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Thread: teaching classic british lit to 9th graders

  1. #31
    mind your back chasestalling's Avatar
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    try t.s. eliot's the love song of j. alfred prufrock and henry jame's the american.

  2. #32
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    What age is 9th grade? Pardon my foreign ignorance.

  3. #33
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Ennison you got there before me. was about to ask same question!
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasestalling View Post
    try t.s. eliot's the love song of j. alfred prufrock and henry jame's the american.
    T.S. Eliot?

    Expatriates count then?

    9th graders are around 14 or 15 years old.

    How about Waiting for Godot? That play can be fantastic assuming one teaches from the proper "mind/body," linguistic perspective rather than the over-simplified, dullard's "Waiting for God" version.

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    Unless these are 14 year-old-bookworms with tremendous powers of self-discipline then 'Ivanhoe' is not suitable material. Are you punishing them? Nearly all writers put together hack work and second-rate stuff (By their own standards if no one else's). 'Ivanhoe' not one of his best and even his best is heavy-going for all but the most exceptional of 14-year-olds.

  6. #36
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Well that says everything. I was starting to think 9th graders were about 16/17.
    No dont go for waiting for godot. Besides that Irish not British. Do the hobbit! They would enjoy that. I'm sure most of them saw Lotr and might enjoy reading it.
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
    Artemins Fowl and the Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer


    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niamh View Post
    Well that says everything. I was starting to think 9th graders were about 16/17.
    No dont go for waiting for godot. Besides that Irish not British. Do the hobbit! They would enjoy that. I'm sure most of them saw Lotr and might enjoy reading it.
    Ireland is part of Britain, and included in Brit-Lit. courses.

  8. #38
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Ireland is not apart of britain and hasnt been since 1948 when we got our independence for the first time in 800 years.
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
    Artemins Fowl and the Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer


    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niamh View Post
    Ireland is not apart of britain and hasnt been since 1948 when we got our independence for the first time in 800 years.
    Sorry, sorry, I was actually about to go back and edit. Because Samuel Beckett was born before Ireland gained independence, he is of British origins and therefore a British author.

  10. #40
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    No hes classed as an Irish Author even though he was born during english reign. But he started writing when ireland was a free state and only a member of the common wealth. 1948 was when ireland was officially recognised as an independant country but we had been indepentant in the twenties and had stayed neutral during the second world war. (am i right Ennison?)
    Samuel; Beckett also won the nobel prize for literature for ireland.
    Even to the british Ireland was always Ireland. a pain in there side! any writers born in Ireland pre Irish literary revival are classed as British, and Irish. Northern ireland on the other hand is still apart of britain.
    Last edited by Niamh; 12-16-2006 at 11:27 AM.
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
    Artemins Fowl and the Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer


    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ennison View Post
    Unless these are 14 year-old-bookworms with tremendous powers of self-discipline then 'Ivanhoe' is not suitable material. Are you punishing them? Nearly all writers put together hack work and second-rate stuff (By their own standards if no one else's). 'Ivanhoe' not one of his best and even his best is heavy-going for all but the most exceptional of 14-year-olds.
    I'm compelled to get in on this discussion since I'm required to teach Ivanhoe. And while I'm not familiar enough with Sir Walter Scott's 'other' writing to judge whether it's second-rate or not, I can attest to the fact that 9th graders indeed struggle with the book. Even if I can get them stirred up a bit with the notion of chivalry and the excitement of the tournament, they get buried in the language. I've taken to teaching only the Tournament at Ashby segment to my lower-level students, and I teach it in conjunction with viewing a film version. Still, it's a "slow-go"...yet it's a curriculum requirement.

  12. #42
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jolly McJollyso View Post
    Ireland is part of Britain, and included in Brit-Lit. courses.
    I dont understand why irish Lit is being included as brit Lit. I mean you wouldn't say belgian lit was french or french was spanish would you? no because you would class them as european.
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
    Artemins Fowl and the Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer


    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

  13. #43
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    It's because Ireland is part of the British Isles (though not part of the modern UK) and also because Irish literature abroad is simply seen (naturally enough) as an extension of English literature. We wont get upset about that you and I.

  14. #44
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    i get very defensive. dont know why though.

    i saw something on the news or in a news paper recently that they are going to stop using the term British isles because it is now seen as policically incorrect as ireland is no longer a part of britain. cant remember for the life of me were i heard it though.
    Last edited by Niamh; 12-16-2006 at 07:53 PM.
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
    Artemins Fowl and the Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer


    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

  15. #45
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    Well unless it all sinks below the Atlantic we are here!! I'm glad you are.

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