Page 1 of 15 12345611 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 217

Thread: Saddest/Most Depressing Novel You've Ever Read

  1. #1
    Call me Shane mcilroga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    13

    Saddest/Most Depressing Novel You've Ever Read

    So, I've covered just about every other genre in the literature world lately, so I'd really appreciate any recommendations regarding sad/depressing novels that you've read... and I mean sad. I want a BIG tear-jerker... as much so as possible.

    Any help would be... err, helpful.


  2. #2
    Two Gun Kid Idril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    9,468
    The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky is the most depressing book I've ever read, followed closely by Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy.
    the luminous grass of the prairie hides
    feet lovely and still as sleeping doves,
    porcelain bones strong enough to carry a life,
    but weighty and unmovable
    As black Dakota hills.
    ~ Riesa

  3. #3
    Moderator Logos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    6,487
    Blog Entries
    19
    I just finished Jesus Land by Julia Scheeres (now a movie too) and it has got to be the most depressing/heartbreaking novel I have read, to-date It's a true story and covers the gamut of depressing topics: racism, child abuse, parents-who-don't-deserve-to-be-parents, religious zealotry, and on and on. All I can say is I'm really happy Julia has become a successful writer and overcome the horrors of her childhood.
    Forum Rules FAQ Tags Blogs Groups Quizzes e-Texts
    ◕‿◕ currently reading Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark, Bill Dedman (2013)

    "the dogs bark but the caravan moves on" --Arab proverb
    .


  4. #4
    Inexplicably Undiscovered
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    next door to the lady in the vinegar bottle
    Posts
    5,015
    Blog Entries
    72
    "Sophie's Choice" by William Styron. It was so emotionally devastating that I still can't bring myself to watch the movie version, to this day.
    Also, a short story with the similar theme: "The Shawl" by
    Cynthia Ozick.
    There is much to be said for catharsis, however; sometimes some good can be gained from painful emotional experiences

  5. #5
    Registered User Etienne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    967
    "The Idiot" Dostoevsky
    "The Sorrows of the Young Werther" Goethe
    "Iceland Fisherman" Pierre Loti

    Lots of people will also tell you Anna Karenina by Tolstoy, but I didn't think it was that depressing, I think War and Peace could also be included here, but it contains so many other emotions at the same time.
    Last edited by Etienne; 10-23-2007 at 12:32 PM.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,915
    Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes

    I literally cried at the end of that. Depressed me so much. There are others, but this was the worst for me. It is also quite thought-provoking. Very heartbreaking. If you want a tear-jerker, read this one!

  7. #7
    Bibliophile JBI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,358
    My Antonia, not exactly a sad book, though I was heavily depressed. Also some Zola work is always depressing, and Hardy as well.

  8. #8
    veni vidi vixi Bakiryu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Rolling and tumbling
    Posts
    5,398
    Blog Entries
    1
    Ender's Game actually gives a sort of nervous breakdown, I just lay on the floor crying.

    Fullmoon wo Sagashaite is so sad and immortal Rain, then again Naruto makes me sad, Flowers for Algernon, the dreaded romance novels, most things by Anne Rice. And the Notebook (the book) is very sad also.

    It's easy to make me sad I guess.
    Shall these bones live?

  9. #9
    shortstuff higley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    560
    Blog Entries
    18
    Flowers for Algernon was quite sad, as was My Brother Sam is Dead. But nothing got me like Where the Red Fern Grows.
    '...A cast of your skull, sir, until the original is available, would be an ornament to any anthropological museum. It is not my intention to be fulsome, but I confess that I covet your skull.' --Dr. Mortimer, The Hound of the Baskervilles

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    20
    ooh, this is embarassing but the fashion pack by Marion Hume... there was a very tragic event within the book, and i think this event coupled with exasperation of the situation and the sheer fact that i had just read 500 pages in one sitting made me bawl my eyes out... i would never admit this to a friend and im sorry if anyone else has read the book... haha... actually no i would rather people let me know if they had i want to know if they had a similar experience or not - it would make me feel so much better!

    it was the part where the american editor died in the crash... devestating!!

    this wasnt the saddest book, but this was one of the books that i have had more of an emotional reaction to... annother was Margaret Atwood - the silent assasin...
    Last edited by grittylit; 10-23-2007 at 11:06 PM.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    45
    The Silent Angel by Heinrich Boll is a good one.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2
    Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo.

    An anti-war novel about a man who's lost his arms, legs, sight, hearing, and is being kept alive by machines. Stream of consciousness writing.

  13. #13
    Ataraxia bazarov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    In spleen
    Posts
    2,219
    Diary of Anna Frank - I didn't cried; I am a male! But I felt very sad.
    At thunder and tempest, At the world's coldheartedness,
    During times of heavy loss And when you're sad
    The greatest art on earth Is to seem uncomplicatedly gay.

    To get things clear, they have to firstly be very unclear. But if you get them too quickly, you probably got them wrong.
    If you need me urgent, send me a PM

  14. #14
    I have felt depressed reading the following (maybe it was just me at the time):

    Charlotte Bronte Vilette

    Erskine Childers The Riddle of the Sands

    E W Hornung Raffles

    A couple of people have mentioned The Idiot. It was the first great Russian classic I ever read, and I re-read it again this year. Awe inspiring, yes, but not depressing for me.

  15. #15
    Inexplicably Undiscovered
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    next door to the lady in the vinegar bottle
    Posts
    5,015
    Blog Entries
    72
    There is a devastating ending to The Transit of Venus by
    Shirley Hazzard. The unpleasant surprise may pack an emotional wallop; yet again, there is something to be said about the Greek idea of "catharsis" in tragedy. For instance, King Lear evokes tragic emotions in the audience, but somehow reading the play -- or especially watching a live performance done well -- is a life-affirming experience.

Page 1 of 15 12345611 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. My teacher made me read this book!!!
    By Sarah in forum Gulliver's Travels
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-09-2008, 07:37 PM
  2. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-15-2006, 12:57 PM
  3. Read for Degree :(
    By Aasiya in forum Great Expectations
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-24-2005, 06:07 PM
  4. PLEASE read and give me your comments
    By Slimeyborg in forum General Chat
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 11-01-2004, 01:28 PM
  5. Please Read And Give Me Your Comments
    By Slimeyborg in forum General Literature
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-20-2004, 09:19 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •