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Thread: Lizzy's and Darcy's marriage

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    Lizzy's and Darcy's marriage

    As someone has suggested, I decided to start a new thread, rather than change an old one.

    So what do you guys think about their marriage ? Will it be a happy one ?

  2. #2
    yeah, there doesnt seem to be a reason for it not being happy. no chance of divorce, or sleeping around, they liek eachother, they are rich, and also upstanding people.

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    Woman from Maine sciencefan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olichka View Post
    As someone has suggested, I decided to start a new thread, rather than change an old one.

    So what do you guys think about their marriage ? Will it be a happy one ?



    I spent almost an hour preparing a post and when I went to submit it,
    I had been automatically logged off, and when I logged back in it was gone!!!





    They have a very good chance at a happy marriage.
    Last edited by sciencefan; 03-04-2007 at 03:11 PM.

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    Bibliophile JBI's Avatar
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    Austen seemed to think so. I believe her message from there marriage was "This is how a marriage should be". It's not as if they are real people though, and their story ends when the book does. I would have to say that judging by Austen's view on their marriage, it is intended to be a painted picture of a "proper" marriage, and a successful one. Whereas she juxtaposes the other marriages against this one, and shows us all their faults, I understand the marriage of Lizzie and Mr. Darcy to be her image of the "perfect" marriage.

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    Woman from Maine sciencefan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBI View Post
    Austen seemed to think so. I believe her message from there marriage was "This is how a marriage should be". It's not as if they are real people though, and their story ends when the book does. I would have to say that judging by Austen's view on their marriage, it is intended to be a painted picture of a "proper" marriage, and a successful one. Whereas she juxtaposes the other marriages against this one, and shows us all their faults, I understand the marriage of Lizzie and Mr. Darcy to be her image of the "perfect" marriage.
    That's a good point, and I agree with you.

    I don't think I'm really sure though what Austen thought was the best criteria for choosing a marriage partner, and whether she was actually right.

    Elizabeth feels "gratitude" toward Darcy,
    she's "proud" of him,
    and she thinks he's "very hansome".

    Darcy has decided he can't live without Elizabeth.
    He shows sacrificial, unconditional love toward her.
    That right there is the BEST SIGN that they will have a happy marriage.

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    Vinlite vin1391's Avatar
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    I think they will have a Happy marriage...maybe they'll argue but other than that they will be happy..
    "When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us." --*Helen Keller*

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    Woman from Maine sciencefan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vin1391 View Post
    I think they will have a Happy marriage...maybe they'll argue but other than that they will be happy..
    I agree.
    Certainly there will be disagreements.

    I have heard it said that if both of you always agree on everything,
    one of you isn't necessary!

  8. #8
    I see that their marriage based on understanding each other the first time they meet. Of course, Jane Austin let Lizzy has the wrong impression toward Darcy to start afterward developing their character, But isn't that a bit correct to know otherself very well first ? I mean, the whole novel, every time Lizzy and Darcy meet, some development in their character happen. I see as well that they have a great love life before they get married. I ask myself, when did they get married, and why Lizzy refuses him in his first proposal? They get married after what have they been through, they struggle, they share thoughts, they've been in the same places the whole novel and almost they've the same feeling toward each other. Then, After that, they get married.
    Last edited by spacetoon; 03-31-2007 at 01:35 AM.

  9. #9
    Registered User DahliaBlood's Avatar
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    Like all fairy tales....they lived happily ever after.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBI View Post
    Austen seemed to think so. I believe her message from there marriage was "This is how a marriage should be". It's not as if they are real people though, and their story ends when the book does. I would have to say that judging by Austen's view on their marriage, it is intended to be a painted picture of a "proper" marriage, and a successful one. Whereas she juxtaposes the other marriages against this one, and shows us all their faults, I understand the marriage of Lizzie and Mr. Darcy to be her image of the "perfect" marriage.
    Exactly, thats one of the book's main themes, whats the basis of a good marriage? There are several examples of marriage in the book: marriage based purely on money (Mr Collins and Charlotte) marriage based on good looks (and ignoring mutual understanding) (Mr Bennet and Mrs Bennet) and marriage based purely on sexual attraction or lust (Lydia and Wickham) and all are found wanting by themselves. But combine them all together and you have the perfect marriage i.e Lizzie and Darcy's.

