offer. To me, Rosemary appeared a greatly immature young woman, slightly pompous, but just the type who falls to infatuation fast, flirts a lot, and appears 'an easy catch' to men.
    I have mixed feelings concerning Rosemary. She seems very immature as you say but i can't help but think that she also has certain "Lolita" qualities..she does seduce Dick with her girlishness..she seems very innocent but yet not quite. She is aware of her beauty. She is also aware that what she is doing is wrong (since D is married to Nicole) and what makes matters worse is that Nicole is her friend.
    Also she is an apathetic character, isn't she? She never objects to anything her mother says (she doesn't seem to have an opinion on anything anyway). We don't even know if she likes being an actress, do we? She shows a bit of reluctance when she is suppossed to meet the director (forgot his name).

    I also have to admit that i dislike her mother. She seems like a very controlling woman, but she achieves that in a subtle way, doesn't she? I mean she is the one who literally drags her beautiful teenage daughter and makes an actress out of her (its only fortunate that Rosemary is talented too). She also prevails upon her to go to Europe (after her pneumonia) and what is more surprising when Rosemary admits her love for Dick, she doesn't talk her out of it! Doesn't she look like an opportunist to you? Or is she the exact opposite? A woman who sacrifices her personal life (everything) for her daughters well being? It is early to judge her, i know ( i just started the second book) so i'll see if i change my mind. Fitzgerald does a great jod describing his characters

    Reading the first book, i inevitably thought of Felini's "Dolce Vita" (i always think about movies). The hedonistic and somewhat shallow society of the book reminded me of that film (if you've seen it you'll understand what i mean - all those pleasure seeking people, going backwards and forwards all day from one pastime to the next etc). Although i admit that Fitzgerald approaches his characters with sympathy (Felini tends to be sarcastic and a bit cruel sometimes).
    Through the darkness of future past
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    'Fire walk with me.'


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    Quote Originally Posted by manolia
    I have mixed feelings concerning Rosemary. She seems very immature as you say but i can't help but think that she also has certain "Lolita" qualities..she does seduce Dick with her girlishness..she seems very innocent but yet not quite. She is aware of her beauty. She is also aware that what she is doing is wrong (since D is married to Nicole) and what makes matters worse is that Nicole is her friend.
    Also she is an apathetic character, isn't she? She never objects to anything her mother says (she doesn't seem to have an opinion on anything anyway). We don't even know if she likes being an actress, do we? She shows a bit of reluctance when she is suppossed to meet the director (forgot his name).

    I also have to admit that i dislike her mother. She seems like a very controlling woman, but she achieves that in a subtle way, doesn't she? I mean she is the one who literally drags her beautiful teenage daughter and makes an actress out of her (its only fortunate that Rosemary is talented too). She also prevails upon her to go to Europe (after her pneumonia) and what is more surprising when Rosemary admits her love for Dick, she doesn't talk her out of it! Doesn't she look like an opportunist to you? Or is she the exact opposite? A woman who sacrifices her personal life (everything) for her daughters well being? It is early to judge her, i know ( i just started the second book) so i'll see if i change my mind. Fitzgerald does a great jod describing his characters
    Yes, Rosemary and her mother make quite the dynamic duo, eh? I thought so, too. I had never seen the Lolita-ness in Rosemary, but certainly can agree with that interpretation - interesting idea. Though Rosemary girlishly and impulsively seduces Dick, I must call him all the weaker for falling victim to her trap; one would think such a well-educated man would have a better head on his shoulders, but que sera, sera.
    In retrospect, Rosemary and her mother tend to really feed off of eachother in a somewhat passive-aggressive way; her mother tends to seem overbearing in booking all of her daughter's films, travels, etc., yet when Rosemary tells her of the immoral act of seducing a married man, she basically submissively says "okay, that's all right, dear." It seems almost as if they constantly compete to see 'how far' they can take this project, or 'how extreme' one matter can get. Does that make sense?
    I feel very excited for you that you have started the second part. A lot of surprises await you!
    Quote Originally Posted by manolia
    Reading the first book, i inevitably thought of Felini's "Dolce Vita" (i always think about movies). The hedonistic and somewhat shallow society of the book reminded me of that film (if you've seen it you'll understand what i mean - all those pleasure seeking people, going backwards and forwards all day from one pastime to the next etc). Although i admit that Fitzgerald approaches his characters with sympathy (Felini tends to be sarcastic and a bit cruel sometimes).
    I will have to look that film up - thanks!

