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Thread: Poe Short Story Discussion Group

  1. #76
    The Poetic Warrior Dark Muse's Avatar
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    Oh yes, I can see that, good insight, that does make sense. I have liked these lines, I particuarly liked the part about the mouth, but I was unsure just what the intent was with this passage. But that does make sense, I can see how that idea would work here.

    I had particuarly like the line

    I have felt it in the ocean; in the falling of a meteor
    To me this seems to be about the feelings of his love, his passion, as these are too massive things with great chaotic force. As his love for her is so storng, it is almost a violent force within his soul.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  2. #77
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    --"And the will therein lieth, which dieth not. Who knoweth the mysteries of the will, with its vigor? For God is but a great will pervading all things by nature of its intentness. Man doth not yield him to the angels, nor unto death utterly, save only through the weakness of his feeble will."

    Length of years, and subsequent reflection, have enabled me to trace, indeed, some remote connection between this passage in the English moralist and a portion of the character of Ligeia.
    Here is some foreshadowing to the future events that are about to take place. The narrator connects Ligeia to a passage about death being the result the weak will. This passage could suggest that death is a matter of "choice" and one could defy it if they were determined enough to do so.

    An intensity in thought, action, or speech, was possibly, in her, a result, or at least an index, of that gigantic volition which, during our long intercourse, failed to give other and more immediate evidence of its existence. Of all the women whom I have ever known, she, the outwardly calm, the ever-placid Ligeia, was the most violently a prey to the tumultuous vultures of stern passion.
    This is an interesting passage, the way in which Ligeia is contradicited in the eyes of the narrator. He speaks of how calm and placid she is, and yet speaksof her grea, and violent passion.

    What do you think this intensity within Ligeia is intended to tell the reader? The way in which she is portrayed to us here.

    Also, interesting use of the word vulture here.

    And of such passion I could form no estimate, save by the miraculous expansion of those eyes which at once so delighted and appalled me --by the almost magical melody, modulation, distinctness and placidity of her very low voice --and by the fierce energy (rendered doubly effective by contrast with her manner of utterance) of the wild words which she habitually uttered.
    Once more he draws attention to the strange qaulity of her eyes. He also again brings up that musial quality that her voice holds.

    Wild words habittually uttered with such fierce energy, makes one think, of almost a chant of some sort, particuarly when paired with the strange and mysterious, occultic nature of her learning.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  3. #78
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    Quote from Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe:
    --And the will therein lieth, which dieth not. Who knoweth the mysteries of the will, with its vigor? For God is but a great will pervading all things by nature of its intentness. Man doth not yield him to the angels, nor unto death utterly, save only through the weakness of his feeble will.

    Length of years, and subsequent reflection, have enabled me to trace, indeed, some remote connection between this passage in the English moralist and a portion of the character of Ligeia.

    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-14-2008, 02:16 PM
    Here is some foreshadowing to the future events that are about to take place. The narrator connects Ligeia to a passage about death being the result the weak will. This passage could suggest that death is a matter of "choice" and one could defy it if they were determined enough to do so.
    I agree with Dark Muse. It is foreshadowing the end of the story. If death comes over a person just because of his/her WEAK will then death can be overcome by a person with a STRONG will. I believe that is the supernatural aspect of his writing. Ligeia does not like some things (the narrator’s marrying again, Lady Rowena not treating the narrator with the same love that she had, or even the vastness of death) she returned to the narrator. However, due to his drug use and stress (from Ligeia’s death and Rowena’s withholding affection), he is unreliable. Since the story ends at the moment Ligeia returns, we are left with filling in our own imagination. The gift that keeps on giving.
    The references to ‘violence’ and ‘vultures’ is a way for the readers to believe the ending as it is written. I disagree with Jozanny. Poe does present the idea that Ligeia preyed upon Rowena and this passage is just another piece of evidence.

    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-14-2008, 02:16 PM
    … the way in which Ligeia is contradicited in the eyes of the narrator. He speaks of how calm and placid she is, and yet speaksof her grea, and violent passion.