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    Woman from Maine sciencefan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackjack Davy View Post
    Exactly, thats one of the book's main themes, whats the basis of a good marriage? There are several examples of marriage in the book: marriage based purely on money (Mr Collins and Charlotte) marriage based on good looks (and ignoring mutual understanding) (Mr Bennet and Mrs Bennet) and marriage based purely on sexual attraction or lust (Lydia and Wickham) and all are found wanting by themselves. But combine them all together and you have the perfect marriage i.e Lizzie and Darcy's.
    I've never seen anyone else state it so perfectly.
    Excellent!

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    Quote Originally Posted by sciencefan View Post

    I spent almost an hour preparing a post and when I went to submit it,
    I had been automatically logged off, and when I logged back in it was gone!!!





    They have a very good chance at a happy marriage.
    same thing has happened to me several times, most frustrating.
    "And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom."
    --Anais Nin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackjack Davy View Post
    Exactly, thats one of the book's main themes, whats the basis of a good marriage? There are several examples of marriage in the book: marriage based purely on money (Mr Collins and Charlotte) marriage based on good looks (and ignoring mutual understanding) (Mr Bennet and Mrs Bennet) and marriage based purely on sexual attraction or lust (Lydia and Wickham) and all are found wanting by themselves. But combine them all together and you have the perfect marriage i.e Lizzie and Darcy's.
    I never thought of it as an analysis of the best ingredients of a marriage, but i think you're right. Liz and darcy, aren't they likely to live in a perfect world.

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    Woman from Maine sciencefan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackjack Davy View Post
    Exactly, thats one of the book's main themes, whats the basis of a good marriage? There are several examples of marriage in the book: marriage based purely on money (Mr Collins and Charlotte) marriage based on good looks (and ignoring mutual understanding) (Mr Bennet and Mrs Bennet) and marriage based purely on sexual attraction or lust (Lydia and Wickham) and all are found wanting by themselves. But combine them all together and you have the perfect marriage i.e Lizzie and Darcy's.
    What part would Jane and Bingley's marriage play in this evaluation?

  15. #15

    Perfect Marriage

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackjack Davy View Post
    Exactly, thats one of the book's main themes, whats the basis of a good marriage? There are several examples of marriage in the book: marriage based purely on money (Mr Collins and Charlotte) marriage based on good looks (and ignoring mutual understanding) (Mr Bennet and Mrs Bennet) and marriage based purely on sexual attraction or lust (Lydia and Wickham) and all are found wanting by themselves. But combine them all together and you have the perfect marriage i.e Lizzie and Darcy's.
    Interesting! Are you writing from a perspective of a TV soap opera or a Hollywood melodrama? That you might have Jane Austen's prose in mind seems rather far fetched.
    You wrote of Mr Collins and Charlotte marriage as based purely on money. A clergyman's living was about 200 -300 pounds per annum. Let's suppose Lady Catherine was very generous, five hundred would still be but one quarter of the Bennet's income which was barely adequate to keep a comfortable home. I do not think that Mr. Collins and Charlotte fall in the love/fortune formula.
    Mr.Bennet's marriage was based on love, mistakenly according to Elizabeth, but the example is minor, outside of Austen's main theme.
    To characterize Lydia's and Wickham's marriage as “based purely on sexual attraction or lust”, is in my opinion, much too modern an interpretation. Austen was surely aware of sexual attraction but in the barnyard not in the courtship of either the merchant, nor of the country squires, not of the aristocracy. Had you suggested such to Austen, I suspect she would have been astonished and wondered who had invited such a rustic to the drawing room. Informed that you represented the view two centuries hence, I could imagine that she would have wished for a second Norman conquest: the French to teach manners to the modern Britons. According to her letter, Lydia marries for love and it is your job to differentiate how love differs, but lust was foreign to Austen's style.
    To suggests that Elizabeth's happiness depends on the potpourri of love, fortune and sex, is a juvenile misreading of Pride and Prejudice, in my opinion.
    I am willing to be shown mistaken in this view, debate is the best function of a forum.

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