Page 20 of 21 FirstFirst ... 1015161718192021 LastLast
Results 286 to 300 of 302

Thread: Can a Christian be a Buddhist? Vice-versa?

  1. #286
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Belo Horizonte- Brasil
    Posts
    2,738
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCool View Post
    What do you know of that Jesus taught? If you really had a grasp of Him, you wouldn't be putting me down.

    The problem with your kind is you try to intellectualize God and it don't work. He comes across foolish to you.

    You're the one that really started attacking my faith, not the other way around. Besides, I could care less.
    So far, you are just aiming to personal attack someone who just corrected you from the basic mistake of using a dialogue with Moses as an evidence that God broke the covenant with Israel. So, you suggested that people who disagree with you have "No brain", that "My kind" (which one is exactly? Black? Jew? Klingon?) cannot do something. And yes, good christians are not agressive, but respectful to others. They respect differences, not equality. You are just breaking the convenant by desobeying his teachings. (I fail to see they are such secret and so hard for people to know).

    I laid out the verses where even a child could understand, but you still rant about Israel in some incoherent manner.
    But you dont. You mention Moses. Even a kid now God could not breaking the convenant with Israel with Moses. The entire Israel nation and the laws the uphold the convenant come after him. God still helping Israel and their people.

    And the verse of Jeremiah certainly disproof that God was breaking the convenant with Israel. A kid can read he is stabilishing a convenant with Israel and Judah, not breaking it in the very "verses" you posted. (God states Israel will last forever in Jeremiah as well).

    Even a kid you say... Are you going to say the bible was written in some cryptic language?

    You want to attack me, I can take it.[/QUOTE]

    No, I do like a good christian and I do not attack anyone. i rather use the pencil than the sword.

  2. #287
    ShadowsCool ShadowsCool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    In the clouds
    Posts
    769
    Quote Originally Posted by JCamilo View Post

    But you dont. You mention Moses. Even a kid now God could not breaking the convenant with Israel with Moses. The entire Israel nation and the laws the uphold the convenant come after him. God still helping Israel and their people.
    Quote Originally Posted by JCamilo View Post
    And the verse of Jeremiah certainly disproof that God was breaking the convenant with Israel. A kid can read he is stabilishing a convenant with Israel and Judah, not breaking it in the very "verses" you posted. (God states Israel will last forever in Jeremiah as well).
    What do you know about the Bible? Obviously little. Yeah, God states that Israel will last forever, that's right, His people. Meaning the New Covenant has been switched over since the Jews rejected Christ. Now, all who are chosen are the spiritual Israel. You don't understand that?


    Come on man, are you actually saying that the Jews didn't have a problem with God. Are you really saying that? Cause a New Covenant was formed, and an old Covenant was abolished. That was my whole point. Of course, God still sent prophets. But that was not the question. The question was, was the old Covenant broken; and it certainly was. You can't see that? And I stand by that text. It proves my point, no matter what you say.

    As far as aggressive goes. What, should I let you walk all over me because I'm a Christian? Where would that get me? You've been looking to attack me from post one!

    So you're allowed to attack me, but I can't fight back? yeah right!

    You have a stereotype of what a good Christian is. I'll fight for my right to believe. So people like you don't step all over me.
    Last edited by ShadowsCool; 04-14-2012 at 05:02 PM.
    shad·ow ing

  3. #288
    quite like george NikolaiI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    the Lake of Dreams
    Posts
    6,416
    Blog Entries
    407
    When you look at Buddhism and you look at Christianity, 99% of them are the same: that is,

    transformation of one's life into something better daily,in each moment, by practicing kindness and love

    that constitutes 99%. Positive things, hope, peace, love, knowledge, wisdom, bliss - again, 99% of it. To harm others is the highest "no-no" in both religions. To do so goes against them both. And you can harm others with words as easily and sometimes more deeply than other ways.

    This is why respected Zen master and Buddhist teacher and leader Thich Nhat Hanh said what he did ("when you are a truly happy Buddhist, you are a Christian also, and vice versa") and why respect Christian monk and meditator, and teacher and leader Thomas Merton said, "I will be the best Buddhist I can be."

    I hope that some good may come out of this, even the clearly (extremely) negative needles that have been flung. It's my firm belief that even good and bad are intertwined - the lotus grows from the mud, etc.

