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Thread: What book have you read the most times?

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    What book have you read the most times?

    What books have you guys read more than once, and were the second and up readings much different- as far as comprehension, etc., from the first?

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    so I dub thee unforgiven ntropyincarnate's Avatar
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    Ok let's see...i've probably read To Kill A Mockingbird the most times, 5 or 6. I certainly get something new out of it every time i read it, but i wouldn't say that has anything to do with comprehension. Other books that i've read a lot are Lord of the Rings, all of the Anne of Green Gables books, Quo Vadis, The Chosen...there are definitely more, but i can't think of any right now.
    Snow White is doing dishes again, 'cause what else can you do with seven itty bitty men?

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    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    O thats a tough one! Maybe Persuasion by Jane Austen.
    But then again it could be The Merlin Trilogy by Mary Stewart (The Crystal Cave, The Hollow Hills, The Last Enchantment.) I've read them every year since i was about 14....
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
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    so I dub thee unforgiven ntropyincarnate's Avatar
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    That reminds me, I've read both Pride & Prejudice and Sense & Sensibility a lot of times.
    Snow White is doing dishes again, 'cause what else can you do with seven itty bitty men?

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    Searching for..... amalia1985's Avatar
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    Wuthering Heights, My Cousin Rachel, Ivanhoe, The Age Of Innocence, and many more.
    None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe that they are free.
    -Goethe

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    malkavian manolia's Avatar
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    Lord of the rings
    Through the darkness of future past
    the magician longs to see
    one chance out between two worlds
    'Fire walk with me.'


    Twin Peaks

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    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    It would be a toss up between Dante's Comedia... at least 5 times in differing translations... and J.L. Borges' Dreamtigers (El Hacedor).
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
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    Alea iacta est. mortalterror's Avatar
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    For the novel, I've read The Catcher in the Rye about 16 times. It's stayed fresh, although I never studied it deeply like I've done with other books. I've always been slightly afraid of ruining the magic. As for poems, I've probably read The Rime of the Ancient Mariner about twenty times. Again, I haven't studied it closely. For plays, I'd have to say Hamlet. I started out reading it for fun, but then it seems like every other class I took for years we had to read it again. I've also seen various film versions multiple times; so I've lost track of how many times I've read or viewed this play. I'd have to say that I find something new every time, sometimes in the text and sometimes in the performances.

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    Jealous Optimist Dori's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mortalterror View Post
    For the novel, I've read The Catcher in the Rye about 16 times. It's stayed fresh, although I never studied it deeply like I've done with other books. I've always been slightly afraid of ruining the magic. As for poems, I've probably read The Rime of the Ancient Mariner about twenty times. Again, I haven't studied it closely. For plays, I'd have to say Hamlet. I started out reading it for fun, but then it seems like every other class I took for years we had to read it again. I've also seen various film versions multiple times; so I've lost track of how many times I've read or viewed this play. I'd have to say that I find something new every time, sometimes in the text and sometimes in the performances.
    16 times?! Oh, we just watched a movie version of Hamlet with Mel Gibson. Some parts were a bit awkward, but I liked it. Also liked the play, of course.


    I've read The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien three times.
    com-pas-sion (n.) [ME. & OFr. <LL. (Ec.) compassio, sympathy < compassus, pp. of compati, to feel pity < L. com-, together + pali, to suffer] sorrow for the sufferings or trouble of another or others, accompanied by an urge to help; deep sympathy; pity

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    Circumcised Welder El Viejo's Avatar
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    Tom Sawyer and Alice in Wonderland are on top at ten or so each.

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    Registered User Oniw17's Avatar
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    I very rarely read a book twice. I've read the Republic 3 times and have reread chapters of some books that I didn't really understand the first time. I have an extremely good memory, so reading a book twice is really boring for me.
    I think if you make a signature, you should inspire some emotion in someone else. I also think it would be pretentious for me to think I could do that.

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    I've read a few books twice, but the only ones that I have cared to read 3 times or more (sometimes more times than I can even remember! ) are:

    Jane Eyre - Bronte
    Persuasion - Austen
    The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - Lewis
    Maurice - Forster
    The "Little House" series - Wilder
    A Tale of Two Cities - Dickens
    The Phantom of the Opera - Leroux


    I still have the same opinion on those as I did when I first read them. If I didn't, I wouldn't keep getting this great desire to read them all over again.

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    I usually read books multiple times, if the book is good enough to keep me thinking. For books that I teach, I obviously read them many times each. So there are many of Shakespeare's plays that I've read more times than I can remember, for instance.

    In reading for leisure, I usually wait about 5 or more years before rereading a book. What I usually find when rereading is that there are things I forgot — not so much plot, but the subtleties. It is a good experience to read a book multiple times. Toni Morrison says that it is only when you do so that you really begin to read at all.

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    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LadyWentworth View Post
    I've read a few books twice, but the only ones that I have cared to read 3 times or more (sometimes more times than I can even remember! ) are:

    Jane Eyre - Bronte
    Persuasion - Austen
    I still have the same opinion on those as I did when I first read them. If I didn't, I wouldn't keep getting this great desire to read them all over again.
    I'm the same with these two. I've read persuasion more than Jane Eyre though, and still love both of them.
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
    Artemins Fowl and the Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer


    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

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    Registered User Etienne's Avatar
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    I believe it's probably Candide, rather short and very sweet, so that's an easy multiple reads.
    Et l'unique cordeau des trompettes marines

    Apollinaire, Le chantre

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