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Thread: Virginia Woolf: "A Room of One's Own"

  1. #1

    Virginia Woolf: "A Room of One's Own"

    DO NOT click on the top of these pages where it says SITE MAP

    Chapter 1:
    american-buddha.com/room.own.1.htm

    Chapter 2:
    american-buddha.com/room.own.2.htm

    The above link has this wonderful essay in it's entirety.


    Some excerpts:

    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia Woolf
    The title women and fiction might mean, and you may have meant it to mean, women and what they are like; or it might mean women and the fiction that they write; or it might mean women and the fiction that is written about them; or it might mean that somehow all three are inextricably mixed together and you want me to consider them in that light.

    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia Woolf
    The organ complained magnificently as I passed the chapel door. Even the sorrow of Christianity sounded in that serene air more like the recollection of sorrow than sorrow itself; even the groanings of the ancient organ seemed lapped in peace.
    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia Woolf
    To the right and left bushes of some sort, golden and crimson, glowed with the colour, even it seemed burnt with the heat of fire. On the further bank the willows wept in perpetual lamentation, their hair about their shoulders. The river reflected whatever it chose of sky and bridge and burning tree, and when the undergraduate had oared his boat through the reflections they closed again, completely, as if he had never been. There one might have sat the clock round lost in thought. Thought -- to call it by a prouder name than it deserved -- had let its line down into the stream. It swayed, minute after minute, hither and thither among the reflections and the weeds, letting the water lift it and sink it, until -- you know the little tug -- the sudden conglomeration of an idea at the end of one's line: and then the cautious hauling of it in, and the careful laying of it out? Alas, laid on the grass how small, how insignificant this thought of mine looked; the sort of fish that a good fisherman puts back into the water so that it may grow fatter and be one day worth cooking and eating.

    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia Woolf

    The critics often say that Esmond is Thackeray's most perfect novel. But the affectation of the style, with its imitation of the eighteenth century, hampers one, so far as I remember; unless indeed the eighteenth-century style was natural to Thackeray -- a fact that one might prove by looking at the manuscript and seeing whether the alterations were for the benefit of the style or of the sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia Woolf
    Meanwhile the wineglasses had flushed yellow and flushed crimson; had been emptied; have been filled. And thus by degrees was lit, halfway down the spine, which is the seat of the soul, not that hard little electric light which we call brilliance, as it pops in and out upon our lips, but the more profound, subtle and subterranean glow, which is the rich yellow flame of rational intercourse. No need to hurry. No need to sparkle. No need to be anybody but oneself. We are all going to heaven and Vandyck is of the company -- in other words, how good life seemed, how sweet its rewards, how trivial this grudge or that grievance, how admirable friendship and the society of one's kind, as, lighting a good cigarette, one sunk among the cushions in the window-seat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia Woolf

    But for all that there was something odd at work:

    My heart is like a singing bird
    Whose nest is in a water'd shoot;
    My heart is like an apple tree
    Whose boughs are bent with thick-set fruit --

    perhaps the words of Christina Rossetti were partly responsible for the folly of the fancy -- it was nothing of course but a fancy -- that the lilac was shaking its flowers over the garden walls, and the brimstone butterflies were scudding hither and thither, and the dust of the pollen was in the air. A wind blew, from what quarter I know not, but it lifted the half-grown leaves so that there was a flash of silver grey in the air. It was the time between the lights when colours undergo their intensification and purples and golds burn in window-panes like the beat of an excitable heart; when for some reason the beauty of the world revealed and yet soon to perish (here I pushed into the garden, for, unwisely, the door was left open and no beadles seemed about), the beauty of the world which is so soon to perish, has two edges, one of laughter, one of anguish, cutting the heart asunder. The gardens of Fernham lay before me in the spring twilight, wild and open, and in the long grass, sprinkled and carelessly flung, were daffodils and bluebells, not orderly perhaps at the best of times, and now wind-blown and waving as they tugged at their roots. The windows of the building, curved like ships' windows among generous waves of red brick, changed from lemon to silver under the flight of the quick spring clouds. Somebody was in a hammock, somebody, but in this light they were phantoms only, half guessed, half seen, raced across the grass -- would no one stop her? -- and then on the terrace, as if popping out to breathe the air, to glance at the garden, came a bent figure, formidable yet humble, with her great forehead and her shabby dress -- could it be the famous scholar, could it be J ____ H ____ herself? All was dim, yet intense too, as if the scarf which the dusk had flung over the garden were torn asunder by star or sword -- the flash of some terrible reality leaping, as its way is, out of the heart of the spring.