    What do you think this intensity within Ligeia is intended to tell the reader? The way in which she is portrayed to us here.
    I think the intensity of Ligeia is another form of foreshadowing. If Poe does not show that Ligeia is ‘passionate’ about some things (and calm about others) then we will not believe that she is willing to return from the supernatural world to protect, love, and speak to her husband whom she loves deeply.
    LC Lancer
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    I saw no Heaven- but in her eyes.

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  4. #79
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    You make some very interesting observations, and I agree with most of what you said. Though there is one thing of which I am not completely convinved about. When it comes to Rowenea, I do not think all the blame can be placed upon her. I do not see the Husband/Narrator as being the complete vicitim of her lact of affection. I had the impression from the begining that he never really cared for.

    In fact, at one point, he even admonishes the parents that for money they would allow thier daughter to marry such a man as he.

    Where were the souls of the haughty family of the bride, when through thrist of gold, they premitted to pass the threshold of an apartment so bedecked, a maiden and a daughter so beloved?
    and than it says

    The may wife dreaded the fierce moodiness of my temper-she shunned me and loved me but little-I could not help preceiving; but it gave me rather pleasure than otherwise. I loathed her with a hatred belonging more to demon than to man.
    It seems they are equal in thier feelings to each other, and he can take some of the blame for her lack of affection for him.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  5. #80
    The Poetic Warrior Dark Muse's Avatar
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    You may feel free to comment and dicuss anything above, but I am going to post the next segment of the text

    I have spoken of the learning of Ligeia: it was immense --such as I have never known in woman. In the classical tongues was she deeply proficient, and as far as my own acquaintance extended in regard to the modern dialects of Europe, I have never known her at fault. Indeed upon any theme of the most admired, because simply the most abstruse of the boasted erudition of the academy, have I ever found Ligeia at fault? How singularly --how thrillingly, this one point in the nature of my wife has forced itself, at this late period only, upon my attention! I said her knowledge was such as I have never known in woman --but where breathes the man who has traversed, and successfully, all the wide areas of moral, physical, and mathematical science? I saw not then what I now clearly perceive, that the acquisitions of Ligeia were gigantic, were astounding; yet I was sufficiently aware of her infinite supremacy to resign myself, with a child-like confidence, to her guidance through the chaotic world of metaphysical investigation at which I was most busily occupied during the earlier years of our marriage. With how vast a triumph --with how vivid a delight --with how much of all that is ethereal in hope --did I feel, as she bent over me in studies but little sought --but less known --that delicious vista by slow degrees expanding before me, down whose long, gorgeous, and all untrodden path, I might at length pass onward to the goal of a wisdom too divinely precious not to be forbidden!

    How poignant, then, must have been the grief with which, after some years, I beheld my well-grounded expectations take wings to themselves and fly away! Without Ligeia I was but as a child groping benighted. Her presence, her readings alone, rendered vividly luminous the many mysteries of the transcendentalism in which we were immersed. Wanting the radiant lustre of her eyes, letters, lambent and golden, grew duller than Saturnian lead. And now those eyes shone less and less frequently upon the pages over which I pored. Ligeia grew ill. The wild eyes blazed with a too --too glorious effulgence; the pale fingers became of the transparent waxen hue of the grave, and the blue veins upon the lofty forehead swelled and sank impetuously with the tides of the gentle emotion. I saw that she must die --and I struggled desperately in spirit with the grim Azrael. And the struggles of the passionate wife were, to my astonishment, even more energetic than my own. There had been much in her stern nature to impress me with the belief that, to her, death would have come without its terrors; --but not so. Words are impotent to convey any just idea of the fierceness of resistance with which she wrestled with the Shadow. I groaned in anguish at the pitiable spectacle. would have soothed --I would have reasoned; but, in the intensity of her wild desire for life, --for life --but for life --solace and reason were the uttermost folly. Yet not until the last instance, amid the most convulsive writhings of her fierce spirit, was shaken the external placidity of her demeanor. Her voice grew more gentle --grew more low --yet I would not wish to dwell upon the wild meaning of the quietly uttered words. My brain reeled as I hearkened entranced, to a melody more than mortal --to assumptions and aspirations which mortality had never before known.
    Here it speaks a little more about the learning of Ligeia which the narrator had touched on breifly before. And it begins to move into the event which will lead to the death of Ligeia. As well the passion, love and relationship between the two can be viewed here.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  6. #81
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    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-18-2008, 12:04 PM
    When it comes to Rowenea, I do not think all the blame can be placed upon her. I do not see the Husband/Narrator as being the complete vicitim of her lact of affection.
    And
    It seems they are equal in thier feelings to each other, and he can take some of the blame for her lack of affection for him.
    I agree that he should shoulder some of the blame for her lack of affection from the very passage you quoted. However, the reasons she loathes him are not clear. It may have been she blames her parents for the marriage and directs her anger toward the narrator. Or she is disappointed that he is ‘moody’ after they were married and did not show it before. Or she just hates opium and all those who use it. There is no indication how long they knew each other before they were married.


    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-18-2008, 12:04 PM
    In fact, at one point, he even admonishes the parents that for money they would allow thier daughter to marry such a man as he.
    I interpreted the passage that her parents were so pre-occupied with their own gold and interests that they did not see him for the man he actually was: heart-broken, addicted, and in morning. They may have seen his gold and his handyman skills, but failed to see beyond that.

    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-18-2008, 12:04 PM
    I had the impression from the begining that he never really cared for.”
    He only describes her as “the fair-haired, the blue-eyed” so we know that she looked different from Ligeia. However, I cannot rule out that if he thought it was a mistake to marry Rowena that he might take it out on her. He grew to loathe her in a short amount of time. That would indicate that she presented a persona that changed after the wedding, or we craved the same attention as Ligeia gave him and was disappointed. He may have “never really cared for” Rowena, but I get the feeling that he does not find her as mentally stimulating as Ligeia. Sometimes people marry too quickly after the death/divorce/dissertation and they grow to despise the new groom/bride. That begs the question, as to why he married Rowena .

    Again he compares his wife to unworldly things, but this time he is using a negative reference of “demon”.

    Back to the point, I was trying to indicate that he was under stress and Roweana withholding love (and affection) from him was just another stressor he was looking through as he told the story.
    LC Lancer
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    My breast her shield in wintry weather-
    And when the friendly sunshine smil'd,
    And she would mark the opening skies,
    I saw no Heaven- but in her eyes.

    Tamerlane

  7. #82
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    I always found his marrige to Rowena to be currious as well. Though I never got the impression that she was witholding affection from him. To me it always just seemed as if he were pushing her away. It does not seem as if he ever sought to have a true relationship with her.

    He clearly did not marry her for money, sense his own wealth is what sealed her marraige to him, so his reasons for the marraige remain a mystery.

    Quote Originally Posted by LC_Lancer View Post
    Again he compares his wife to unworldly things, but this time he is using a negative reference of “demon”.
    Yes, though here the word demon he acutally uses to describe himself. He says that the hatred he felt for Rowena was more like what a demon would feel than a man.

    As for Rowena's feelings for him, it does seem that the parents arranged the marraige for the sake of the his wealth, so it may not have been her choice to wed him, and in addtion to his temper which frightens her, and the rather macabe chamber he keeps her in. It states that he would often call out Ligeia's name alloud in the night. I could imagine no woman is won over when her husband continues to speak the name of another woman, even if she is dead.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  8. #83
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    Originally Posted by LC_Lancer
    Again he compares his wife to unworldly things, but this time he is using a negative reference of “demon”.

    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-18-2008 at 03:23 PM.
    Yes, though here the word demon he acutally uses to describe himself. He says that the hatred he felt for Rowena was more like what a demon would feel than a man.
    Ok, I can see that. I miss read it. So let me amend what I wrote: the narrator uses supernatural references for both of his wives. The one he loves, he uses ‘glowing and loving’ citations and for the one he loathes, he uses a negative allusion.
    It shows the reader just how much he dislikes his second wife. I presume he did not want to get married and some how the family ‘made’ him into it. The reason(s) are not mentioned at all. It could have been a way to a debt (money or opium) or maybe the parents just wanted her out of the house and he was available.

