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Thread: I Need Help

  1. #46
    If we may coin a metaphor, wisdom in those desert lands is like water to a ducks back. They have made a most admirable resistance to its invasion.

  2. #47
    Pièce de Résistance Scheherazade's Avatar
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    Which one is more effective? More appealing?
    Juliet is beautiful.
    Juliet is the sun.
    ~
    "It is not that I am mad; it is only that my head is different from yours.”
    ~


  3. #48
    I would choose a compromise of Juliet sunbathing in her garden, LIKE Susanna

  4. #49
    Pièce de Résistance Scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sitaram
    wisdom in those desert lands is like water to a ducks back.
    That would be a simile...
    ~
    "It is not that I am mad; it is only that my head is different from yours.”
    ~


  5. #50
    A solar Juliet is unapproachable, I suppose, distant,.... HOT

  6. #51
    http://knowgramming.com/metaphors/me...difference.htm

    A metaphor is an equation where a simile is an approximation. A simile - to be like something - is to retain some difference which means one can never fully substitute the other. On the other hand, a metaphor actually is a substitution - it is an equation in principle.

    A good book is like a good meal; a simile suggesting that a book may be as mentally nourishing and satisfying as a meal.

    A wire is a road for electrons; a metaphor suggesting that electrons use a wire as a road to travel on.


    In math, I could say that 99 is approximately equal to (or "like") 100 - that would be a simile; but an equation, such as A=B means that if A+3=10 then B+3=10. A simile may be difficult to extend further, but the nature of a good metaphor is that it may always be extended, reversed, re-substituted with other elements and so on (just as an algebraic expression* can).

    Sometimes, we will build both a metaphor and a simile from the same parts, showing how incredibly close these two literary devices are. Compare "a car is like a cell: it travels along a vessel of asphalt" with "a car is a cell...". When building a simile, it helps to keep it clearly removed from a metaphor: "clouds like cotton candy" is clearly a simile.

    Typically, if you need to explain it, it's probably a simile; if it makes instant sense to someone, it's probably a metaphor. If it uses the words "is like" or "is as", it is usually a simile or a misstated metaphor; if it uses the word "is", without "as" or "like", it is usually a metaphor or a misstated simile. Because there is so much confusion surrounding the difference between metaphor and simile, the two are often misstated.

  7. #52
    http://www.belperschool.co.uk/Subjec...nification.php

    Check It Out
    A dead metaphor is one that has been used so often that we have stopped being aware of it. The phrases are so commonly used that the discrepancies involved in the description are ignored.

    The leg of the table You’re breaking my heart The heart of the matter

    Phrases like these, which are extremely overused, are sometimes called clichés. Everyday use of language contains many examples of phrases like this: phrases we all take for granted as literal but which are actually examples of imagery.



    Questions

    Why do writers use imagery?
    What is the difference between a simile and a metaphor?
    What is personification?

    Do the following sentences contain a simile, metaphor or personification?

    She was as ugly as a bulldog chewing a wasp!
    When that sixth number popped up, the future smiled at me
    The moon winked between the storm clouds
    Hail hit the roof like bullets from a machine-gun
    The defender stuck to the forward like glue
    This classroom is a bomb-site! Clear it up now!
    The trees were naked. Below them little boys kicked their way through milk-less cornflakes


    It is often quite simple to change similes into metaphors and metaphors into similes. For example, when Robert Burns (1759-96) wrote

    “O my love’s like a red, red rose”

    he was using a simile. If he had written “O my love is a red, red rose” however, he would have been using a metaphor.

  8. #53
    Pièce de Résistance Scheherazade's Avatar
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    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...0141&dict=CALD
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...3743&dict=CALD


    ************

    In literary terms, 'Juliet is the sun' says more to us, addressing to our imagination; whether Sitaram can handle HOT objects is subject for another discussion
    Last edited by Scheherazade; 02-08-2005 at 12:59 PM.
    ~
    "It is not that I am mad; it is only that my head is different from yours.”
    ~


  9. #54
    The final resort of the desperate is often ad hominem.

  10. #55
    Pièce de Résistance Scheherazade's Avatar
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    And first one of a lady is to overlook such.
    ~
    "It is not that I am mad; it is only that my head is different from yours.”
    ~


  11. #56
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    sitiram u still here?

    Ive just found out i must relate to Heanys North!

  12. #57
    I am here... Say but the word and your soul shall be healed....


    Go, and sin no more.....

  13. #58
    I have written down some thoughts on metaphor in a new thread:

    http://www.online-literature.com/for...4143#post54143

    I hope some of this helps you in your efforts to produce a paper by Friday.

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