View Poll Results: Do you like Harry Potter?

Voters
209. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    163 77.99%
  • No

    46 22.01%
Page 8 of 37 FirstFirst ... 34567891011121318 ... LastLast
Results 106 to 120 of 551

Thread: Harry Potter

  1. #106
    Voice of Chaos & Anarchy
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    In one of the branches of the multiverse, but I don't know which one.
    Posts
    7,012
    Blog Entries
    438
    Quote Originally Posted by Apotropaic
    There! That's what I'm talking about! Judge her fairly, please!
    Then you agree that she is a very good writer. OK

  2. #107
    Voice of Chaos & Anarchy
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    In one of the branches of the multiverse, but I don't know which one.
    Posts
    7,012
    Blog Entries
    438
    Quote Originally Posted by LightShade
    PeterL, pray fantasy fans out there don't read what you wrote about her being a star in the fantasy writing field
    It wouldn't bother a bit if they read it. Those "fantasy" books are only literature by virtue of being words on paper. They are without plot or theme, mere;y massive collections of characterizations and events that go no where.

  3. #108
    apprentice LightShade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lost
    Posts
    29
    PeterL, the fantasy genre is HUGE. There are great writings there, and even some of the bad ones that I have read had "plot" or "theme". I don't understand your position.

    Are you sure you didn't mean "fairy tales"?
    not entirely sane and damn proud of it

  4. #109
    Voice of Chaos & Anarchy
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    In one of the branches of the multiverse, but I don't know which one.
    Posts
    7,012
    Blog Entries
    438
    Quote Originally Posted by LightShade
    PeterL, the fantasy genre is HUGE. There are great writings there, and even some of the bad ones that I have read had "plot" or "theme". I don't understand your position.

    Are you sure you didn't mean "fairy tales"?
    I certainly didn't mean "fairy tales". I meant the multivolume medaevalish sword, sorcery, and romance things. There is also a huge amount of good 'fantasy' from Dunsany to Tolkein to de Camp and LeGuin. I contrast that George R.R. Martin, Tad and others.
    I just looked at a list of "fantasy" writers and found many authors listed who are very good writers, who know when a story has ended. An endless series of episodes do not make good literature.

  5. #110
    loquacious cat mrawr
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,020
    Chava, Pratchett also wrote some children's books
    yes, i know that, but i find that his discworrld series has a wonderful ploy when it concerns being child friendly or utterly mature. It's lovely! has anyone read his "Soul Music"??

  6. #111
    deciphering the codes Apotropaic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterL
    ...[Fantasy books] are without plot or theme, mere;y massive collections of characterizations and events that go no where.

    ...There is also a huge amount of good 'fantasy' from Dunsany to Tolkein to de Camp and LeGuin. I contrast that George R.R. Martin, Tad and others.

    I just looked at a list of "fantasy" writers and found many authors listed who are very good writers, who know when a story has ended. An endless series of episodes do not make good literature.
    Umm... I don't understand what you're talking about. You keep jumping from anti-fantasy books to pro-fantasy, then back to anti. Are you critcizing the books and praising the authors??
    go to sleep

  7. #112
    apprentice LightShade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lost
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by Chava
    yes, i know that, but i find that his discworrld series has a wonderful ploy when it concerns being child friendly or utterly mature. It's lovely! has anyone read his "Soul Music"??
    I agree, the series can be read at many levels and every person will understand (or not) the various subtleties based on his/her previous experience. And even if you don't get most of them, the stories are still thoroughly enjoyable.

    I read all his Discworld books up to Night Watch and I am currently re-reading them for what would be the third or fourth time in some cases. And sometimes, as it happens when you re-read a book after some time, I see things and characters in a new light. I love that.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterL
    An endless series of episodes do not make good literature.
    Definitely. One has to know when to stop, otherwise it becomes rather boring and possibly too thinly stretched.

    I see you have reconsidered your position as to the fantasy genre in general. I'm glad we finally agree on the subject.

    Now, not to be totally off-topic: has anybody read the latest HP book? how did you find it? (I am looking for opinions as to plot, character development and general writing style. Please have good arguments to back up your opinion ).

    ps - I haven't read it yet, I'm waiting for the paperback and I wish she'd stop writing such big books, they cost a lot
    not entirely sane and damn proud of it

  8. #113
    String Dancer Shea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    1,931
    Okay, here's my crack at this.

    After reading 7 pages of this thread, I come to 2 interesting conclusions. First, it appears that all the English majors (including myself) are in support of the HP books. Second, I was shocked that no one has brought up the fact that much of the inspiration has come from Mythology and classic literary themes.

    Like Logos, if something is wildly popular, I'm likely not to be interested either. Early on while persuing my degree, I established the fact that the closer I get to the 20th century, the less likely I am to enjoy a piece. But I've also found that if I can make comparisons to older classics, I tend to like them (hence my thorough enjoyment of Tolkein). Initially, I condemned the books for religious reasons but then decided that wasn't fair, as I hadn't read them yet. I began reading them after the fourth one came out and found that they were no more harmful than Lord of the Rings or Narnia. Then I began my degree. I was happy to discover numerous parallels between the HP series and classic works of lit, and this was only enhanced by mythology classes.

    THEN! At Cambridge this past summer, I took a class on Dickens and another on the Bronte sisters, both taught by the same professor. She expressed the same observations that I had on the HP books (at the time she was comparing the orphan state of Oliver Twist to Harry), and she said that the only reason that she hadn't read the new one was because her daughter hadn't finished it yet. She felt the same as myself that Rowling was quite brilliant for introducing these themes and ideas to children in such an entertaining way that they can more easily identify them later in life while they read more challenging works. I even experienced this for myself. I had never heard of a Basilisk until reading The Chamber of Secrets. For a while I thought she just made up the creature. Then I ran across it while reading for one of my classes. I read the footnote for curiosities sake, but really it wasn't necessary. I already thoroughly knew what a Basilisk was because of Rowling.

    Lightshade, perhaps this is why the characters seem so archetypal to you. But even so, I don't think any of the HP characters are nearly as flat as the classic character of Oliver Twist.

    About the writing, what I've said above I think must be taken into consideration. Also in agreement to what Apotropaic said about not comparing to Dickens because it's from a different time period I wanted to add: while taking those classes in England, I discovered that a good knowledge of the history of society at that time (Dickens' or Brontes') is necessary in order to fully understand the meaning behind the ideas presented in a novel or even the language. Children (and most adults) don't generally know what happened during Dickens lifetime. They obviously know our own societal issues better and so can adhere to the HP books better. I also believe that the series follows the Dickens and Bronte example of trying to identify and change problems in our society. This leads me to an interesting example.

    I found it ironic that many of the people complaining about the books also complained about kids being glued to the TV. Look at Dudley! Rowling has recognized the very issue brought up here, and personified it in one of her more rotten characters that no normal child would want to emulate!

    Anyway, as a soon-to-be English teacher, I'm quite glad the books have been so poplular as I'll be refering to them from time to time during my classes for the reasons stated above.

    sorry it's so long.
    Hwt! We Gar-Dena in geardagum,/eodcuninga rum gefrunon,/hu a elingas ellen fremedon!
    Oft Scyld Scefing sceaena reatum,/ monegum mgum, meodosetla ofteah,/ egsode eorlas, syan rest wear/ feasceaft funden; he s frofre gebad,/ weox under wolcnum, weormyndum ah,/ ot him ghwylc ara ymbsittendra/ofer hronrade hyran scolde,/gomban gyldan. t ws god cyning!

  9. #114
    apprentice LightShade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lost
    Posts
    29
    Shea, I read many, MANY fairy tales and mythological tales when I was a kid. So I approached the HP books with that knowledge already installed but no, that's not the reason for my seeing the characters as archetypal - I wasn't referring to dragons and suchlike. I was referring to Harry & his buddies & his enemies.

    I don't think any of the HP characters are nearly as flat as the classic character of Oliver Twist.
    It's been some time since I read Oliver Twist. To make a fair judgment now, I'd have to read it again and I don't really feel like it. I wasn't saying classics didn't use archetypes - when I was at the University we studied flat characters in literary theory class using examples from classic English writers And I remember an exam where I had to write an essay concerning D.H.Lawrence's use of archetypes it was pretty obvious he did use such characters. (btw, I got mark 10 (an A, for US students) )

    In any case, you may start with an archetypal character, but you have to work towards giving it more dimensions than the archetypal flat one. I fail to see that in Harry.
    not entirely sane and damn proud of it

  10. #115
    Pice de Rsistance Scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Tweet @ScherLitNet
    Posts
    23,903
    Maybe Harry Potter books are like Marmite: You either love it or hate it !

    Last edited by Scheherazade; 11-09-2005 at 12:09 PM.
    ~
    "It is not that I am mad; it is only that my head is different from yours.
    ~


  11. #116
    The Yodfather Stanislaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The little Italy of Dagobah
    Posts
    4,394
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Scheherazade
    Maybe Harry Potter books are like Marmite: You either love it or hate it!

    exactly on the dubloons! there is no real inbetween ground with ol HP (the books, not the barbecue suce, but I suppose you either love it or hate it too)

    Personally I think that they aren't so hot, and they don't teach kids some great moral lesson but ohvell.

    Personally I think children shouldn't read untill they really have a need to, when they are 12ish, and then they should only read Robinson crusoe! (joke)...(Rousseaue)...

    I just think it's sad that the classics aren't given to kids and that they aren't encouraged to read higher level literature, like Lem, Sienkewicz, Assimov,Jordan, Clavel.

    ---------------
    Stanislaw Lem
    1921 - 2006, Rest In Peace.
    "Faith is, at one and the same time, absolutely necessary and altogether impossible"

  12. #117
    String Dancer Shea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    1,931
    Quote Originally Posted by LightShade
    I was referring to Harry & his buddies & his enemies.
    So was I..
    Hwt! We Gar-Dena in geardagum,/eodcuninga rum gefrunon,/hu a elingas ellen fremedon!
    Oft Scyld Scefing sceaena reatum,/ monegum mgum, meodosetla ofteah,/ egsode eorlas, syan rest wear/ feasceaft funden; he s frofre gebad,/ weox under wolcnum, weormyndum ah,/ ot him ghwylc ara ymbsittendra/ofer hronrade hyran scolde,/gomban gyldan. t ws god cyning!

  13. #118
    Moderator Logos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    6,487
    Blog Entries
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Stanislaw

    exactly on the dubloons! there is no real inbetween ground with ol HP (the books, not the barbecue suce, but I suppose you either love it or hate it too)
    BBQ sauce? you've never had marmite have you it's truely `unique'!
    Forum Rules FAQ Tags Blogs Groups Quizzes e-Texts
    ◕‿◕ currently reading Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark, Bill Dedman (2013)

    "the dogs bark but the caravan moves on" --Arab proverb
    .


  14. #119
    Moderator Logos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    6,487
    Blog Entries
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Scheherazade
    Maybe Harry Potter books are like Marmite: You either love it or hate it !



    OMG
    Forum Rules FAQ Tags Blogs Groups Quizzes e-Texts
    ◕‿◕ currently reading Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark, Bill Dedman (2013)

    "the dogs bark but the caravan moves on" --Arab proverb
    .


  15. #120
    String Dancer Shea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    1,931
    actually, I've never heard of it. What's it taste like?
    Hwt! We Gar-Dena in geardagum,/eodcuninga rum gefrunon,/hu a elingas ellen fremedon!
    Oft Scyld Scefing sceaena reatum,/ monegum mgum, meodosetla ofteah,/ egsode eorlas, syan rest wear/ feasceaft funden; he s frofre gebad,/ weox under wolcnum, weormyndum ah,/ ot him ghwylc ara ymbsittendra/ofer hronrade hyran scolde,/gomban gyldan. t ws god cyning!

Page 8 of 37 FirstFirst ... 34567891011121318 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. BBC's Big Read
    By Scheherazade in forum General Literature
    Replies: 151
    Last Post: 01-27-2019, 06:13 AM
  2. Any Severus Snape/Alan Rickman fans ??+Harry Potter and lit
    By Venus_Severus in forum General Chat
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 09-26-2007, 05:51 PM
  3. Silas Marner- Better than the Potter books
    By MJS in forum Silas Marner
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-24-2005, 06:07 PM
  4. Potter and Milne
    By Sam Gamgee in forum Book & Author Requests
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-01-2003, 11:38 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •