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Thread: homeschooling

  1. #31
    laudator temporis acti andave_ya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koa View Post
    It's not (just) about it being repressive, but well it gives you its point of view... which is just one point of view... I know this is my experience, but the only people I've met in church were hypocrites.



    Yes, and that's life.
    I suppose you only read 18-century novels, you have never watched TV, you have never spent a few hours with someone who swears?

    Question: is homeschooling commonly related to being religious?



    Yes, true, but again, that's life. That's why I said it seems repressive to me... you need to make your own mistakes and learn from that... It's like trying to preserve someone by keeping them living in a bubble, but the bubble will have to break sooner or later I guess...

    I'm sorry the only Christians you've met turned out to be hypocrites...Even if I am a Christian, I am far from perfect merely because I am human.

    About what I read, that's basically the lot of it. 18th century stuff. It's only recently I've been getting into some more modern literature. My favorite author is Dorothy L. Sayers and she wrote primarily in the 30s...The movies I like are Lord of the Rings, Pirates of the Caribbean, and lots of old movie musicals from the 30s and 40s. Hence my Ginger Rogers avatar. I don't watch a lot of tv simply because there are no shows I like.


    Is homeschooling commonly related to being religious?:
    I don't really know. Sorry. Don't have that wide of an experience.

    true that's life, but it's jarring after a course in polite British novels. It just seems really tacky to me to speak of improper things when there is SO much else to talk about! And the swearing? I told my Mom about the swearing and her opinion was that people who swear left and right really don't have a grasp of language and I agree with her.

    And about making your own mistakes and learning from them, that option is open to whoever wants it. As time has almost always proven my parents right, I opt to do what my parents would. Not because I have to but because it makes sense.

    Pensive: your parents don't teach you through college. Does that answer you somewhat? My Mom loves books, but just because she does doesn't mean she can teach me library science. As for discussing things with people your age, sometimes you don't want to. All the girls my age are interested in boys, makeup, breakups and other stuff that I'm not interested in. Whenever I try to speak to them I end up being a sounding board for all their fears, regrets, tears, and jokes that aren't even funny. They aren't interested in anything vaguely philosophical or even smacking of academic stuff. At the most I'll be able to talk to them about movies. That's all well and good, but even Johnny Depp gets boring after a while. I don't want to talk about boys, I'm fifteen, I don't want to get romantically attached until after college and I have never been romantic with anyone in my entire life!

    I am sorry for such an outburst, it's just that the idea of trying to talk to someone whose head is stuck in a different cloud than mine is really maddening. It's here on the LitNet that people talk sense. And people that live in Europe or perhaps in other parts of the USA than California.
    "The time has come," the Walrus said,
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    Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
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    And why the sea is boiling hot--
    And whether pigs have wings."

  2. #32
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andave_ya View Post
    Is homeschooling commonly related to being religious?:
    I don't really know. Sorry. Don't have that wide of an experience.
    I've heard of both religious and non-religious people being home schooled. I don't think it has anything to do with it, although perhaps it motivates certain people to withdraw from the school system if it doesn't share their values.

    Pensive: your parents don't teach you through college. Does that answer you somewhat? My Mom loves books, but just because she does doesn't mean she can teach me library science. As for discussing things with people your age, sometimes you don't want to. All the girls my age are interested in boys, makeup, breakups and other stuff that I'm not interested in. Whenever I try to speak to them I end up being a sounding board for all their fears, regrets, tears, and jokes that aren't even funny. They aren't interested in anything vaguely philosophical or even smacking of academic stuff. At the most I'll be able to talk to them about movies. That's all well and good, but even Johnny Depp gets boring after a while. I don't want to talk about boys, I'm fifteen, I don't want to get romantically attached until after college and I have never been romantic with anyone in my entire life!
    I've never heard of home schooling beyond high school. A parent that I know that home schools also arranges when possible to get other home schooling parents with their kids together for a group class. Also there are other activities that you can sign up your child for (sports, museums, music, dance, etc) that allows interaction with others their age. The children are not isolated in a bubble if that's the concern.