    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-18-2008 at 03:23 PM.
    Though I never got the impression that she was witholding affection from him.
    I took the word ‘little’ to mean “not that much” in the line “[Rowena] shunned me and loved me but little”. I interpreted that she did show him affection (at night, maybe), but withheld the other types of affection. I think he craved the same affection and attention that Ligeia gave him. That might cause his ‘loathing’ for Rowena.
    LC Lancer
    ____________________________________________
    My breast her shield in wintry weather-
    And when the friendly sunshine smil'd,
    And she would mark the opening skies,
    I saw no Heaven- but in her eyes.

    Tamerlane

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by LC_Lancer View Post
    I took the word ‘little’ to mean “not that much” in the line “[Rowena] shunned me and loved me but little”. I interpreted that she did show him affection (at night, maybe), but withheld the other types of affection. I think he craved the same affection and attention that Ligeia gave him. That might cause his ‘loathing’ for Rowena.
    Well the way I read it, I got the impression that the way she acted towrd him was a direct result of how he treated her. That his treatment to her is what caused her to shun him in the first place.

    she shunned me and loved me but little-I could not help preceiving; but it gave me rather pleasure than otherwise. I loathed her with a hatred belonging more to demon than to man
    The way it says that her shunning him gave him pleasure suggests that he never cared for her. Not that her inattention to him caused his feelings.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  10. #85
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    from Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe
    in a moment of mental alienation, I led from the altar as my bride --as the successor of the unforgotten Ligeia --the fair-haired and blue-eyed Lady Rowena Trevanion, of Tremaine.
    I don’t know if he NEVER could stand her or grew to loathe her. The quote above indicated that he may have been out of his mind when he married her.

    He could have realized that he was married to her or the circumstances of the marriage "hit home" THEN he began to loathe her.

    This might also account for his “the fierce moodiness” of his temper, his regret, and opium use.


    The quote: “I could not help preceiving; but it gave me rather pleasure than otherwise” may have been the narrator coming to the realization that he made a mistake and wanted nothing from Rowena. If he expected nothing, and got nothing from Lady Rowena, then he would get pleasure.
    LC Lancer
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    My breast her shield in wintry weather-
    And when the friendly sunshine smil'd,
    And she would mark the opening skies,
    I saw no Heaven- but in her eyes.

    Tamerlane

  11. #86
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    But if he was not really in his right mind when he married her, than I do not think you can really say that he truly really did care for her at any point of time. Maybe he did not acutally hater her initially, but I do not think we are ever meant to belive that he had at any point loved her.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Muse View Post
    I do not think we are ever meant to belive that he had at any point loved her.
    I agree. However, since we are not told the details of the events before the marriage we cannot rule out "he truly really did care for her at any point of time" all together either.
    LC Lancer
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    My breast her shield in wintry weather-
    And when the friendly sunshine smil'd,
    And she would mark the opening skies,
    I saw no Heaven- but in her eyes.

    Tamerlane

  13. #88
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    I have spoken of the learning of Ligeia: it was immense --such as I have never known in woman. In the classical tongues was she deeply proficient, and as far as my own acquaintance extended in regard to the modern dialects of Europe, I have never known her at fault. Indeed upon any theme of the most admired, because simply the most abstruse of the boasted erudition of the academy, have I ever found Ligeia at fault? How singularly --how thrillingly, this one point in the nature of my wife has forced itself, at this late period only, upon my attention! I said her knowledge was such as I have never known in woman --but where breathes the man who has traversed, and successfully, all the wide areas of moral, physical, and mathematical science?
    Though we have already touched upon some of this before. I thought it would be worth mentioning again here as it does offer an interesting reflection within the story.

    The learning of Ligiea I think is an imporant part of this story in a few different ways. For one thing it offers up more of a mystery about Ligeia to the reader which can than lend one to speculate more upon the end of the story. As we can see here how truly she was not an ordinary woman.

    It also offers a deeper look into the love which he felt for her. As well there is nothing really unique about a man be enamoured with a beautiful woman. But here we are show Ligeia was more than just that, and he loved her for more than her physical beauty. He also loved her for her mind.

    The other interesting thing is the particular subjects which are mentioned here.

    --but where breathes the man who has traversed, and successfully, all the wide areas of moral, physical, and mathematical science?
    A woman who is said to be masteful over subjects that even today are seen to me more male dominated? And even more so during the time in which the story was written. The odds are, not many women of the day would have even been educated in these subjects, even if she did come from a wealthy family. And furhter more, that such a woman would be loved for this very reason? Most men would have looked down upon a woman who entered such feilds of study.