    It's my sincere wish that all beings be happy. To that end, I'm sending peaceful and positive thoughts, love and kindness if you will, to everyone here. May your lives be continually transformed by the wisdom and love of Christ, if that is the form of the divine you hold sacred, or by the wisdom and love of Buddha, if that is the form of the divine you hold dear.

    In my mother's church, we always say, "Peace be with you," to which we reply, "and also with you." In Thay's dharma talks, I hear them sing,

    "The mind can go in a thousand directions,
    but on this lovely day I walk in peace.
    With each step, a gentle wind blows,
    with each step, a flower blooms."

    Both of these are meant for one thing - peace. Thay said, our intention is not to give you ideas about peace - you have plenty of ideas about peace. "Our intention is to be Peace... and this is possible, because Peace should be there in your body." The goal of both religions, once again, is a transformation to this peace.

    I hope I have helped others in some way think about things in some new way. I am assuming that it's more likely than not that this thread will be closed now, which I accept without concern..
    Last edited by NikolaiI; 04-14-2012 at 05:49 PM.

  4. #289
    ShadowsCool ShadowsCool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    In the clouds
    Posts
    769
    Quote Originally Posted by NikolaiI View Post
    When you look at Buddhism and you look at Christianity, 99% of them are the same: that is,

    transformation of one's life into something better daily,in each moment, by practicing kindness and love

    that constitutes 99%. Positive things, hope, peace, love, knowledge, wisdom, bliss - again, 99% of it. To harm others is the highest "no-no" in both religions. To do so goes against them both. And you can harm others with words as easily and sometimes more deeply than other ways.

    This is why respected Zen master and Buddhist teacher and leader Thich Nhat Hanh said what he did ("when you are a truly happy Buddhist, you are a Christian also, and vice versa") and why respect Christian monk and meditator, and teacher and leader Thomas Merton said, "I will be the best Buddhist I can be."
    I respect your position. Because you come at it with a positive vibe. I don't believe in it, but I don't have to. I guess that's why we all have different spirits. Good luck.
    shad·ow ing

  5. #290
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Belo Horizonte- Brasil
    Posts
    2,738
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCool View Post
    What do you know about the Bible? Obviously little. Yeah, God states that Israel will last forever, that's right, His people. Meaning the New Covenant has been switched over since the Jews rejected Christ. Now, all who are chosen are the spiritual Israel. You don't understand that?
    No sense. He refers to Israel and House of Judah, the political division of the state. If God intented to mean Israel as synounimous of "all people", he would not mention thedivsion.


    Come on man, are you actually saying that the Jews didn't have a problem with God. Are you really saying that? Cause a New Covenant was formed, and an old Covenant was abolished. That was my whole point. Of course, God still sent prophets. But that was not the question. The question was, was the old Covenant broken; and it certainly was. You can't see that? And I stand by that text. It proves my point, no matter what you say.
    Your claim is not the convenant was broken, but broken with Israel. You quoted Jeremiah who mentions clearly the renew of the convenant (since he kind off reinforces the older deuteronimic laws, he is hardly abolishing the old convenant, rather reinforcing it) was still with Israel and House of Judah.

    And he keep sending prophets only to Israel or House of Judah (with Ezekiel he even reinforces it by rebuilding the temple and punishing some other who destroyed it. The convenant was clearly not switched in the old testment if God still wants to rebuild the temple and punish House of Judah and Israel enemies).

    No matter what you say as you do a leap of interpretation and ignore the Jews and Israel stil follow the convenant.

    As far as aggressive goes. What, should I let you walk all over me because I'm a Christian? Where would that get me? You've been looking to attack me from post one!
    No, the only person who went on personal attack is you.My first post just said :You are really arguing jews broken the convenant even before they have build even Jerusalem?. Where is the attack? If you felt attacked by it, then you should avoid society.

    So you're allowed to attack me, but I can't fight back? yeah right!

    You have a stereotype of what a good Christian is. I'll fight for my right to believe. So people like you don't step all over me.
    You are the only person attacking here. I did not said a thing about your person. I do not care about your person. I said about your arguments and yes, a christian is someone who must show respect to all people, not matter the difference. That is not something you do.

