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Thread: Newbie Question: Can classics be read too soon?

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    Newbie Question: Can classics be read too soon?

    I'm obviously new, so...hello.

    I'm a classical-style home school mom who would like some opinions about James Fennimore Cooper's Deerslayer. What are the odds a ninth grader will actually appreciate this book? I'm sure most of my students in our co-op can wade through it, but will they actually give a rip about it?

    I'd love some opinions.

    Thanks,
    Lynn

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    Quote Originally Posted by JLynnR View Post
    I'm obviously new, so...hello.

    I'm a classical-style home school mom who would like some opinions about James Fennimore Cooper's Deerslayer. What are the odds a ninth grader will actually appreciate this book? I'm sure most of my students in our co-op can wade through it, but will they actually give a rip about it?

    I'd love some opinions.

    Thanks,
    Lynn
    I don't know exactly how 9th grade correlates with the British educational system so I'm not sure how old the child (but, at a guess, 14? 15?) so not sure on the age thing. However, testing shows that when young students are exposed to the classics and made to read them (Shakespeare, and so forth) that, due to the complex sentence structures (and numerable other qualities), a child will often develop a much better understanding of words. Furthermore, those exposed to the classics at an early teenage age tend to do far better in school in later years.

    I don't think there's any question on the matter. Encourage your child to read it now!

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    As from an enjoyment perspective, I read it when I was about 15. I can remember quite enjoying it.

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    Fingertips of Fury B-Mental's Avatar
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    I think its a great choice for that age group... depends on the child, but worth a shot.
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    Lady of Smilies Nightshade's Avatar
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    I dont think Ive ever heard of deerslayer but as a whole I read classics when I was 12-15 couldnt get hold of anything else I idnt always take away the 'coreect deeper meaning' but I did enjoy most of them.

    Now the real reason Ive stuck my nose in JLynnR hello and welcome do you mind if I ask what classic style homeschooling is ? Only we have a quite active thread in the general Chat section on homescholing its pros and cons and I dont think we have a homschooling mom.
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    Registered User Aiculík's Avatar
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    If these children are 14-15 years old, I think they are too old for Deerslayer. I read it at 12 and was I thought it was stupid. Later I found out what Twain said about it - and I second to that.

    But as for other classics, I think it's not too soon.

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    Serious business Taliesin's Avatar
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    As a half-offtopic, yes, classics can be read too soon. When one reads some classical work too soon, he/she can develop such a deep resentment against the work that he/she won't want to read it when he/she is mature enough.

    But that is not the case of Deerslayer at 15. We think that 15 is quite agood time to read Deerslayer, even perhaps a bit late.
    If you believe even a half of this post, you are severely mistaken.

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    Lady of Smilies Nightshade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taliesin View Post
    As a half-offtopic, yes, classics can be read too soon. When one reads some classical work too soon, he/she can develop such a deep resentment against the work that he/she won't want to read it when he/she is mature enough.
    .
    Very true, one of the reasons probably that I HATE a tale of 2 cities, although I did read it again fairly recently and didnt mind it half as much
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    Got juxtaposition? Dante Wodehouse's Avatar
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    I would recommend Last of the Mohicans rather than Deerslayer. It is widely recognized that it is a better book, and the entire series could be read fairly easily by a ninth grader. Classics are always a great choice.
    Last edited by Dante Wodehouse; 04-03-2007 at 09:25 AM.

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    Boll Weevil cuppajoe_9's Avatar
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    I would take issue with the statement that anything inflicted by Fennimore Cooper is a 'classic', per se, but I'm sure a ninth grader would have no trouble with it.
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