    I saw not then what I now clearly perceive, that the acquisitions of Ligeia were gigantic, were astounding; yet I was sufficiently aware of her infinite supremacy to resign myself, with a child-like confidence, to her guidance through the chaotic world of metaphysical investigation at which I was most busily occupied during the earlier years of our marriage.
    I find the use of the word "gigantic" here to be intentinally placed and perhaps so suggest other things, beyond just her learning. It is an interesting word choice and I think it suggests just how powerful the pressence of Ligeia truly was.

    Also interesting how Ligeia here is cast in a mother like role. He dipicts himself as a child while she is seen as surperior to him. He is a new born in her hands and she can help to shape his mind.

    With how vast a triumph --with how vivid a delight --with how much of all that is ethereal in hope --did I feel, as she bent over me in studies but little sought --but less known --that delicious vista by slow degrees expanding before me, down whose long, gorgeous, and all untrodden path, I might at length pass onward to the goal of a wisdom too divinely precious not to be forbidden!
    I think this offers more foreshadow to the story, as well, it begins to steep Ligeia in further mystery, as he begins to speak of her learning as if it was something beyond "normal" that she presued subjects which could suggest the supernatural.

    expanding before me, down whose long, gorgeous, and all untrodden path, I might at length pass onward to the goal of a wisdom too divinely precious not to be forbidden!
    I just have to say, I think this right here is truly beautiful writing. It is so vivid and lush.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

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    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-19-2008, 07:33 PM
    The learning of Ligiea I think is an imporant part of this story in a few different ways. For one thing it offers up more of a mystery about Ligeia to the reader which can than lend one to speculate more upon the end of the story. As we can see here how truly she was not an ordinary woman.
    It also offers a deeper look into the love which he felt for her.
    I also think this is important, but not for a supernatural ending. It solidifies in the reader that Ligeia’s mind is the true thing the narrator loves, not just her physical aspects.
    ___


    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-19-2008, 07:33 PM
    … there is nothing really unique about a man be enamoured with a beautiful woman. But here we are show Ligeia was more than just that, and he loved her for more than her physical beauty. He also loved her for her mind.”
    I agree that it is not uncommon for a man to be smitten with a beautiful woman, but it is not out of the question that a man can be drawn to woman for more than her beauty. I think it is important for the reader to feel that the narrator will never find another woman to compare with Ligeia or more importantly her mind. I can identify with his devotion and desire for ALL aspects of one particular woman.
    ___


    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-19-2008, 07:33 PM
    A woman who is said to be masteful over subjects that even today are seen to me more male dominated? And even more so during the time in which the story was written. The odds are, not many women of the day would have even been educated in these subjects, even if she did come from a wealthy family. And furhter more, that such a woman would be loved for this very reason? Most men would have looked down upon a woman who entered such feilds of study.”
    The terms ‘male dominated’ and ‘Most men’ indicate that some women were studying those subjects and that some men are accepting of a woman studying those subjects. Those men who “looked down upon a woman” that studies the subjects as Ligeia did, get exactly what they deserve.
    I think Poe had another reason to include another description of Ligeia’s mind and education. It is to show the reader that the narrator is accepting of Ligeia’s taking control of Lady Rowena and he will love her just as deep as he did years before.
    Remember the narrator is writing this after Ligeia has already returned to this world. Thus she could have told him the way she arrived back to him and mentioned that she used some of her knowledge. His admiration of her mind could be from the fact that she did accomplish the impossible with just the strength of her mind. The descriptions of her education and her mind are to show us that he is centered on that aspect of her.
    ___


    Quote from Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe
    I saw not then what I now clearly perceive, that the acquisitions of Ligeia were gigantic, were astounding; yet I was sufficiently aware of her infinite supremacy to resign myself, with a child-like confidence, to her guidance through the chaotic world of metaphysical investigation at which I was most busily occupied during the earlier years of our marriage.
    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-19-2008, 07:33 PM
    I find the use of the word "gigantic" here to be intentinally placed and perhaps so suggest other things, beyond just her learning. It is an interesting word choice and I think it suggests just how powerful the pressence of Ligeia truly was.
    I agree. Since he is writing this story after Ligeia returned, it could be that he is firmly convinced that her mind alone united them. We also do not know how many years after her return he decided to write this.
    ___