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    malkavian manolia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    Yes, Rosemary and her mother make quite the dynamic duo, eh? I thought so, too. I had never seen the Lolita-ness in Rosemary, but certainly can agree with that interpretation - interesting idea. Though Rosemary girlishly and impulsively seduces Dick, I must call him all the weaker for falling victim to her trap; one would think such a well-educated man would have a better head on his shoulders, but que sera, sera.
    Yeah, Dick turns out to be quite a disappointment. I finished the book yesterday (i liked it very much) and i was really saddened by his fate. He is indeed very weak.

    You know, while reading the book i kept thinking that the "world" of the book is a man's world. Women are very insecure, indesicisive, waiting for instruction and/or for a man to make things good, to take responsibility etc (being a woman i am ok with that when i read a book, i always have in mind when the book was written). But despite Dick's living in a man's world he is "tortured" by the women in his life.
    Nicole (his first seducer, or you could again say that Dick was weak marrying Nicole since he knew her condition), Rosemary and her mother, Baby (who is a powerful figure, quite the opposite to the rest women in the novel). So by the end of the book the only thing one can feel about Dick is pity. Such a briliant mind, such talent lost!

    And if you come to think of it his bane were the women in his life. I have the feeling that all of them used him in one way or the other.
    For Nicole, dick was a ticket to a normal life, out of the clinic.
    For Rosemary and her mother, Dick was an idle flirt (as it turns out), an experiment. Do you recall the conversation between Dick and R's mother right after they return from Paris (after the african man is found dead in R's room)? What R's mother says and how the narrator justifies what she says? (Something along the lines that women can't be called cruel for what they do because this world isn't of their making)
    For Baby Dick is the ideal doctor to buy and secure her sister's future (and wash her hands off of all responsibility).

    One can argue back and say that Dick too used those women too. Especially Nicole, since one can argue that he married her for her money. There's a passage somewhere in the second book where we get to hear about Dick's father and his treating of the poor and how that effected Dick. And of course there's the clinic, his dream come true, bought with Nicole's money.
    What do you think about that?

    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    In retrospect, Rosemary and her mother tend to really feed off of eachother in a somewhat passive-aggressive way; her mother tends to seem overbearing in booking all of her daughter's films, travels, etc., yet when Rosemary tells her of the immoral act of seducing a married man, she basically submissively says "okay, that's all right, dear." It seems almost as if they constantly compete to see 'how far' they can take this project, or 'how extreme' one matter can get. Does that make sense?
    I feel very excited for you that you have started the second part. A lot of surprises await you!
    Yes it does make sense
    Yes a lot of surprises! First of all Nicole's past. I think that she is a tragic figure too, despite the fact that she gets well in the end.

    EDIT
    I just read the rest of your opening post. I'll come back to it later. You make some very good points there.
    Last edited by manolia; 02-09-2009 at 04:37 AM.
    Through the darkness of future past
    the magician longs to see
    one chance out between two worlds
    'Fire walk with me.'