    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia Woolf
    There was no reason to complain of human nature's daily food, seeing that the supply was sufficient and coal-miners doubtless were sitting down to less. Prunes and custard followed. And if any one complains that prunes, even when mitigated by custard, are an uncharitable vegetable (fruit they are not), stringy as a miser's heart and exuding a fluid such as might run in misers' veins who have denied themselves wine and warmth for eighty years and yet not given to the poor, he should reflect that there are people whose charity embraces even the prune.

    Quote Originally Posted by Virginia Woolf
    Possibly when the professor insisted a little too emphatically upon the inferiority of women, he was concerned not with their inferiority, but with his own superiority. That was what he was protecting rather hot-headedly and with too much emphasis, because it was a jewel to him of the rarest price. Life for both sexes—and I looked at them, shouldering their way along the pavement—is arduous, difficult, a perpetual struggle. It calls for gigantic courage and strength. More than anything, perhaps, creatures of illusion as we are, it calls for confidence in oneself. Without self-confidence we are as babes in the cradle. And how can we generate this imponderable quality, which is yet so invaluable, most quickly? By thinking that other people are inferior to oneself. By feeling that one has some innate superiority—it may be wealth, or rank, a straight nose, or the portrait of a grandfather by Romney—for there is no end to the pathetic devices of the human imagination—over other people. Hence the enormous importance to a patriarch who has to conquer, who has to rule, of feeling that great numbers of people, half the human race indeed, are by nature inferior to himself. It must indeed be one of the chief sources of his power.
    Last edited by Sitaram; 02-21-2005 at 12:45 AM.

  2. #2
    precious... subterranean's Avatar
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    What kind of site is it? I checked out the main page and voila..some interesting pictures there..(bit inapropriate to say it here )


    "there are people in the world so hungry that God can not appear to them except in the form of bread"

    Mahatma Gandhi

  3. #3
    You have to go TO THE VERY BOTTOM OF THE PAGE, where it says I AGREE, take me to the site... and click.... and then you can read woolfs essay... dont click on the top thing,.... i never tried that

    sigh....

    when I lead a horse to water, not only does he not drink, but i cant even get his nose in the trough
    Last edited by Sitaram; 02-20-2005 at 11:55 PM.

  4. #4
    precious... subterranean's Avatar
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    ROTFL, I'm a person with a very distractive attention. I see what interest me and I do it spontaneously (sp).. anything I see infront my eyes..

    Quote Originally Posted by Sitaram
    You have to go TO THE VERY BOTTOM OF THE PAGE, where it says I AGREE, take me to the site... and click.... and then you can read woolfs essay... dont click on the top thing,.... i never tried that

    sigh....

    when I lead a horse to water, not only does he not drink, but i cant even get his nose in the trough


    "there are people in the world so hungry that God can not appear to them except in the form of bread"

    Mahatma Gandhi

  5. #5
    fortunately, my horse has a sense of humor.....

  6. #6
    Perhaps the saying should be - You can lead the horse to literature, if you can just take it´s eyes of the smut?

    I read this essay some years ago. I remember thinking that the whole essay was not as impressive as a single part of a qoute I´ve read from it - "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction" . This part helped me towards an greater understanding of the dynamics of power, what independence means and how the practical things in evryday life is linked to creativity and expression.

    Sadly, I think that my english is not good enough to grasp all of the twists and turns in Woolf´s language. I get caught up in a word, and before I know it her thoughts are somewhere else. It´s like trying to read competing with fast running water in a brook. For me the essay just turn into wonderful quotes, one after the other, but I can´t grasp the whole picture. I´ll just have to give up and try to find a swedish translation and read it first.
    "Man was made for joy and woe;
    And when this we rightly know
    Through the world we safely go" Blake

  7. #7
    Good morning, Campers! Jay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isagel
    You can lead the horse to literature, if you can just take it´s eyes of the smut?
    ROTFLMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Geez Isagel!!! I'm in a LIBRARY! Have mercy
    I have a plan: attack!

  8. #8
    precious... subterranean's Avatar
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    Oh I'm about to faint now..

    But really, thank ye for the link...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sitaram
    fortunately, my horse has a sense of humor.....


    "there are people in the world so hungry that God can not appear to them except in the form of bread"

    Mahatma Gandhi

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