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Thread: I Need Your Help In Latin Scannsion- Virgil's Aneiad

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    I Need Your Help In Latin Scannsion- Virgil's Aneiad

    can anyone please help me scan 6 lines of the aneiad? please!

  2. #2
    Registered User quasimodo1's Avatar
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    To A.J. PT: Please supply the latin expression (s)? quasimodo1

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    thank you!

    thank you so much! here it is:

    Tum Iuno omnipotens, longum miserata dolorem
    difficilisque obitus, Irim demisit Olympo,
    quae luctantem animam nexosque resolveret artus.
    Nam quia nec fato, merita nec morte peribat,
    sed misera ante diem, subitoque accensa furore,
    nondum illi flavum Proserpina vertice crinem
    abstulerat, Stygioque caput damnaverat Orco.

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    Registered User quasimodo1's Avatar
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    Dear A.J. PT: I need the chapter and verse as I had to translate this work back in Catholic University some years ago, otherwise only a rough idea would be possible. quasimodo1

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    thanks so much! Passage from the Aeneid IV.693-705

    a rough scansion would be much appreciated too! thanks.

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    anyone?....

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    Registered User quasimodo1's Avatar
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    Virgil, Aeneid, IV, 639-705

    To A.J. P T: this seems like the best bet, given the liberties of some translators, be advised there may be a sentence or two at the end that adds to the clarity: All lines seperated by"/". Then Juno, grieving that she should sustain/a death so lingering, so full of pain/Sent Iris down to free her from her strife/ of laboring Nature, and dissolve her life/For since she died, not doomed by Heaven's decree/ of her own crime, not human casuality/end rage of love, she plunged her in despair/ The Sisters had not cut the topmost hair/ which Prosperine and they can only know/ nor made her sacred to the shades below/ Downward the various goddess took her flight/ And drew a thousand colors from the light/ (last two lines added possibly)? try to get a second opinion on this...it's been a while for me. quasimodo1

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    In the fog Charles Darnay's Avatar
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    "All powerful Juno then took pity on her (Dido) long anguish and dificult death and sent Iris down from Olympus to free her struggling spirit and loosen the fastenings of her limbs. For since she was dying not by the decree of fate or her own deserts but pitily and before her time, in a sudden blaze of maddness Prosperpina had not yet taken a lock of her golden hair or consigned her to Stygian Orcus. So Iris, bathed in dew, flew down on her saffron wings, trailing all her colours across the sky opposite the sun and hoveered over Dido's head to say "I am commanded to take a lock of hair as a solemn offering to Dis and now I free you from your body"
    I wrote a poem on a leaf and it blew away...

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    Registered User quasimodo1's Avatar
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    To A.J. PT: you might try www.online-mythology.com for background. That being said, perhaps Charles Darnay was more accurate to Virgil. quasimodo1

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    Last stanza of Book IV found here

    http://www.online-literature.com/virgil/aeneid/4/


    Then Juno, grieving that she should sustain
    A death so ling'ring, and so full of pain,
    Sent Iris down, to free her from the strife
    Of lab'ring nature, and dissolve her life.
    For since she died, not doom'd by Heav'n's decree,
    Or her own crime, but human casualty,
    And rage of love, that plung'd her in despair,
    The Sisters had not cut the topmost hair,
    Which Proserpine and they can only know;
    Nor made her sacred to the shades below.
    Downward the various goddess took her flight,
    And drew a thousand colors from the light;
    Then stood above the dying lover's head,
    And said: "I thus devote thee to the dead.
    This off'ring to th' infernal gods I bear."
    Thus while she spoke, she cut the fatal hair:
    The struggling soul was loos'd, and life dissolv'd in air.
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    thank you BUT i guess i did not make myself clear when asking for help- i was wondering if i could get some help on the scansion of the lines...not translation... scansion being what letters of the words have long marks, dactyles, dypthongs, liquids...

  12. #12
    Registered User quasimodo1's Avatar
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    to A.J. PT: please go to http://vergil/classics.upenn.edu/aenl.scan.html hope this helps quasimodo1

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