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Thread: Origin of the term "Pulp Fiction"

  1. #1

    Origin of the term "Pulp Fiction"

    http://www.cinemareview.com/production.asp?prodid=2

    671

    The term pulp fiction originally referred to "pulp"
    paper magazines of the late 19th century, such as
    Weird Tales and The Strand, which featured the work
    of such prolific literary masters as H.G. Wells
    (The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds), Sir
    Arthur Conan Doyle, (The Lost World, The Adventures
    of Sherlock Holmes) J.R.R. Tolkien (Lord of the
    Rings) and Edgar Rice Burroughs (Tarzan of the
    Apes). Generally, pulp fiction stories focused on
    man struggling with dark, powerful and often, evil
    forces -- both internal and external --beyond his
    control. By the early and mid-20th century, pulp
    fiction, with its mix of science fact and
    speculative fiction, launched a new era and genre
    of fantasy stories with compelling alternative or
    parallel realities.

    The enduring universality of these conflicts and
    stories can be seen in the continued popularity of
    such characters as Sherlock Holmes and Tarzan as
    well as of the recent multiple-Oscar-winning film
    series, "Lord of the Rings," based on Tolkien's
    trilogy, and blockbuster film updates and remakes
    of "The Lost World" (Steven Spielberg's film of the
    same title), "King Kong" and the upcoming Robert
    Rodriguez adaptation of Edgar Rice Burrough's "A
    Princess of Mars."

    http://www.miskatonic.org/rara-avis/...9908/0231.html

    how much right do you think Quentin Tarrantino has to use the title
    Pulp Fiction for his movie


    A definition of the term "pulp fiction" is displayed at the beginning
    of the movie, as if to say "This movie is a piece of pulp fiction (so it
    probably shouldn't be taken too seriously)." Not homage to anything,
    just 'nineties self-referential irony.

    http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0804

    Subject: A.Word.A.Day--trochal
    X-Bonus: It is as impossible to translate poetry as it is to translate music. -Voltaire, writer (1694-1778)

    trochal (TRO-kuhl) adjective

    Resembling or revolving like a wheel.

    [From Greek trokhos (wheel), from trekhein (to run).]

    "Consider this unexpected similarity between Pulp Fiction and Forrest Gump: as Pulp Fiction breaks tradition with its trochal form, so Gump breaks the contemporary rules." John H. Richardson; Dumb And Dumber; The New Republic (Washington, DC);
    Apr 10, 1995.

    "It's trochal, as Malcolm Lowry says. Reiterative, as John Dos Passos said."
    Jack Saunders; Forty; Illuminet Press; 1988.
    Last edited by Sitaram; 02-17-2005 at 11:39 AM.

  2. #2
    precious... subterranean's Avatar
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    Thank you Sitaram


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    dancing before the storms baddad's Avatar
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    Pulp fiction was a term 'originally' coined to describe the 'low-grade' quality of the paper originally used to print inexpensive dime-store novels. The paper was made from moistened wood fibre, rags, etc., circa 1920-1930's. The modern term has incorporated the story genre as an overall description of the original content and quality of the product....

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    I think I saw from some other source that the term 'pulp fiction' also has a connection with a reference to comic books, but this seems a very secondary-hearsay resource.

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    precious... subterranean's Avatar
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    And the content must be fiction.......rite?!

    Quote Originally Posted by baddad
    Pulp fiction was a term 'originally' coined to describe the 'low-grade' quality of the paper originally used to print inexpensive dime-store novels. The paper was made from moistened wood fibre, rags, etc., circa 1920-1930's. The modern term has incorporated the story genre as an overall description of the original content and quality of the product....


    "there are people in the world so hungry that God can not appear to them except in the form of bread"

    Mahatma Gandhi

  6. #6
    dancing before the storms baddad's Avatar
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    Si' Sub, and Si' Mono, comic books are a good example to the paper product, and the calibre of fiction the term 'pulp fiction' refers to.....

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