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Thread: Hemingway

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    Registered User atena_63's Avatar
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    Hemingway

    Hi everyone , have you read hemingway's " Farewell to Arms " ? what is your idea about it and hemingway's style as well ?
    I like to know your opinions for completing my critical study of this novel .
    Last edited by atena_63; 01-15-2009 at 05:00 AM.

  2. #2
    What do you think about Hemingway's style? Why? Where do you locate this from in the text?

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    One of my favorite novels, but I'm not going to do your homework for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by atena_63 View Post
    Hi everyone , have you read hemingway's " Farewell to Arms " ? what is your idea about it and hemingway's style as well ?
    I like to know your opinions for completing my critical study of this novel .
    Indeedy, twice, and quite possibly my favorite novel by him, if not The Old Man and the Sea.
    Spoiler Warning
    The main character Frederic Henry regards himself soberly, realistically, undramatically, and, at times, too seriously, in my opinion, as Ernest Hemingway may have himself; I would call him stoic, if anything. His rather indifferent views toward the war seem significant in comparison to his passionate love for Catherine Barkley, a international conflict seeming a tree amid a forest while one woman appears brighter than the sun; this seems significant because Hemingway served in World War I, and, in his 61 years, got married 4 times.
    In terms of reading, A Farewell to Arms reads much in the way as many of Hemingway's novels do - very blunt, emotional only through firmness, with strong words, and minimally descriptive; the author attempts to portray the personality of each main character through speech rather than description (typical of the Lost Generation, as opposed to the Romanticists, for example), and the co-starring characters, so to speak, and so few they exist as, with often times with an indifferent influence and more as "fillers" for chapters, take Rinaldi, for instance. This, I think, places emphasis upon Hemingway's introversion and antisocial ways, thus his inability to agree with others, gain influence from others, but when he falls for a beautiful woman . . . wow, and so he does, with such intensity!
    As Frederic Henry's character seems strong and stoic, so Catherine Barkley's character seems submissive and emotional; during Henry's hospitalization, the main character finally recognizing his vulnerability, Barkley has, in a way, tamed the lion, and Frederic Henry has doffed the war as a stressor, and nearly exhausts Catherine, his nurse, with his need for emotional and intimate attention - again, his intensity.
    Unlike the typical novel, where the climax arrives toward the center of the story, followed by a recovery or resolution, A Farewell to Arms contains an immense climax towards the end and a negative resolution, resulting in precisely how it began, with a pessimistic, phlegmatic main character, increasingly hurt by his past. Catherine Barkley has died along with their child, and Frederic Henry may have grown wiser, but has ended the more cynical and somewhat an absurdist.

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    Registered User atena_63's Avatar
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    Dear mono , thank you so much for your commentaries.
    I think in this novel "love" is an important issue. Actually Fredrick and Cathrine seek a kind of diversion to distance themselves from the war and the outside world . I'm really fascinated by Hemingway's deep viewpoint about life in general and war specifically.
    When I was reading this novel I remembered Boll's novels. He also examines the thoughts and emotions of his characters during and after war.
    The faint blaze of the candle of my life ,
    Slowly dying like a fire in a pouring rain,
    No sparks of hope inside
    No shooting stars on my sky
    On broken wings , no flying high

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    Quote Originally Posted by atena_63 View Post
    I think in this novel "love" is an important issue. Actually Fredrick and Cathrine seek a kind of diversion to distance themselves from the war and the outside world . I'm really fascinated by Hemingway's deep viewpoint about life in general and war specifically.
    Love seems an important issue in the majority of Hemingway's novels - Frederic Henry's love for Catherine Barkley in A Farewell to Arms, Robert Jordan's love for Maria in For Whom the Bell Tolls, Jake Barnes' love for Lady Brett Ashley in The Sun Also Rises.
    Most Hemingway novels contain an element of love not reciprocated, with an element of desperation, and with an element of stoicism. Stoicism has a usefulness in war, as Zeno taught, but Hemingway attempted to balance the resistance and prudence to vulnerability and passion.

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    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    Is that mono?? Nice to see you back Mono.
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    "Love follows knowledge." St. Catherine of Siena

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by mono View Post
    Love seems an important issue in the majority of Hemingway's novels - Frederic Henry's love for Catherine Barkley in A Farewell to Arms, Robert Jordan's love for Maria in For Whom the Bell Tolls, Jake Barnes' love for Lady Brett Ashley in The Sun Also Rises.
    Most Hemingway novels contain an element of love not reciprocated, with an element of desperation, and with an element of stoicism. Stoicism has a usefulness in war, as Zeno taught, but Hemingway attempted to balance the resistance and prudence to vulnerability and passion.
    Somehow, you always make me cascade into thoughts about things. I had a reply, but after thinking about it just a little longer, i decided there was so much more too it, and now i've got to think some more before I say anything... :S Man I miss discussing literature!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Virgil View Post
    Is that mono?? Nice to see you back Mono.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chava
    Somehow, you always make me cascade into thoughts about things. I had a reply, but after thinking about it just a little longer, i decided there was so much more too it, and now i've got to think some more before I say anything... :S Man I miss discussing literature!
    Thanks, Virgil and Chava, I have missed you, too! And your making me blush has made the people in my avatar even paler!

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