    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-19-2008, 07:33 PM
    Also interesting how Ligeia here is cast in a mother like role. He dipicts himself as a child while she is seen as surperior to him. He is a new born in her hands and she can help to shape his mind.
    Powerful women have been ‘shaping’ a man’s mind for as long as there has been marriage. He depends on her tremendously to teach, guide, and reward him for his studies. I think she takes her job seriously. He wrote, “she bent over me in studies but little sought...” I interpret that to mean that she came to him to see how his studies were going and if he was doing it right. I hesitate to think of how she would reward him if he was correct. I am even more cautious to think of how she would chastise him if he was incorrect.
    ___


    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-19-2008, 07:33 PM
    I think this offers more foreshadow to the story, as well, it begins to steep Ligeia in further mystery, as he begins to speak of her learning as if it was something beyond "normal" that she presued subjects which could suggest the supernatural.
    Not only supernatural, but perhaps even his fears. He might even fear her knowledge ‘as a child’. If she could take control of another woman who was already dead, and find him after several years and hundreds of miles (or kilometers in Europe), then he might be frightened of her.
    ___


    Quote from Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe
    With how vast a triumph --with how vivid a delight --with how much of all that is ethereal in hope --did I feel, as she bent over me in studies but little sought --but less known --that delicious vista by slow degrees expanding before me, down whose long, gorgeous, and all untrodden path, I might at length pass onward to the goal of a wisdom too divinely precious not to be forbidden!
    Originally Posted by Dark Muse on 09-19-2008, 07:33 PM
    I just have to say, I think this right here is truly beautiful writing. It is so vivid and lush.
    Here, Here!! That is a lovely way to write that the narrator felt that he could do anything with Ligeia by his side.
    LC Lancer
    ____________________________________________
    My breast her shield in wintry weather-
    And when the friendly sunshine smil'd,
    And she would mark the opening skies,
    I saw no Heaven- but in her eyes.

    Tamerlane

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    Quote Originally Posted by LC_Lancer View Post
    The terms ‘male dominated’ and ‘Most men’ indicate that some women were studying those subjects and that some men are accepting of a woman studying those subjects. Those men who “looked down upon a woman” that studies the subjects as Ligeia did, get exactly what they deserve.
    Yes, I do not like to talk in absolutes. I know there is always some exepction to the rule. There were women who did breach these subjects, and there were men who were more of a liberal mind. But it is still uncommon enough, to make it something of a twist within the story. That the story is about more than just a physcially beautiful woman.

    Quote Originally Posted by LC_Lancer View Post
    I think Poe had another reason to include another description of Ligeia’s mind and education. It is to show the reader that the narrator is accepting of Ligeia’s taking control of Lady Rowena and he will love her just as deep as he did years before.
    I am not entirely convinved of this. Though as you know I am not completely sold on the idea that Ligeia, litteraly does take over Rowena's body at the end. Supposing that is what happend, if you look at the end, he is not exzactly overjoyed when he discovers what has happend. The end of the story does not seem to indicate that he completely embraces the idea that she comes back to him from beyond the grave.

    I agree. Since he is writing this story after Ligeia returned, it could be that he is firmly convinced that her mind alone united them. We also do not know how many years after her return he decided to write this.

    Quote Originally Posted by LC_Lancer View Post
    Powerful women have been ‘shaping’ a man’s mind for as long as there has been marriage. He depends on her tremendously to teach, guide, and reward him for his studies. I think she takes her job seriously. He wrote, “she bent over me in studies but little sought...” I interpret that to mean that she came to him to see how his studies were going and if he was doing it right. I hesitate to think of how she would reward him if he was correct. I am even more cautious to think of how she would chastise him if he was incorrect.
    With this passage about him being like a child to Ligeia, I cannot help but to wonder if Poe was thinking of his own mother here, and put some of her into Ligeia with the making of this story. As he was deeply effected by her death.

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

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