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Thread: canterbury tales

  1. #31
    Maybe YesNo's Avatar
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    Cortazar sounds interesting. A short story online could be translated by Google. I would also be interested in online audios of these stories.

  2. #32
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    I miss the combination of written and audio record you have on your blog here on Litnet.

    Well, here is a translation of the tale "Cefaleia" by him.

    https://www.tor.com/2014/09/03/headache/

    And "Axolotl":

    http://southerncrossreview.org/73/axolotl.html
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  3. #33
    Maybe YesNo's Avatar
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    They sound interesting. I've heard of the author. I'll read them later this evening or tomorrow morning. Thanks for finding them!

  4. #34
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    I read "Axolotl". There is little action except the the main character turns into an axolotl which is fantastical. They are cute. I watched a YouTube video on them and I can see how someone would find them fascinating.

  5. #35
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    I like the story. I think it may also be about the identification with a creature that´s very different.

    I never saw a real axolotl. There is something unprotected about the one in the picture.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  6. #36
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    I liked the story also. I can see how one might identify with them more than with other primates as the story suggested. There is something about the eyes and the movements of the arms and legs that seem human-like or fairy-like. Although the story had a conclusion that I don't think can happen, the empathy leading up to that conclusion seems real.

  7. #37
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    I think the conclusion is phantastic. I like how Cortazar blends the real and the phantastic in his stories.

    I found this links with stories by Cortazar and Borges. Unfortunately it is in Spanish:

    https://culturacolectiva.com/letras/...e-luis-borges/

    Some of my favorite Cortazar short stories: Casa tomada, Lejana (somewhat similar to Axolotl),Omnibus, Continuidad de los parques, Cartas de mamá, Las babas del diablo, La salud de los enfermos.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  8. #38
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    La salud de los enfermos sounds interesting. I'll see if I can make sense out of it without too much reference to Google Translate.

  9. #39
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    You love a paradox, Yes/No!
    Last edited by Danik 2016; 10-01-2017 at 10:42 AM.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  10. #40
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    So far the story is interesting and the title does seem paradoxical. Is there any copyright issues with creating translations? Perhaps not, I don't know.

  11. #41
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    I just remembered a German film, who stages a similar situation as Cortazár's story.
    https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/good_bye_lenin/

    I notice we have strayed somewhat from the Canterbury Tales. If we go on with Cortazar I will open a new thread for him.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  12. #42
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    I would be interested in a new thread on Cortazar. I have only read two stories by him so far. I noticed that the library has two collections of stories by him in English.

    Good Bye, Lenin is in the library, but checked out.

  13. #43
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    For reading facility I´m posting the link again:

    https://culturacolectiva.com/letras/...e-luis-borges/
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  14. #44
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    I started reading Canterbury Tales. I was a bit surprised. 1) It is the modern English version by John Dryden. I suppose I should have checked before buying it. I may have had to work too hard at understanding Mediaeval English to enjoy it in the time I want to allocate to it. Reading some of the above comments makes me feel like I opted for the 5K fun run rather than the half-marathon, but TBF, I did not bother reading Anna Karenina in Russian. 2) I probably should have expected this, but I didn't, it's all in verse. It all reminds me of Andrew Marvell's poem, To His Coy Mistress:

    Had we but world enough and time
    This coyness lady would be no crime
    We would sit down and think which way
    To walk and pass our lon love's day
    Te tum te tum te tum te tum
    Te tum te tum te tum te tum

    Pages and pages and pages of it. It's pretty good rhyming and quite pleasant so far.

    Edit: Actually, it is not quite like that poem because the verse is ten syllables per line. The old iambic pentameter I suppose.
    Last edited by kev67; 01-04-2018 at 04:37 PM.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

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