    I am sorry for such an outburst, it's just that the idea of trying to talk to someone whose head is stuck in a different cloud than mine is really maddening. It's here on the LitNet that people talk sense. And people that live in Europe or perhaps in other parts of the USA than California
    No need to apologize, Andave. You sound like a really bright and well adjusted young lady.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensive View Post
    Then, how are you going to cope with people in your adult life?
    What's the impact or reason that it's bad to not being able to cope with people in your adult life? How dose this link to homeschooling if you are talking about after college?
    Could you please explain what you mean by that?

    Another great benefit of homeschooling is that the parents have the freedom to choose the curriculum that their children will use. Parents don't really have control over the curriculum of the public schools. So if the curriculum doesn't have the same beliefs or teaching style, then your children get taught something that you don't want them to get taught.
    Last edited by juketay; 03-26-2007 at 06:33 PM.

  4. #34
    dreamer genoveva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koa View Post

    Question: is homeschooling commonly related to being religious?


    My experience within the homeschooling community is that you have polar opposite extremes within the community. You have the very religious who homeschool their children because the public school system here in the USA does not include any religious teachings, and they want their child to learn creationism, etc. Plus, many interpret the Bible as telling parents to be their children's teacher so they interpret that as needing to homeschool.

    On the other spectrum, there are very liberal families who don't send their children to public schools because they think the school system is dysfunctional, brainwashing, controlling, etc. etc.

    It is so interesting that you have these two extremes that highly value the same thing: the freedom to teach your own.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pensive View Post

    I think "learning in school" ought to be compulsary.


    Eek. Perhaps in other countries where there are not laws protecting children's rights or countries where females are largely oppressed, but here in the USA I would advocate for just the opposite. Unfortunately, every state except for Texas has compulsary schooling laws. Personally, I don't like the idea of anything being compulsary. Freedom of choice rules!

    Quote Originally Posted by Koa View Post
    It's a way to form a personality.

    this homeschooling thing seems to me like a form of repression (American style?
    It is really interesting to hear other world view perspectives on homeschooling.
    In the USA, many homeschoolers find school to be a form of repression. Outside of it, you have so much more freedom. The world is our classroom!

    And, as far as forming a personality....well, personalities get shaped outside of school too... There are so many elements regarding this...family, friends, genetics?

    Quote Originally Posted by Koa View Post
    I think that another reason for real schools is that you learn to face real life issues like having to get up stupidly early, have to take an overcrowded bus, face unpleasant schoolmates and unpleasnt teachers, the possibility of unfair situations, the pressure of working for a long time without holidays, of having to do things you detest... all very unpleasant but all very typical of real life.
    But, real life does not need to be unpleasant. Yes, there are some unpleasant things in this world, but why purposefully include more unpleasant experiences in your life? This doesn't make sense. More good things and pleasant experiences are what we need!

    Social justice activist Angela Davis says that "schools are prep schools for prison!"

    Quote Originally Posted by andave_ya View Post
    My teacher is also my Mom, but just because that is the case it doesn't mean she lets me sleep till ten everyday. I have homework. Responsibilities. Chores. Places to go and things to see.

    children need guiding and won't discipline themselves.
    What's wrong with sleeping until 10am everyday? Sleep is very important!
    One of the greatest things about homeschooling is that you can make your own schedule. That could include sleeping until 10am. Learning doesn't start at 8am and end at 3pm. Learning can happen any time/ all the time!

    Also, I highly disagree with you when you say that children won't discipline themselves. I think this underestimates children/ youth in general. I know lots of children who discipline themselves quite well. It's amazing what children can do if they are only given the opportunity and trust.

    Quote Originally Posted by Koa View Post
    I wouldn't be able to do 2+2 with that system, because I'd never ask someone to teach me that
    You probably would never have to ask someone to teach you what 2+2 is because you would probably figure it out yourself, naturally. Hmm..2 pieces of chocolate + 2 pieces of chocolate = 4 yummy!

    Quote Originally Posted by andave_ya View Post
    Kids just don't listen, either. I have a little friend who didn't know who Christopher Columbus was!
    That is ridiculous! Of course children listen. I find the flip side to be more true. Adults often do not listen to children.

    Anyhow, at least here in the USA, school systems brainwash kids into thinking Christopher Columbus was some kind of hero who discovered the USA. Like, no one else had figured that out before... Plus, the school system suppresses the fact that Christopher Columbus raped, killed, and kidnapped natives. For more info see James W. Loewen's Lies My Teacher Told Me About Christopher Columbus: What Your History Books Got Wrong and Rethinking Schools' Rethinking Columbus.
    "I have so often dreamed of you that you become unreal." ~ Robert Desnos

  5. #35
    Metamorphosing Pensive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juketay View Post
    What's the impact or reason that it's bad to not being able to cope with people in your adult life? How dose this link to homeschooling if you are talking about after college?
    Could you please explain what you mean by that?
    She/he mentioned in her post that she is free from the company of drugists and all that by being home-schooled. But the thing is you can't spend your adult life in such a sheltered way. You have to cope with people who drink. You have to sometimes bear the company of people who oppose your views. And this is what schools teach you: to spend time with all sorts of people and to learn how to cope with them even though their views are different from yours.

    It links with "homeschooling" because, if you are not taught something in the beginning, it's more difficult (possible, yes, but hard) to get used to those ways later in your life. Wouldn't you feel a lot more comfortable if you have been through that "out-of-your-world" atmosphere?

    Quote Originally Posted by andave_ya View Post
    I

    Pensive: your parents don't teach you through college. Does that answer you somewhat? My Mom loves books, but just because she does doesn't mean she can teach me library science.
    Where did I say that they do?

    As for discussing things with people your age, sometimes you don't want to. All the girls my age are interested in boys, makeup, breakups and other stuff that I'm not interested in. Whenever I try to speak to them I end up being a sounding board for all their fears, regrets, tears, and jokes that aren't even funny. They aren't interested in anything vaguely philosophical or even smacking of academic stuff. At the most I'll be able to talk to them about movies. That's all well and good, but even Johnny Depp gets boring after a while. I don't want to talk about boys, I'm fifteen, I don't want to get romantically attached until after college and I have never been romantic with anyone in my entire life!
    Again, this is what I have been trying to give my views on: you say the girls are interested in boys but you are not. Is it necessary you also get interested in boys just because they are? Do you really have to get influenced by others? You can't possibly run away from school just because of this. Why leave a good education? Why waste the opportunity of having proper specialized teachers just for the sake of some differences in opinions? Why leave a school where you have got other people to compete with you?

    I am sorry for such an outburst, it's just that the idea of trying to talk to someone whose head is stuck in a different cloud than mine is really maddening. It's here on the LitNet that people talk sense. And people that live in Europe or perhaps in other parts of the USA than California.
    Oh, you know what? We all think we are the only ones who talk sense (well, majority). And don't worry, and don't judge others too harshly. Maybe, they like their life-style. Let them have the time of their life if they prefer it that way, as long as they are not hurting you. Many girls dress in short blouses and all this - but it doesn't make them bad unless they start being nasty to you or some other person for no reason at all.

    And don't worry. We all are something like this. We like to express ourselves when we feel the things around us are not fine, not caring if we are right or wrong in our own judgement.
    I sang of leaves, of leaves of gold, and leaves of gold there grew.

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    Quote Originally Posted by andave_ya View Post
    If the child doesn't understand something, you can take as long as you need to teach it to him. Case in point: me. Last school year I did Algebra I and it took me the entire year, summer, and partway into this school year to finish it but with the major grace of God I finished!
    I think this goes somewhat to the point I made earlier: Do you not think that if you had access to a trained maths teacher on a daily basis you would have been able to resolve your problems with algebra in a more timely fashion?
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    weer mijn koekjestrommel Schokokeks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by genoveva View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Pensive
    I think "learning in school" ought to be compulsary.


