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Thread: American Spelling

  1. #16
    (: sprinks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ben.! View Post
    I'm Australian so I spell with all the "u"'s intact.

    I find the word just looks more full and better in Australian spelling.

    Colour as opposed to color. I prefer the spelling 'colour'. But then again, that could be just because I'm brought up under the Australian grammar system.
    As another Australian, I completely agree with you. The word just doesn't look complete, doesn't look right, without the "u".

  2. #17
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
    Well for one thing alot of American spellings are technically more phonetically correct that the Englis/Australian/ orignal correct spelling. For example ou says OW...( as in ouch, you know what I mean) so when we write colour read phonetically it say col-OW-r maybe who ever invented american spellings just thought spelling things phonetically was more logial, but then English isnt a logical languge is it?
    Nightie if you ever get around to coming to Dublin you will quickly discover that there are in fact people that pronounce Colour Col-ow-r!
    Quote Originally Posted by amanda_isabel View Post
    uh.. i suddenly just felt like posting this here. don't know if you already got this in your email.. hope the content does not offend anyone.


    The European Commission has just announced an agreement whereby English will be the official language of the European Union rather than German, which was the other possibility.

    As part of the negotiations, the British Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a 5- year phase-in plan that would become known as "Euro-English".

    In the first year, "s" will replace the soft "c". Sertainly, this will make the sivil servants jump with joy. The hard "c" will be dropped in favour of "k". This should klear up konfusion, and keyboards kan have one less letter. There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year when the troublesome "ph" will be replaced with "f".. This will make words like fotograf 20% shorter.

    In the 3rd year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible.

    Governments will enkourage the removal of double letters which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling.

    Also, al wil agre that the horibl mes of the silent "e" in the languag is disgrasful and it should go away.

    By the 4th yer people wil be reseptiv to steps such as
    replasing "th" with "z" and "w" with "v".

    During ze fifz yer, ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou" and after ziz fifz yer, ve vil hav a reil sensi bl riten styl.

    Zer vil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech oza. Ze drem of a united urop vil finali kum tru.

    Und efter ze fifz yer, ve vil al be speking German like zey vunted in ze forst plas.
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  3. #18
    Jealous Optimist Dori's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djy78usa View Post
    I once told an English friend that American spelling was just another example of "American Ingenuity." We streamlined the words, made them more efficient. He answered that American spelling was just another example of American laziness.
    Yes, because it took no effort at all to alter the English language. I'm sure Noah Webster, not to mention many other Americans, would have a few words to say about that.
    com-pas-sion (n.) [ME. & OFr. <LL. (Ec.) compassio, sympathy < compassus, pp. of compati, to feel pity < L. com-, together + pali, to suffer] sorrow for the sufferings or trouble of another or others, accompanied by an urge to help; deep sympathy; pity

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  4. #19
    Piglet RJbibliophil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DapperDrake View Post
    Like many of the differences between England and America the main reason is a willful corruption just to prove independence.
    I.e. "I'm not a colony any more and I'll prove it by doing everything backwards!"
    Dapper is actually almost correct, from what I have learned in U.S. History. After the War of Independence from Great Britain, there were some issues with the language. American primers were made so that the school children would not be learning the King's English, which was already quite different from American English. Some of this is due to the way language changes and some due to influences of other languages.

    It is also interesting to note that not only spelling, but also word usage and pronunciation are different in British.
    When ideas fail, words come in very handy.


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  5. #20
    Jealous Optimist Dori's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJbibliophil View Post
    Dapper is actually almost correct, from what I have learned in U.S. History. After the War of Independence from Great Britain, there were some issues with the language. American primers were made so that the school children would not be learning the King's English, which was already quite different from American English. Some of this is due to the way language changes and some due to influences of other languages.

    It is also interesting to note that not only spelling, but also word usage and pronunciation are different in British.
    Here's an essay that I have yet to read on the subject (or something similar):

    From Ambivalence to Acceptance: American Attitudes Towards Linguistic and National Identity
    com-pas-sion (n.) [ME. & OFr. <LL. (Ec.) compassio, sympathy < compassus, pp. of compati, to feel pity < L. com-, together + pali, to suffer] sorrow for the sufferings or trouble of another or others, accompanied by an urge to help; deep sympathy; pity

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  6. #21
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
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    american spelling makes less sense. 'paedophilia'- the 'paedo' means children. it's
    greek-derived or something. how are you supposed to work out what a word means? is 'pedo' considered a prefix meaning child?

  7. #22
    Voice of Chaos & Anarchy
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelby_lake View Post
    Why do Americans spell things differently?
    One reason was the work of the infamous Noah Webster, who codified some spellings that he preferred. Most of those spellings have continued since then. Another reason is that errors have become so common that the errors are taken as correct in America now. For example, the participles of the verb 'travel in America are commonly spelled with a single 'l'. The rules of orthography say that that speling would have a long e, rather than retaining the short e in travel. The rule is that when adding a suffix to a word ending in a consonant preceded by a short vowel, one doubles the final consonant and adds the siffix; thus: travelling, controlling, stopping, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by kelby_lake View Post
    american spelling makes less sense. 'paedophilia'- the 'paedo' means children. it's
    greek-derived or something. how are you supposed to work out what a word means? is 'pedo' considered a prefix meaning child?
    The second half is even worse. 'Philia' indicates affection between friends. The earlier word 'paederasty' was more appropriate, because '_erasty' is a combinatory form for eroticism. Paederasty has nothing to do with affection among friends.

  8. #23
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
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    lost in translation...?

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelby_lake View Post
    lost in translation...?
    No, recontextualized for the benefit of the criminals.

  10. #25
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    Actually, following the rules of doubling or not, American spelling is more logical. If a polysyllabic word has the stress on the final syllable it doubles and if it doesn't it doesn't:
    referred, preferred, admitted, overlapped
    remembered, developed, benefited, edited

    excel, control fit into the first group, while travel, label etc. fit into the second group better than the first but for some reason the non-US spelling doubles the L for both.
    Last edited by nmmad; 04-23-2008 at 05:42 PM.

  11. #26
    unidentified hit record blp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterL View Post
    The second half is even worse. 'Philia' indicates affection between friends. The earlier word 'paederasty' was more appropriate, because '_erasty' is a combinatory form for eroticism. Paederasty has nothing to do with affection among friends.
    This is really off-topic, but, here in England a few years ago, during one of the periodic paedophile panics, the satirical magazine Private Eye ran a cartoon showing a man running from an angry mob, protesting, 'But I'm a paediatrician'. Some months later, this episode came grotesquely true when a paediatrician's office was trashed by an angry and incredibly stupid mob.

  12. #27
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nmmad View Post
    Actually, following the rules of doubling or not, American spelling is more logical. If a polysyllabic word has the stress on the final syllable it doubles and if it doesn't it doesn't:
    referred, preferred, admitted, overlapped
    remembered, developed, benefited, edited

    excel, control fit into the first group, while travel, label etc. fit into the second group better than the first but for some reason the non-US spelling doubles the L for both.
    english doubling generally just looks better

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