  6. #291
    ShadowsCool ShadowsCool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    In the clouds
    Posts
    769
    Truce. This endless back and forth ain't getting us anywhere. You have your belief's and I have mine. End of discussion.
    shad·ow ing

  7. #292
    quite like george NikolaiI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    the Lake of Dreams
    Posts
    6,416
    Blog Entries
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy88 View Post
    No, a Christian cannot be a buddhist. A Christian can be buddhistic, as I believe Christianity in essence is, but if a Christian can be a Buddhist and fill out both in the religion column of some form then that diminishes the meaning of both references to one's identity. Most Buddhism does in fact involve faith. The essence of Buddhism does not, but its actual practice often, in most sects, is accompanied by an intellectual leap beyond what is scientifically and logically certain.

    Both religions can be great. I would be proud to belong to either.
    Well, I don't understand why you say the essence of Buddhism does not involve faith. In my understanding Shraddha (faith) is very fundamental, it's one of the first and most basic, as well as necessary, steps.

    Here is a very nice article.. http://buddhism.about.com/od/basicbu...faithdoubt.htm Okay it gives me something I'd read more about previously..

    " ... a Zen proverb says that a Zen student must have great faith, great doubt, and great determination. A related Ch'an saying says the four prerequisites for practice are great faith, great doubt, great vow, and great vigor. ..."

    I'd read (In that book you mentioned once, The Three Pillars of Zen an essay or talk about that zen proverb, how the student must have great faith, great doubt and great determination.. Obviously there are endless facets to the jewel that is Buddhism..

    The only place where I disagree from her slightly is when she says at the beginning how the word faith has been like degraded.. I don't think it has all that much.. but then I live where I live..
    Last edited by NikolaiI; 04-14-2012 at 06:12 PM.

  8. #293
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Coventry, West Midlands
    Posts
    6,049
    Blog Entries
    35
    I was at a teaching today about taking refuge given by Tibetan Buddhist Teacher Geshe Tashi Tsering of the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition - FPMT.

    In his preamble to taking refuge he asked us to consider two questions:

    Why Spirituality? (I posted a new thread on this).
    and
    Why The Buddhadharma and not the religion of our Forefathers?

    His advice was to consider the other major religions and really consider which religious tradition will give you what you want.

    He said the next step was to consider which Buddhist tradition to consider, and also which parts of the Buddhist traditions to incorporate in your skillful practice.

    What is clear is that in considering The Buddhadharma you are making a very serious choice - in fact his advice was that having taken refuge in The Buddha Dharma and Sangha is to seriously apply yourself to the path.

    He also said that flitting from one religion to another will bring little benefit. The reason for this is that whichever spiritual path a person chooses, it is a serious decision, and not one taken lightly. Buddhism requires a practice - ideally daily - which will enable a practitioner to apply the teachings to their specific path. No doubt the same is required in different ways of other religions.

    The differences between Christianity and Buddhism have been explained on this thread a lot, and they probably need no reiteration. Darcy is absoutely correct.

    I think what you have to consider about Thich Nat Hahn's book is what is its purpose? He's a great teacher, but did he get where he is by this kind of dual practice? No. He's a Buddhist who accepts Buddha's teachings.

    What does he mean by "When you are truly happy"?.

    I don't think he's saying Buddhism and Christianity are the same - he's talking about the completion of the path where distinctions become irrelevant. He doesn't say practice or believe the same things. I haven't read the book, but I read a couple of Christian reviews where the criticism of him was that he seemed to be trying to Buddhify Christianity. As I said, he's a great teacher, and I don't believe that criticism. I think he's probably offering a way for christians to benefit from some of the Buddhist methods no doubt in all sincerity.

    So to reiterate: there is little value in flitting from one religion to another and trying to amagamate them. Both are valuable, as every religion is, to their practitioners, but the danger is that by the time you find this out, that time will have gone.

    Don't waste your time. Consider very carefully which religion will benefit you the most, and choose the path that best suits you.

  9. #294
    quite like george NikolaiI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    the Lake of Dreams
    Posts
    6,416
    Blog Entries
    407
    Paul I have tried discussing with you before, in fact I wrote out several paragraphs but deleted them, but I have found it nigh impossible, I'm afraid. When I've discussed with you I've met an impenetrable, rigid wall which permits no flexibility... I won't surmise as to why the irreconcilibilty between us, but I wished to give you some response so you'd know what I am thinking and feeling. I think it is good that you are practicing Buddhism, though, and I wish to encourage you in every way. I do trust, however differently we view thoughts and philosophy, you will appreciate my honesty in this. So in essence, I am saying we will have to agree to disagree.