    Eek. Perhaps in other countries where there are not laws protecting children's rights or countries where females are largely oppressed
    Such as Germany, for example ?
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    User juketay's Avatar
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    You are right Pensive. In order for children to become assimilated into society properly, it is important to have a variety of experiences and be exposed to differing opinions and views. This enables them when they are an adult to think for themselves and form their own opinions. In a way this is exactly what public education does not promote; public education is for the lowest common denominator and influencing all of the students to share the same views ("group-think") and thought-control through various means, including peer-pressure. (If you want more you can pm me)
    Go to your local public school, walk down the hallways and see what behaviors you would want your child to emulate.

    In the public school system, children are segregated by age, and have very little interaction with other adults (except for their teachers). This environment only promotes alienation from different age groups, especially adults. This is beginning to look like the real socialization trouble.


    Homeschooling in no way “alienates you from society”. The “real world” is all around us; through the TV, newspaper, grocery store, driving down the street, gas station and weekend outings. Just because you homeschool doesn’t mean that you live in a bubble.
    Last edited by juketay; 03-27-2007 at 01:18 PM.

  9. #39
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    Wow, I can't believe this thread is still going strong and such passion on both sides. Great discussion.


    Quote Originally Posted by juketay View Post
    Go to your local public school, walk down the hallways and see what behaviors you would want your child to emulate.
    This ties in with the other thread out there on youths and their behavior.

    In the public school system, children are segregated by age, and have very little interaction with other adults (except for their teachers). This environment only promotes alienation from different age groups, especially adults. This is beginning to look like the real socialization trouble.
    That is a great point that I've never heard anyone else make. Good insight Juke. I bet lots of bad behavior is picked up from other kids. More adult interaction would serve the kids well.

    Homeschooling in no way “alienates you from society”. The “real world” is all around us; through the TV, newspaper, grocery store, driving down the street, gas station and weekend outings. Just because you homeschool doesn’t mean that you live in a bubble.
    I said somthing similar. What is surprising to me is that many teachers prefer their kids home schooled. They know how bad schools can be. There are pluses and minues to both sides here, but I think homeschooling is on balance a plus. If I had children and the time to teach them, I would choose homeschooling.
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    laudator temporis acti andave_ya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensive View Post
    Again, this is what I have been trying to give my views on: you say the girls are interested in boys but you are not. Is it necessary you also get interested in boys just because they are? Do you really have to get influenced by others? You can't possibly run away from school just because of this. Why leave a good education? Why waste the opportunity of having proper specialized teachers just for the sake of some differences in opinions? Why leave a school where you have got other people to compete with you?
    No, they can like whatever they please and I don't have to like it, but then, don't make me talk to them. It's not for lack of trying that I say this, Pensive, I KNOW people like that and seriously, I'd rather watch Barney the purple dinosaur.
    Furthermore, I don't have to be influenced, I am influenced regardless. Even though I like to think I am beyond it, I'm not. As I said in an earlier post, I've started taking college courses where people curse every other word and not think anything of it. Coming from a Christian background, every word was like an electric shock but now I find the words creeping into my thoughts and I find that seriously alarming.
    Differences in opinion? I don't care if people believe that God doesn't exist as long as they don't try to make me believe He doesn't. It isn't differences of opinion, it's differences in aspects of faith. Public schools want to brainwash people into believing evolution without even telling them of creationist viewpoint. Public schools don't want people to believe in God because the propaganda is that man is self-sufficient, all-wise and all-powerful. All I need to do is look at history to see for myself that it is otherwise.
    And, you're assuming my mom is untrained. My Mom had a thorough education through college in Lebanon. She was computer programmer, trained in logic. When one has mastered logic, other stuff isn't difficult to master.

    I think the main problem is that people see homeschoolers as unstylish lazy slobs who don't care anything about education. Please, please, dig underneath that surface and find the dedicated people. Visit

    www.hslda.org

    for more information.

    Competition. Why do I need competition if I already want to learn?

    Real life experiences. I don't live in a bubble. I take classes outside my homeschool courses. I go on field trips. I go on the internet. I take vacations. I go to concerts. I go shopping. I take road trips. I visit friends. I read the newspaper. I watch TV. I go to the movies.
    The only difference is that I select what I want to see, and that doesn't include young people swearing themselves blue and doing all sorts of unpleasant stuff.

    And finally, Pensive, I don't think I'm particularly amazing. I understand a multitude of stuff but the only place I can actually be "brilliant" is when I am speaking of obscure literary stuff that nobody cares about.

    I think this goes somewhat to the point I made earlier: Do you not think that if you had access to a trained maths teacher on a daily basis you would have been able to resolve your problems with algebra in a more timely fashion?
    My Mom understood everything perfectly, and if that didn't work, my uncle is an algebra teacher. The only problem was with myself. It took me longer to comprehend the material.
    Last edited by andave_ya; 03-27-2007 at 03:33 PM.
    "The time has come," the Walrus said,
    "To talk of many things:
    Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
    Of cabbages--and kings--
    And why the sea is boiling hot--
    And whether pigs have wings."

  11. #41
    Drama Queen Koa's Avatar
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    I fully agree with every single syllable written by Pensive.

    Isn't it funny how all (or most) people here who believe in homeschooling are from the USA? It never ceases to amaze me how the USA-mentality is completely different from what I'm used to and mostly impossible for me to comprehend.

    Quote Originally Posted by andave_ya View Post
    As for discussing things with people your age, sometimes you don't want to. All the girls my age are interested in boys, makeup, breakups and other stuff that I'm not interested in. Whenever I try to speak to them I end up being a sounding board for all their fears, regrets, tears, and jokes that aren't even funny. They aren't interested in anything vaguely philosophical or even smacking of academic stuff. At the most I'll be able to talk to them about movies. That's all well and good, but even Johnny Depp gets boring after a while. I don't want to talk about boys, I'm fifteen, I don't want to get romantically attached until after college and I have never been romantic with anyone in my entire life!
    Well, maybe you are like that because you have never related with people your age? And I don't mean that you should be the same as them, but I think that this is giving you a reason not to ever mingle with people who are different from you. As a teenager, I used to be very selective, in a way I understand some of your concerns... when I was about 12 I didn't care about talking of boys and clothes, I did care about books and later on music, and that's why I completely dismissed (?) the group of people I grew up with - we had really little in common. Then I went to high school and that's where I made my long-lasting friends, because many of us shared similar interests, views, experiences (not all of us, there were the slutty girls I had nothing in common with, but a lot of people were like me, with no other friends to share things with, and we became close and in some cases still are). So I know where you are coming from to some extent, and maybe later in life it will change, as it is different for me now - just last night I was thinking of how my American friend is different from me in her ways and values, she's addicted to shopping and clothes since she was 9 and I wouldnt even care what I was wearing till I was 17, she had the typical teenage 'romance' experiences while I've never been 'romantically attached', as you put it, till I was 20... Yet, I had a pleasant experience at school. I understand this can go either way and school was where I was fitting, while the rest of society wasn't. I didn't like to go out, at Uni I did study on Sundays out of boredom and overhear on Mondays conversations about amazing weekends other people had... I'm not sure where I'm heading to, but maybe what I want to say is that school doesn't forbid you to be yourself and get bored of Johnny Depp (mmmm Johnny Depp ) if you're willing to fight for that. This way you have it more comfortable, but maybe you're not developing the skills to defend your personality from peer pressure etc. As Pensy said, it makes me wonder how you'll cope with people and things in your adult life.
    And of course I don't mean to judge you and this 'you' can be any person, all I know is what you said here so I'm certainly not drawing conclusions or judgements, juts imagining scenarios to prove my opinion...

    Ehy, can I ask you, do you study a foreign language in your programme? How is language learning dealt with in general in homeschooling, assuming not all parents are fluent in another language?

    But, real life does not need to be unpleasant. Yes, there are some unpleasant things in this world, but why purposefully include more unpleasant experiences in your life? This doesn't make sense. More good things and pleasant experiences are what we need!
    Well I personally prefer to be prepared for the worst Which is, for me, the bubble we are talking about, not just a social bubble which, as you all say and I guess I can agree, is not always the case. But a bubble of protection from reality.

    What's wrong with sleeping until 10am everyday? Sleep is very important!
    One of the greatest things about homeschooling is that you can make your own schedule. That could include sleeping until 10am. Learning doesn't start at 8am and end at 3pm. Learning can happen any time/ all the time!
    Then let's hope that your homeschooled-sleeping-till-10 child will find a job that starts at 11 every day, because they might not like to get used to the idea of a real-world kind of discipline... (I'm lazy enough being a University student, when I have to go to work early I feel it's a tragedy and wonder how I did 6 days a week when I used to go to school )

    Also, I highly disagree with you when you say that children won't discipline themselves. I think this underestimates children/ youth in general. I know lots of children who discipline themselves quite well. It's amazing what children can do if they are only given the opportunity and trust.
    I do underestimate youth I also base this on myself, and I know that discipline is my first enemy


    You probably would never have to ask someone to teach you what 2+2 is because you would probably figure it out yourself, naturally. Hmm..2 pieces of chocolate + 2 pieces of chocolate = 4 yummy!
    I'm still not sure I would know that's called 'four'

    Anyhow, at least here in the USA, school systems brainwash kids into thinking Christopher Columbus was some kind of hero who discovered the USA. Like, no one else had figured that out before... Plus, the school system suppresses the fact that Christopher Columbus raped, killed, and kidnapped natives. For more info see James W. Loewen's Lies My Teacher Told Me About Christopher Columbus: What Your History Books Got Wrong and Rethinking Schools' Rethinking Columbus.
    Pardon me the very rude joke, but no one can be an hero for having discovered "the USA". And to my knowledge he discovered a continent called America, and to be really fussy the USA certainly didn't exist back then. My pendaticness (?) aside, I was never taught nor told that he killed and raped, though I know that all those who subsequently conquered America did, so why not him. We don't spend a substantial amount of time on him though, and what is also funny is that in Italy we're told he was Italian, in Spain they're told he was Spanish or anyway that it's Spain's merit because it was Spain that gave him the ships... but I digress.
    I don't believe all I'm told, so what makes your sources more believable than those used at school? The fact that they're not officially used? Any school student can go out of school and deepen his/her knowledge by reading the book you recommend or others. Not many do, of course, and those who do are considered nerds for sure. I was also thinking how funny it is how you consider school so bad while I'm used to seeing kids who like school as some kind of 'nerds', I mean you know, the clever kid that only likes to study as opposed to the lazy other ones...

    Quote Originally Posted by andave_ya View Post
    Public schools want to brainwash people into believing evolution without even telling them of creationist viewpoint. Public schools don't want people to believe in God because the propaganda is that man is self-sufficient, all-wise and all-powerful. All I need to do is look at history to see for myself that it is otherwise.
    History and faith are two different things. Anyway this is another discussion... As for what is taught at school, couldn't for example you go to school and listen to what is told there, and be religious at home? I don't know, I can't see a school totally deprived of slight religious concepts since (unfortunately) in my country, despite being officially secular, religion still pervades and influences way too many aspects of society and politics (though maybe it's less prevalent in schools now that we have so many kids from other cultures/religions)... we had one hour of religious education per week, which wasn't compulsory so if someone didn't want to hear it they could opt out (it's still like that). I did came home once asking my mum what really happened, did we evolve from monkeys or did God created us? She gave me her explanation...

    I think the main problem is that people see homeschoolers as unstylish lazy slobs who don't care anything about education. Please, please, dig underneath that surface and find the dedicated people.
    I have the opposite idea, since I first heard of this concept I imagined homeschoolers as bookworms that spend all their time studying and being intellectual instead of doing things appropriate for their age... like throwing in the occasional swearing to feel 'adult' and being generally silly.
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  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koa View Post
    Isn't it funny how all (or most) people here who believe in homeschooling are from the USA? It never ceases to amaze me how the USA-mentality is completely different from what I'm used to and mostly impossible for me to comprehend.
    Yeah, it amazes me too. And I think it comes down to we in the US don't trust and want to rely on the government for things. It sucks away our freedom. We feel that when we can do it ourselves, we pefer to.
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    weer mijn koekjestrommel Schokokeks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koa View Post
    Ehy, can I ask you, do you study a foreign language in your programme? How is language learning dealt with in general in homeschooling, assuming not all parents are fluent in another language?
    Do you necessarily have to, if English is your first language ?
    "Where mind meets matter, both should woo!"
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  14. #44
    Metamorphosing Pensive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juketay View Post
    You are right Pensive. In order for children to become assimilated into society properly, it is important to have a variety of experiences and be exposed to differing opinions and views. This enables them when they are an adult to think for themselves and form their own opinions. In a way this is exactly what public education does not promote; public education is for the lowest common denominator and influencing all of the students to share the same views ("group-think") and thought-control through various means, including peer-pressure. (If you want more you can pm me)
    Go to your local public school, walk down the hallways and see what behaviors you would want your child to emulate.

    In the public school system, children are segregated by age, and have very little interaction with other adults (except for their teachers). This environment only promotes alienation from different age groups, especially adults. This is beginning to look like the real socialization trouble.

    Homeschooling in no way “alienates you from society”. The “real world” is all around us; through the TV, newspaper, grocery store, driving down the street, gas station and weekend outings. Just because you homeschool doesn’t mean that you live in a bubble.
    Okay, the image you give of pubic schools doesn't seem very pleasant, but here, the problem lies with "schools". If only good conditions would be provided there, things would be better. Schooling in an institution should be made compulsary because it makes sure that a child is getting education. I don't know whether you will ever understand it or not, but with the culture like that in my country, what's necessary is education and here the concept of homeschooling means the child wouldn't be taught much about Geography, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Maths (in most cases). Wouldn't it be better if the Government makes this necessary for children to go to schools? Many children in my country don't have telivisions, newspapers, computers, and don't have proper access to books. On the other hand, if they go to a public school, they have a chance of getting a scholarship, and books for free if they give good result. And remember the geography and history of your school is not easy to learn without having books/proper guidance.

    And now you will say that children can have their parents teaching them but what should they do if their parents don't even know how to write down their names? And this is the condition in most of the developing countries. There are even some parents who think "education" would take their children nowhere. If only government set school compulsary, parents will have to send their children to schools.

    Quote Originally Posted by andave_ya View Post
    No, they can like whatever they please and I don't have to like it, but then, don't make me talk to them. It's not for lack of trying that I say this, Pensive, I KNOW people like that and seriously, I'd rather watch Barney the purple dinosaur.
    Who says you have to have long friendly conversations with them? You just have to learn to live with them, bear the sight of them without resenting them.

    Furthermore, I don't have to be influenced, I am influenced regardless. Even though I like to think I am beyond it, I'm not. As I said in an earlier post, I've started taking college courses where people curse every other word and not think anything of it. Coming from a Christian background, every word was like an electric shock but now I find the words creeping into my thoughts and I find that seriously alarming.
    Weren't you yourself critisizing the girls you wear make-up? If you have a right to critisize, then they do have it as well.

