View Poll Results: Do you like Harry Potter?

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  • Yes

    163 77.99%
  • No

    46 22.01%
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Thread: Harry Potter

  1. #181
    In a rainbow. Mortis Anarchy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grace86 View Post
    I personally believe we never really "grow up." It might be escapism, but who cares? Most people read all kinds of literature, classics or otherwise, to escape their world.

    Kids have more creativity and imagination than probably just about every adult. The fact that an adult can return to something so fantastic and out of this world is normal, fun, and I guess a reach for remembering to feed your inner child once in a while.

    I love the series. I don't personally understand them being overrated, since the demand is so high and the translations are so many. Fantasy, or children's fantasy, aren't genres that meet the tastes of everyone...I can understand that too.

    Cliche ideas and a bit of a rerun on fairytale topics, well guys, remember it is a story for children! It isn't supposed to be hard.

    BINGO!!! Who cares what people choose to read...it doesn't make them immature or whatever. Every person is different.

  2. #182
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    Some people have to go out of their way to hate something merely because it is popular. In most cases I would say most things that are popular are drivel, Britney Spears, Techno, Hip_Hop, Stephen King, Disney, etc. However not all popular forms of art are drivel. Harry Potter is one of them. The impact of these works has been tremendous, even the movies are well made and entertaining. I am so looking forward to the new film opening next week.

    I think Rowiling will go down in history as one of our times greatest storytellers. After all look at her income she is now one of the richest women in the world. Richer than Oprah.

    Like so many before her she created a world that is accessible to everyone no matter what the age. Today she is one of the most read authors in the world.

  3. #183
    Heart Strutter Brigitte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mortis Anarchy View Post
    Uhm well I'm a young adult and love the books. My mom is in her mid 40's and she loves the books, my brother is two years younger than me and he hates them...there was this guy that lived across the cul-de-sac in his late 50's and was OBSESSED with Harry Potter. Its not escapism if you enjoy something that was created for a younger audience.
    *hi-five* Who asked this question in the first place? *mumbles*

    EDIT: Someone with 7 posts....
    "It is when the feet weary and hope seems vain that the heartaches and the longings arise. Know, then, that for you is neither surfeit nor content. In your rocking chair, by your window dreaming, shall you long, alone. In your rocking chair, by your window, shall you dream such happiness as you may never feel."
    -- Sister Carrie

  4. #184
    In a rainbow. Mortis Anarchy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xtian View Post
    Some people have to go out of their way to hate something merely because it is popular. In most cases I would say most things that are popular are drivel, Britney Spears, Techno, Hip_Hop, Stephen King, Disney, etc. However not all popular forms of art are drivel. Harry Potter is one of them. The impact of these works has been tremendous, even the movies are well made and entertaining. I am so looking forward to the new film opening next week.

    I think Rowiling will go down in history as one of our times greatest storytellers. After all look at her income she is now one of the richest women in the world. Richer than Oprah.

    Like so many before her she created a world that is accessible to everyone no matter what the age. Today she is one of the most read authors in the world.
    Exactly. Especially since these books have inspired new decent authors and have inspired more kids to read and to branch out to their creative sides. Even adults!!! Grr...every book is liked/loved/cherished by someone out there.

  5. #185
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    Its funny how most people who have red HP are for his being banned. It amazes me how those who believe themselves intellectually gifted could feeel themselves so superior that they can make is guided judgements on something they no nothing about. Throughout history there has been many people who just because they believe something to be less than or challenaging to their own beliiefs for example: Adolf Hitler, Tipper Gore, Joseph McCarthy and many more here is an article I found on the supject

    (PR Newswire, September 25, 2000)