    Having said this, I'm aware that all is always in change. I have meditated deeply on many Buddhist teachings for hundreds of hours, and yet I do fall short of perfection. For instance, one of Bankei's teachings is very instrumental in my life, and yet I have not reached its full realization.. I am speaking of his statement on self-partiality. For instance, in this discussion, I am sure I am constrained by it.

    In the past, part of the rigidity I mean, you have dismissed much of what I have said.. Paul, I am one of the greatest... understanders.. of my generation. I have understood things which no one has. Long since I have realized that speaking of these publicly is not the best direction, yet I mention it now.. just to give you an idea where I'm coming from. You may not understand or agree, and that's fine, but I do say it for a reason. Praising oneself is certainly not generally a good way to improve one's position, but here I am not interested or attached to position in any degree. I do not mean to speak highly of myself, for I view myself as insubstantial as a leaf, yet also I am aware, near fully so, that even a leaf has a Buddha nature. Now, you are in the state where you argue particulars and you would go off into an argument of why a leaf does not have a Buddha nature, but I have had the experience, quite fully, that it does, that everything does.

    Does this matter, no. But I wanted to tell you that I am, like I said, one of the best understanders, and I know of no other way of telling you this that might be better. You asked what it means to be truly happy. To be truly happy is to be in a complete state of gratitude, as well as bliss. For instance, I know that I've been blessed. I am lucky. you might call it, infinite luck. It is about how you view things. Ideally, everything is perfect. That's the nature of idealism, right? But it is not perfect. But it is. And we go back, and forth, and back and forth a million times, that is samsara. Only by cutting the root...

    And I have done this, and seen all this, and been all this, and I told you that from the start, and from the start you objected and rejected and separated and all I told you was, I have.

    What is one of the goals? It is developing spiritual power; what do we do with that? Generate positive potential, the energy of mindfulness - the energy of mindfulness is a powerful thing. Our world has a lot to do with shifting powers. And in our world, people suffer a lot because they care a lot about these things. The driving force of inequity and suffering is this complex complex we have; it is, all simultaneously: "I want. I want to have power. I don't have power. I want to know." People want to be rich. They want to have sex. Others just want to be happy, or they want to be healthy, or to have peace. The latter is a little higher than the former. But all wants are propagating one basic illusion, the illusion of duality and separateness. The shifting of wants is all part of this illusion..

    Others want power so they can do good, and this is a very high ideal. Others want power so they can be respected more greatly, or feared more greatly, which isn't as high an ideal. The masters, the Buddha and other masters, figured this all out and knew there's only one way to be free of it - to step off the merry-go-round, to step off the wheel of cyclic existence. Funny thing is, you step off and realize you are at the hub, you were never moving, just your thoughts. This is why the, and it's so amazing to me, you have the same realizations popping up everywhere, in China, and in North America, and so many other places.. Black Elk, Lao Tzu, the list is endless.

    You may ask, why have I rambled about so many subjects that are somewhat related but barely touching to the issue? No reason and every reason. My reason is for us to have a dialogue we need to cross many miles, because we've never been able to see remotely eye to eye. And because of the inherent nature of self-partiality, neither of us has accepted responsibility. But Paul I respect you as a Buddha. I hope you know that and anything that seems otherwise is really not, because this is what I truly feel.

    So I hope you know that. Even if I don't like you, I respect you as a Buddha. And it is good that we disagree.

    Bankei taught that everyone has a Buddha-mind. He said, when you were born your mother gave you one thing, and that is your unborn Buddha mind. If a person is simply at peace, if they are one with nature, then they are a Buddha. To be a Buddha is just this. It's an infinite process, but it's quite doable. You may say now, "What does Nikolai know about being a Buddha? I think everything he says is false and misguided and potentially harmful," and you have said this in the past, and worked to great ends therefore. That is why I wrote the first paragraph. The fact that everything is always in change, infinitely, is why I wrote the rest.

    Reality is infinite. The universe is infinitesimal. I've been around. I don't want to do anything, I have nothing to do. I am only here until everyone wakes up and realizes everything. Until then, I'll come back here now and then, and live out my natural life...