    Differences in opinion? I don't care if people believe that God doesn't exist as long as they don't try to make me believe He doesn't. It isn't differences of opinion, it's differences in aspects of faith. Public schools want to brainwash people into believing evolution without even telling them of creationist viewpoint. Public schools don't want people to believe in God because the propaganda is that man is self-sufficient, all-wise and all-powerful. All I need to do is look at history to see for myself that it is otherwise.
    I am sorry for that, didn't know public schools at your place were like that. In my area, they are vice-versa as a matter of fact.

    And, you're assuming my mom is untrained. My Mom had a thorough education through college in Lebanon. She was computer programmer, trained in logic. When one has mastered logic, other stuff isn't difficult to master.
    Oh my goodness, why would I assume your mother is trained or untrained? It doesn't matter, really. What matters is that every child doesn't have a trained mother. Neither do they have uncles who are professors of Algebra.

    I think the main problem is that people see homeschoolers as unstylish lazy slobs who don't care anything about education. Please, please, dig underneath that surface and find the dedicated people. Visit

    www.hslda.org

    for more information.
    I never saw homeschoolers as unstylish lazy slobs or something like that. Nor do have I any reasons to think so. My reason to why "schooling should be made compulsary" has nothing to do with this. I have explained this in the very start of this post.

    Competition. Why do I need competition if I already want to learn?
    Wouldn't it be easier for you to learn with a group of students who "have interest in studies"?

    Real life experiences. I don't live in a bubble. I take classes outside my homeschool courses. I go on field trips. I go on the internet. I take vacations. I go to concerts. I go shopping. I take road trips. I visit friends. I read the newspaper. I watch TV. I go to the movies.
    The only difference is that I select what I want to see, and that doesn't include young people swearing themselves blue and doing all sorts of unpleasant stuff.
    Good for you. Being an idealist can be good, and can't be other times. You don't often come across good people in life: and afterwards you have to cope with people swearing themselves blue and doing all sorts of unpleasant stuff. I wouldn't like to go deep into that argument, for the sake of being on the topic. But even if you disagree with me here, you might agree that every child can't afford these road trips, newspapers and tv, and that's why I think schooling should be made compulsary.

    And finally, Pensive, I don't think I'm particularly amazing. I understand a multitude of stuff but the only place I can actually be "brilliant" is when I am speaking of obscure literary stuff that nobody cares about.
    When did I say you thought you were amazing? All I meant was we all stick to our opinions, otherwise why would we be here giving our opinions like this? Even if we are confused between our opinions, we do have this thought that "our opinions matter too".

    And people do care about literary stuff, at least here in this forum.

    My Mom understood everything perfectly, and if that didn't work, my uncle is an algebra teacher. The only problem was with myself. It took me longer to comprehend the material.
    As I already mentioned, everyone doesn't have an uncle who is an algebra professor or a mother who understand everything perfectly.

    I am sorry for having repeated things so many times, but couldn't restrain myself from that.
    Last edited by Pensive; 03-28-2007 at 08:07 AM.
    I sang of leaves, of leaves of gold, and leaves of gold there grew.

  15. #45
    laudator temporis acti andave_ya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koa View Post
    I fully agree with every single syllable written by Pensive.
    Thank you kindly.


    Well, maybe you are like that because you have never related with people your age? And I don't mean that you should be the same as them, but I think that this is giving you a reason not to ever mingle with people who are different from you
    My Mom felt the same way a year or so ago and always tried to push me to go talk to other girls with different interests. I tried and it just didn't work. In order for us to click, I had to change. That didn't sound appealing, but for the sake of fitting in I tried. Joining Girl Scouts, I tried to laugh and giggle without having something to laugh at. I tried to be knowledgeable about fashion. And still, whenever I said something there would be an embarrassed silence. It wasn't the girls fault that I didn't fit in; they did their best to make me feel comfortable. But it just didn't work. I left and went back to my normal self and didn't burden them with a wallflower.

    I've got tons more to say but I've got to go to class. Talk to you later.
    "The time has come," the Walrus said,
    "To talk of many things:
    Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
    Of cabbages--and kings--
    And why the sea is boiling hot--
    And whether pigs have wings."

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