    HARRY POTTER PUT ON BANNED BOOK LIST
    Top 10 Includes 'Huck Finn,' 'Mice and Men' & 'Catcher in the Rye'
    CHICAGO, Sept. 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Some of America's finest literary efforts lead the 100 most frequently challenged books for Banned Books Week. And the Harry Potter series wasn't far behind.
    The list is published by the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom as part of Banned Books Week (September 23-30), which annually celebrates the freedom to read.
    Topping the list is Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz, accused of "being too scary" and "unsuited to age group," followed by "Daddy's Roommate" by Michael Willhoite, accused of "promoting homosexuality as a normal lifestyle." The rest of the 10 most frequently challenged books of the decade, in order, were: "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" by Maya Angelou (3), "The Chocolate War" by Robert Cormier, "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain, "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck, "Forever" by Judy Blume, "Bridge to Terabithia" by Katherine Paterson, "Heather Has Two Mommies" by Leslea Newman, and "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger (10).
    Other well-known books on the list include: "The Giver" by Lois Lowry (11), "It's Perfectly Normal" by Robie Harris (13), Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine (15), "The Color Purple" by Alice Walker (17), "Sex" by Madonna (18), "A Wrinkle in Time" by Madeleine L'Engle (23), "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee (40), Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling (48), "Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley (54) and "Bless Me, Ultima" by Rudolfo A. Anaya (78).
    The top 100 list was compiled from 5,718 challenges to library materials reported to or recorded by the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom from 1990-1999. A "challenge" is defined as a formal, written complaint filed with a library or school about a book's content or appropriateness. Seventy-one percent of the challenges in the '90s decade were to materials in schools or school libraries; another 26 percent were to materials in public libraries. Nearly 60 percent of challenges were brought by parents, 16 percent by library patrons and 10 percent by administrators.
    In 1995, the number of reported challenges reached a high of 762 challenges, but by 1999 had declined to 472.
    This decline is likely due to an increased focus away from books to the Internet -- the newest medium in the library -- according to Judith Krug, the office's director. Despite this decline, Krug says, "Nobody should be complacent in thinking that books are safe from censorship attempts. Research shows that reported challenges represent only 20 to 25 percent of all challenges made. The fact that every challenge is an attempt to make ideas inaccessible to their intended audience is of even greater concern than the numbers."
    The most often cited reason for requesting that a book be removed from the library or curriculum is that the book is "sexually explicit" (1,446 challenges). Other reasons for challenges included "offensive language" (1,262 challenges), "unsuited to age group" (1,167 challenges), "occult theme or promoting the occult or Satanism" (773 challenges), "violent" (630 challenges), homosexual theme or "promoting homosexuality" (497 challenges), "promoting a religious viewpoint" (397 challenges), "nudity" (297 challenges), "racism" (245 challenges), "sex education" (217 challenges) and "anti-family" (193 challenges).
    The entire list of the top 100 challenged books of the last decade can be found at www.ala.org/bbooks/top100bannedbooks.html . The most challenged books of 1999 can be found at www.ala.org/bbooks/1999bannedbooks.html .
    Observed since 1981, Banned Books Week is sponsored by the ALA, American Booksellers Association, American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, Association of American Publishers, American Society of Journalists and Authors, and National Association of College Stores. It is also endorsed by the Library of Congress Center for the Book.
    "Banned Books Week is about choice and respecting the rights of others to choose for themselves and their families what they wish to read," says Chris Finan, president of the American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression. "Book banning and challenging has a domino effect. If we stand by quietly and let the first book come off the shelf, we run the risk they all will come tumbling down."
    Judy Platt, director of the Association of American Publishers' Freedom to Read program, concurs. "Banned Books Week reminds Americans not to take our freedom to read for granted. It's one of the most precious freedoms we have in a democratic society."
    This year's Banned Books Weeks theme is "Fish in the River of Knowledge." Libraries and bookstores across the country will provide displays around this theme and readings of banned or challenged books as part of the week-long celebration. Contact your library or bookstore for more information.

  6. #186
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    Harry Potter is a COMEDEY: My Theory

    Ok, so, I was just thinking of something. I don't remember what it was, but it lead to this:

    Harry Potter's story is a COMEDY.

    Yes, that is right, the story is to end well.

    How do I know, you may ask? I'll tell you.

    Comedies used to be defined by a simple characteristic: A WEDDING at the end of the story.

    Well, what just HAPPENS to be HAPPENING in the seventh book? Anyone? Please, just say it, anyone?

    BILL AND FLEUR'S WEDDING!


    This makes the Harry Potter series a comedy. That does not necessarily mean Harry will survive in any way (Look as Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, for instance: ends with a wedding, a comedy, Romeo and Juliet die) but it does mean that the story will end "well".

    Honestly, THIS is Rowling's style. A subtle little clue as to how the story will wrap up without the details. She obviously loves literature, and what better way than to allude to how previous works were written?

    I think that this idea could be big, but more importantly, I think it's right!
    Last edited by Ace; 07-02-2007 at 02:59 AM. Reason: Spelling in title, font size

  7. #187
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    Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy. I don't think ending with a wedding automatically qualifies something as a comedy.

  8. #188
    I don't follow the series anymore for some time now, but I do know this: she will opt neither for a tragedy nor for a comedy. The book must appeal to very different tastes, to greeks and trojans, so I'd bet that the ending won't have a clear-cut one. Some will die, and some will be happy, leaving you with a bitter-sweet aftertaste and a colossal 'after-read void'

  9. #189
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kandaurov View Post
    I don't follow the series anymore for some time now, but I do know this: she will opt neither for a tragedy nor for a comedy. The book must appeal to very different tastes, to greeks and trojans, so I'd bet that the ending won't have a clear-cut one. Some will die, and some will be happy, leaving you with a bitter-sweet aftertaste and a colossal 'after-read void'
    I agree!
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
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    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

  10. #190
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    I don't understand what kind of elders can read Harry Potter. It's simply children book, a fairy story.

  11. #191
    In the fog Charles Darnay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turk View Post
    I don't understand what kind of elders can read Harry Potter. It's simply children book, a fairy story.

    Fantasy may be geered towards children but I believe it can still be enjoyable to adults too. Maybe not Harry Potter, but not becasue it's fantasy, but it's become "teen soap opera" dressed in fantasy.

    As for the original point: there is more to "a wedding" to clasify a comedy in the traditional sense. Speaking in the purly Greco-Roman sense: "A tragedy is when things start of well and then descend" whereas a comedy is reveresed. "things tstart off muddled, then ascend." Shakespeare took that concept and broadened it to create new definitions of comedy/tragedy, but nowadays, though theoretically everything can be either a comedy or tragedy (or tragicomedy: such as Waiting for Godot), the lines are very blurred.

    I don't know if Harry Potter will end well or not, but it will end cliche. There are a few different cliches she could choose from: Harry and Voldermort both die - possible. Voldermort becomes good and they all live happily ever after - highly unlikely. Harry kills Voldermort and Ron marries Hermione - possible. And so forth.....
    I wrote a poem on a leaf and it blew away...

  12. #192
    rat in a strange garret Whifflingpin's Avatar
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    "I don't understand what kind of elders can read Harry Potter. It's simply children book, a fairy story."

    My kind of elder can read Harry Potter, that's for sure.
    Open minded, intelligent, with a sense of humour and a liking for a good tale well told.

    A good children's book is a good book.
    Voices mysterious far and near,
    Sound of the wind and sound of the sea,
    Are calling and whispering in my ear,
    Whifflingpin! Why stayest thou here?

  13. #193
    In a rainbow. Mortis Anarchy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turk View Post
    I don't understand what kind of elders can read Harry Potter. It's simply children book, a fairy story.
    There is nothing wrong with adults/older people reading fairy tales/kids books...My taste in books ranges from kids books (Harry Potter, Narnia, Tithe, etc.) to the greatest classics!! I read the Iliad in the sixth grade, but what lead up to me getting into the classics were books by Brain Jacques and J.K. Rowling and C.S. Lewis!

    And yeah, I'm pretty sure I didn't laugh in Romeo and Juliet.

    But she has already stated that two people are going to die...that doesn't mean only two people but still. I think its going to be an overall mix so as not to spoil it for everyone...even though I think Lupin dies...

  14. #194
    In a rainbow. Mortis Anarchy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whifflingpin View Post
    "I don't understand what kind of elders can read Harry Potter. It's simply children book, a fairy story."

    My kind of elder can read Harry Potter, that's for sure.
    Open minded, intelligent, with a sense of humour and a liking for a good tale well told.

    A good children's book is a good book.
    Bravo.

  15. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Darnay View Post
    Fantasy may be geered towards children but I believe it can still be enjoyable to adults too. Maybe not Harry Potter, but not becasue it's fantasy, but it's become "teen soap opera" dressed in fantasy.
    I didn't talk for LOTR, i was talking for Harry Potter.

    My kind of elder can read Harry Potter, that's for sure.
    Open minded, intelligent, with a sense of humour and a liking for a good tale well told.

    A good children's book is a good book.
    So reading Harry Potter at the age of 40 makes you intelligent, open minded and have sense of humor ha? Ok.

    I can't understand why this much old people reads Harry Potter? I mean this is ridicilous.

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