    It is natural to doubt. 99% of everyone everywhere has been about 99% wrong. But it is also natural to have faith, as I said, you've gotta have doubt and faith. So even though I doubt you, I also have great faith in you, Paulclem, as I said. And I want you to know that. It is the 1% that they have been right that matters, you know, and that redeems everything, that makes them beautiful, human, and that 1% has an infinitely greater weight than the rest. That is why I never start up conversations like this with people - no, I relate to them on their terms, within their reality. And you know? That is a perfect rule that will allow you to get on with everyone, and everyone will love you .. so if that is what you want, if you want everyone to love you; all you gotta do, is don't care, don't care at all, be completely not attached; yet also care, live with others, be compassionate with others, because as you are aware, you're not separate. So, what - don't care, and care? It doesn't make sense, that is, it's a paradox to our Western way of thinking.

    You're unattached so you can be equal towards everyone, so you don't show more or less respect to the master in the temple as to the urchin in the street; but you care because you are connected to everyone in Buddha-nature. And you know what? I am not saying you should not reject what I teach. You should if it doesn't sound right to your heart. My inner truth is not your inner truth. And unlike others, I'm not trying to shed light on anyone's darkness. I'm just trying to shine my light to anyone and everyone. I don't think you have darkness; as I have said (and think you've disagreed), everything is light. We think there are shadows, but.. and in relation to what I said about how the 1% of good in people outweighs everything..

    again to quote Thomas Merton, "There is no way of telling people they are all walking around shining like the sun. … it was as if I suddenly saw the secret beauty of their hearts, the depths of their hearts where neither sin nor desire nor self-knowledge can reach, the core of their reality, the person that each one is in God’s eyes. If only they could all see themselves as they really are."

    I'll continue the discussion of religion if you want to. And I will even try to do so in a less flitting way. But you know I do flit about. I flit away from discussions if they are not beneficial, if there is not a foundation of trust and respect and love between the parties. Not love, but the beginning emotion of it, which is friendliness. Sometimes we have to go back to the basics. And this, is quite basic.

  10. #295
    Maybe YesNo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Near Chicago, Illinois USA
    Posts
    3,192
    Blog Entries
    1
    I started reading Thich Nhat Hanh's Going Home Jesus and Buddha as Brothers as a result of this thread. The introduction said that Nhat Hanh when he meets someone he bows and says to himself: "I bow to you an enlightened being to be." That sounds like a nice way for one person to view another.

    There's a documentary, Cave of Forgotten Dreams, about the Chauvet caves in France: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1664894/ Toward the end someone says that our species, Homo sapiens, was misnamed. It should have been Homo spiritualis.

    Whatever common ground there is between Buddhism and Christianity I suspect it goes back further in time.

  11. #296
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Coventry, West Midlands
    Posts
    6,049
    Blog Entries
    35
    Hi Nik. We've presented our respective views. What more to add? I'm glad it's working out for you.

    I saw Thic Nhat Hanh quite a few years ago for a short teaching he did in Birmingham. I'll always remember him holding out an orange as a symbol of interconnectedness. It's a really nice image I have of him.

    The doc sounds fascinating. I'll see if I can get it on my Lovefilm account.

  12. #297
    quite like george NikolaiI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    the Lake of Dreams
    Posts
    6,416
    Blog Entries
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by YesNo View Post
    I started reading Thich Nhat Hanh's Going Home Jesus and Buddha as Brothers as a result of this thread. The introduction said that Nhat Hanh when he meets someone he bows and says to himself: "I bow to you an enlightened being to be." That sounds like a nice way for one person to view another.

    There's a documentary, Cave of Forgotten Dreams, about the Chauvet caves in France: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1664894/ Toward the end someone says that our species, Homo sapiens, was misnamed. It should have been Homo spiritualis.

    Whatever common ground there is between Buddhism and Christianity I suspect it goes back further in time.
    That's very cool. Let me know how it is.

    I've never read any books by Thay, except for a few pages here and there, but now that I've seen Tommy Angelo's list I'm going to have to. I've listened to a lot of his dharma talks though, those can be downloaded online, and they've been very enlightening and strengthening to my practice.

  13. #298
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    The Far East (of England)
    Posts
    68
    There are areas of Buddhist doctrine that are incompatible with Christianity.