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    Beautiful interpretation, manolia.
    You saw a lot of things I did not see, particularly with the conversations among Dick and Rosemary's mother. I recall well that specific part of the novel you referred to, after the murder, but cannot place the quote either; I will have to search around for it.
    Nicole Diver, I think, seemed a greatly complex character in the novel; towards the beginning, she seems confident, mysterious, witty, and clever, but, once the veil lifts, it turns out she comes from a dark past of victimization and has several 'skeletons in the closet,' so to speak. Dick may have used her, I agree, for she had a lot of monetary worth, and he may have had an ulterior motive, as you suggested, but I think his obvious appetite for 'women in distress' lured him, too; notice how Dick suddenly loses some interest in Rosemary, after she ends up so much more confident, but he had endlessly more attraction for her when she appeared naive and innocent in the beginning of the novel, just so, he seems less compassionate for Nicole when she gains indepedent strength.
    Undeniably, I strongly agree with you that a trend of weak women appear in the novel, but also an uprising and strengthening, while Dr. Dick Diver falls backwards in success, and ends up as somewhat of a wanderer in his profession. A true shame, for I cannot help but feel pitiful for the poor fellow. That quotation you alluded to, I think, would fit in this reference, too - perhaps of a world created by man coming to failure?
    Excellent ideas.

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    malkavian manolia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    The irony of Dr. Dick Diver basically having a reciprocation with the situation of his wife, Nicole, seemed especially psychologically surprising. The doctor ended up as the patient, afflicted with depression, alcoholism, broken, poor, while Nicole, after struggling with previous abuse from her father, ended up in success. I would think it safe to say that Dick began his cascade downhill after breaking his Hippocratic oath by falling in love with one of his patients. Does his fate seem just, however? Does his result as a trusted individual in a respectable occupation seem deserved?
    You make two good points here. I didn't view it in this light but it's actually true. Hehe since you brought up Hippocrates i can bring up Nemesis It's like Dick is punished isn't it? He didn't listen to his peers when they advised him not to marry Nicole and he suffers the consequencies.
    Yes he ends up as a patient. I'd further add that during all his married life with Nicole he was more like a doctor to her than a husband. When he isn't needed anymore as a doctor he stops being her husband!! Their whole life together was more like a project, a scientific experiment.

    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    Absolutely. I considered Dick Diver, coming from a hardworking American family, a diligent, polite man, worthy of respect, but his later frivolous lifestyle corrupts him to succumb to his appetites, peaking at the beginning of the novel when he encounters Rosemary. He sees himself, I believe, heading towards an awful fate when his good friend, Abe North, gets killed partially as a result of his partying and drinking.
    To this i can only add that despite his decent up bringing it seems that he hasn't build up defences.
    In the beginning of their marriage, he prevails upon Nicole and they seem to lead a simple life, not spending much etc He wants to be the one that brings food upon the table. But that doesn't last long.
    What is more weird is that before he marries Nicole he has a conversation with Baby. Baby isn't aware of his feelings at the time and she confesses that she wants to find a psychiatrist-husband for Nicole. Although Dick is revolted by the idea that the rich upper class family wants to "buy" Nicole a doctor he goes on, marries her and ends up playing the exact role! What an irony!

    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    How Nicole Diver, in a way, ends up as the heroine of the novel I found especially genius - a young girl, sexually abused, delirious, tossed into a psychiatric institution, then rises to greatness by her own doing, even after getting somewhat abandoned by her former doctor and husband, Dick, betrayed at the very least. She goes from getting caught in self-mutilation in a restroom to falling in love with Tommy Barban, admitting to it, and running away from him. Quite a jump!
    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    I know this novel seems partially autobiographical in part of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Apparently, early in their marriage, his wife, Zelda, fell ill with what they suspected as schizophrenia; sadly, she never recovered, and died years later inside the psychiatric institution, alone. Fitzgerald, distraught by her absence, overwhelmed with medical bills, I heard, fell into poverty, alcoholism, quit writing, and died young himself of a heart condition; if Fitzgerald had lived to continue Tender is the Night, I fear Dick Diver would have left this world in an equally unfortunate, depressing manner.
    Yes that was a really good and clever twist of the plot.
    I wondered if that is possible though. Do schizophrenics get cured? Can a sad incident like the one that happened to Nicole cause schizophrenia (or the schizophrenia is there and is merely triggered by the sad incident)? I guess we must ask Dick
    I know a schizophrenic person. He was perfectly normal till the age of 25. Then something happened (a great emotional stress, don't quite recall) and he started imagining things. He believed that he was constantly being followed etc.

    So the book is in a sense autobiographical? I read about that in the introduction..sad story.
    I also read that Fitzgerald wanted to revise the book. He wanted it to start from the second book and start the story from the beginning. But he died and he didn't have the chance to do it. What do you think about that? Would it be better if the plot followed a linear narration?

    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    Rosemary confused me. To me, she seems one of the main characters in the first part, but ends up more like a Monet painting in the background - something that affects the entire story, alluring by sight, but deceiving once the eyes get near. Once the novel ended, I wondered what happened to her later in life. Living a lavish, Epicurean lifestyle, young, supported by her mother, she reminds me of a spoiled brat who takes much for granted, and does not consider the results of her actions. Perhaps an actress can act well, but not live well.
    I like the Monet allusion
    I think Rosemary is there to fulfill two purposes. The one is to play the catalyst in Dick's life (that's quite obvious).
    The second (that's not something i thought. I read it in the intro of my copy of the book) is the means to let us watch the Divers as other people view them. She makes us see and believe that the Divers are fascinating, mysterious, alluring, interesting etc. That's also a very clever technique. Fitzgerald could have used his "unseen" narrator and say all those nice things about the divers and what we as readers are suppossed to think about them, but he uses Rosemary instead and that is way more convincing.


    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    Dick may have used her, I agree, for she had a lot of monetary worth, and he may have had an ulterior motive, as you suggested, but I think his obvious appetite for 'women in distress' lured him, too; notice how Dick suddenly loses some interest in Rosemary, after she ends up so much more confident, but he had endlessly more attraction for her when she appeared naive and innocent in the beginning of the novel, just so, he seems less compassionate for Nicole when she gains indepedent strength.
    Hehe yeah you're right. The old damsel in distress motive. It is quite true. He likes that. He also seems to like being superior to the woman next to him. He can never accept that Nicole has more money than he does. Nicole can never advise him in anything it seems. When Tommy observes that Dick's been drinking too much and he insists on Nicole saying something to him, Nicole expostulates something along the lines of "me? give Dick advice?"

    One point i wanted to adress is the old Europe vs America conflict which is present in many places in the book (and often takes the shape of "Americans with pockets full of money"). But this post is too long already, so i'll do this latter
    Last edited by manolia; 02-10-2009 at 02:50 PM.
    Through the darkness of future past
    the magician longs to see
    one chance out between two worlds
    'Fire walk with me.'


    Twin Peaks

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    Very interesting ideas, manolia - you have offered a lot of insight to the novel that I failed to see.
    Quote Originally Posted by manolia
    I wondered if that is possible though. Do schizophrenics get cured? Can a sad incident like the one that happened to Nicole cause schizophrenia (or the schizophrenia is there and is merely triggered by the sad incident)? I guess we must ask Dick
    Unfortunately, no, no cure exists; just like any chronic disorder an individual will go through remissions and exacerbations, and I apologize, manolia, to hear of your friend - I wish the best for him.
    Many times the gene that codes for a cognitive disorder like schizophrenia exists, but only gains exposure through traumatic experiences, then human DNA multiplies (as it does, regardless), further exposing the gene; unfortunately, many post-combat soldiers experience delirium, for example.
    Quote Originally Posted by manolia
    I also read that Fitzgerald wanted to revise the book. He wanted it to start from the second book and start the story from the beginning. But he died and he didn't have the chance to do it. What do you think about that? Would it be better if the plot followed a linear narration?
    After finishing Part I of the novel, when it began jumping back plot-wise years, it confused me a bit at first, but in retrospect I loved the non-linear flow, because it makes the reader go back to Part I and say "oooh, aaah, so that's what happened!"
    This seems a common trend in literature of this era, hiding bits and pieces of the plot from the reader, then presenting everything as the novel proceeds; it gave Tender is the Night a bit of an absurdist fate for Dick, but I felt happy Fitzgerald did not change a thing. What do you think?
    Quote Originally Posted by manolia
    One point i wanted to adress is the old Europe vs America conflict which is present in many places in the book (and often takes the shape of "Americans with pockets full of money"). But this post is too long already, so i'll do this latter
    Of course, whenever you have the chance.
    Great discussing this with you, manolia.

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    I actually bought this not so long ago, I've been wondering what Ishould start to read after Kerouac, but now I'm pretty interested.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chava
    I actually bought this not so long ago, I've been wondering what Ishould start to read after Kerouac, but now I'm pretty interested.
    As much as I loved The Great Gatsby, I much preferred Tender is the Night, and I would recommend it to anyone who likes F. Scott Fitzgerald, or enjoys this era of literature. I hope to read This Side of Paradise sometime soon, but will try not to get into it with high expectations, as I have done in the past with other authors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    but will try not to get into it with high expectations, as I have done in the past with other authors.
    Fatal error. I'll pick up Tender is the Night next time I'm at my appartment. Looking foreward now.

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    malkavian manolia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    Unfortunately, no, no cure exists; just like any chronic disorder an individual will go through remissions and exacerbations, and I apologize, manolia, to hear of your friend - I wish the best for him.
    Many times the gene that codes for a cognitive disorder like schizophrenia exists, but only gains exposure through traumatic experiences, then human DNA multiplies (as it does, regardless), further exposing the gene; unfortunately, many post-combat soldiers experience delirium, for example.
    Thanks!
    You seem to know a lot about these things. You sound like a medical man.
    Geez i admire all medical related professions..so important and one need a strong stomach to perform them..my mom works in the hospital..not sure how her profession is called in english though not a nurse, not a doctor.
    For my part i feel really dizzy in hospitals and i hate needles (child trauma )

    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    After finishing Part I of the novel, when it began jumping back plot-wise years, it confused me a bit at first, but in retrospect I loved the non-linear flow, because it makes the reader go back to Part I and say "oooh, aaah, so that's what happened!"
    This seems a common trend in literature of this era, hiding bits and pieces of the plot from the reader, then presenting everything as the novel proceeds; it gave Tender is the Night a bit of an absurdist fate for Dick, but I felt happy Fitzgerald did not change a thing. What do you think?
    In general i prefer linear narration. But i've read many books where non linear narration works well. This was one of them. If the narration was linear the book would have lost the element of surprise.

    One thing that was interesting in this book (and in some places it made me giggle too) was the america vs europe conflict. The most striking instance was the medical conference Dick was suppossed to participate in. I like how the narrator describes Dick's thoughts on the matter. How the european professors seem to run the show and make all the decissions and suggestions, expecting valid input from european doctors only (like america has nothing to offer) but the americans are the ones with the necessary funds so the snotty european professors yield in the end.

    Or when the flood of american tourists is described. They are literally everywhere..and especially when Dick goes to Rome and we view the natives from his point of view..he even calls them stinkers (ok, he's in a very bad period of his life so the reader can excuse him).

    Another striking example is Franz and his wife. They need Nicole's american money to buy the clinic..and as we keep reading we realise that they don't even like Nicole (Franz's wife at least). Nicole cringes at any personal contact with that woman and she on her part thinks that Nicole shuns her because she smells bad (and here the unseen narrator says something about american women who are more materialistic than european - that could be true at that particular era since the biggest part of europe was greatly damaged by the war).

    Oh and the incident with the french drunkard cook who is caught drinking Dick's expensive wine? She is at fault and instead of apologising she starts swearing the american couple and their money and how they get to drink France's best wines.

    Or when Franz admits that he thought (when he first met Dick) that Dick was a british guy (because he couldn't believe that such a genious could come from the US).

    EDIT
    Chava i agree with mono. Tender is the night is more interesting than Great Gatsby. Both good books, excellent prose but the subject matter in TITN is far more interesting, at least to me.
    Last edited by manolia; 02-12-2009 at 01:55 PM.
    Through the darkness of future past
    the magician longs to see
    one chance out between two worlds
    'Fire walk with me.'


    Twin Peaks

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