    In Buddhism we have a concept called "The three marks of existence"

    Impermanence, suffering, and non-self.

    Christianity teaches that God and Heaven are permanent, and that a human has an immutable soul.
    Also, Buddhism teaches that we give ourselves salvation, whereas Christianity tends to be more petitionary, and calls on God for salvation.
    So it would be considered (to some extent) an incomplete teaching by a Buddhist.

    I think Christianity has a lot of good things to teach, and I think its healthy to experiment with traditions and resist labels.

    But I suspect most people who try to "practice both" will end up veering more towards one or the other as their practice deepens.

    I still find much that I love about the teachings of Jesus, but there are certain things in the gospel I simply cannot bring myself to accept.

    Thomas Merton wrote a lot about the subject, but ultimately tended to ignore questions of doctrine, deeming Buddhist and Christian doctrine largely apart, and focussed instead on the things the faiths have in common, and the mystical experience that underlies both our practices.

  14. #299
    ShadowsCool ShadowsCool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    In the clouds
    Posts
    769
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonsai Ent View Post
    I still find much that I love about the teachings of Jesus, but there are certain things in the gospel I simply cannot bring myself to accept.
    You make some valid points. I was wondering what things you cannot accept.

    The way I understand it, if every man turned good suddenly the world would become a nice place. Every one would then go to heaven and life on earth would become so much happier. I know I am simplifying it but I believe it to be true. But the Bible teaches, and I don't need the Bible to teach me this, that man is not good, and that he's greedy and self absorbed. Each man goes his own way for his own desire. Builds his own castle for his self and tends to shun any and all other men. I know this is a fact, cause I know some people who have the doe but they don't want to share a dime. And the one's that do share, what are they sharing?

    Ever hear the story of the poor lady giving a few pennies? She gave more than the rich man. So it says.

    So man is a lost soul and even the best of them come up short. This is why the Bible says: Foolish men, ever learning, never finding.

    Ah, they found themselves and now it's time to die. No philosophy is going to save his greedy soul.
    Last edited by ShadowsCool; 05-14-2012 at 04:08 PM.
    shad·ow ing

  15. #300
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Coventry, West Midlands
    Posts
    6,049
    Blog Entries
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCool View Post
    You make some valid points. I was wondering what things you cannot accept.

    The way I understand it, if every man turned good suddenly the world would become a nice place. Every one would then go to heaven and life on earth would become so much happier. I know I am simplifying it but I believe it to be true. But the Bible teaches, and I don't need the Bible to teach me this, that man is not good, and that he's greedy and self absorbed. Each man goes his own way for his own desire. Builds his own castle for his self and tends to shun any and all other men. I know this is a fact, cause I know some people who have the doe but they don't want to share a dime. And the one's that do share, what are they sharing?

    Ever hear the story of the poor lady giving a few pennies? She gave more than the rich man. So it says.

    So man is a lost soul and even the best of them come up short. This is why the Bible says: Foolish men, ever learning, never finding.

    Ah, they found themselves and now it's time to die. No philosophy is going to save his greedy soul.
    Every one would then go to heaven and life on earth would become so much happier.

    This is one of the reasons why Buddhism and Christianity differ. Heaven in Buddhist cosmology is transient lie all the other realms. Good Karma is exhausted without the wisdom to practice, and the being then falls from heaven into a lower rebirth.

    I agree about the simple truths though. Just be good.

    In the end though it's difficult to achieve this socially. The Buddhist explanation for this is ignorence of what causes suffering. Buddhism postulates that each living being tries to be and maintain a state of happiness. What The Buddha said was that they were actually ignorent of how to do this, and instead acted unskillfully and caused themselves further sufferig.

Similar Threads

  1. Christian anarchism
    By Eagleheart in forum The Kingdom of God is Within You
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-02-2009, 05:38 PM
  2. Apocrypha and christian legends
    By Alysse in forum Religious Texts
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-05-2009, 02:53 PM
  3. Sex and the Koran
    By atiguhya padma in forum Religious Texts
    Replies: 116
    Last Post: 04-05-2006, 09:07 PM
  4. Whether he was Christian
    By Sean G. Fogarty in forum God The Invisible King
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-22-2006, 09:53 AM
  5. Christian allegory
    By J Wallace in forum Crime and Punishment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-24-2005, 06:07 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •