Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: The Lone Ranger and Tonto fistfight in Heaven

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2

    The Lone Ranger and Tonto fistfight in Heaven

    by Sherman Alexie

    English Lit.

    Read the story and then we discussed it in class. All through the story the Red man is being put down by the white man.

    What I am looking for is any information about the final phone call from his white-ex-girlfriend in which he asks her, "Where do we go from here?" and she responds, "I don't know. I want to change the world."

    Is Alexie saying that the this Red Man has been broken by society to the point where he can no longer aspire to change the world but she, a white woman can? Or, does her comment imply that she want's to change society by showing them that an inter-racial relationship can work?

    Our class says one thing and our prof says the opposet. We cite contextual evidence in the story, but she insists that if we had read more of Alexie's works, we would understand more.

    Thank you for your help

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2
    Forgive me, but have people just not read this?

    Am I in an incorrect forum?

    Did I do some social faux paux?

  3. #3
    Just so you do not feel ignored - I have never heard of Sherman Alexie or the story, sorry. But you are in the correct forum. I hope somebody will be able help you.
    "Man was made for joy and woe;
    And when this we rightly know
    Through the world we safely go" Blake

  4. #4
    Right in the happy button IWilKikU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Waynesboro, Virginia. The beautiful Shenandoah Valley
    Posts
    1,304
    yeah, sorry, never heard of it.
    ...Also baby duck hat would be good for parties.

  5. #5
    dreamer genoveva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    592
    Surely people have heard of this fabulous collection of short stories by now!? Current thoughts?
    "I have so often dreamed of you that you become unreal." ~ Robert Desnos

  6. #6
    Alea iacta est. mortalterror's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    LA
    Posts
    1,905
    Blog Entries
    39
    I've read one or two of his short stories. They are good, but I haven't read the one you are talking about. I thought Sherman Alexie would be more widely known, but it's possible that he's just popular in the Northwestern United States. He taught a class at my college, so his books were in the curriculum there. I thought they were intelligent and funny.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1
    This book is really interesting but i find that not many people have read it. To answer zetryls question i would say that the girlfriend would like to change the world by making their relationship work. I think you are right about how alexie has been so broken down by society based on his race it is hard for him to believe he can make any difference.

  8. #8
    Registered User sithkittie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    79
    Chiming in on this as much as I can. I read this book a long time ago, so I'm not 100% clear on details anymore - that and I would find it amazing if the OP from 2004 still has the same question in mind. I wanted to see what discussion this might generate though, and readerlit23, I noticed it was your first post here, so hi.

    I saw Alexie speak once at my university. He successfully managed to insult all several hundred people in the audience. It was quite amazing, but I think I'm one of few who was more amused than insulted and didn't leave ticked off at him. My creative writing prof at the time was the same one who taught NA lit, so our (very small) class went together, and pretty much my whole group with one exception was annoyed with him. I think it was about the time The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian came out. I remember they were selling it there, but I haven't read it. I've only read Lone Ranger and Tonto and Indian Killer. I like that book a lot better than Lone Ranger and Tonto. I just wasn't a fan of how it was set up. I had trouble connecting the stories together and pulling anything out of it. I suppose the difference would be that Lone Ranger and Tonto was a collection of short stories and Indian Killer was a novel, but I think it was the complete lack of any feeling of time connecting the stories. They're all connected, yes, but I had trouble following the "when" part which just makes it all muddled in my memory. My professor at the time was using it as an example of NA lit's tendency to do that, ignore the chronological passing of time. Another book she had us read for that was Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko, but I don't know, her method I understood, his, not so much. Ceremony, by the way, is an amazing book that everybody should read. Frustrating, make you cry, make you hate yourself and the world, but really really well written and a really good story. Also has a really interesting perspective on PTSD and cultural dealing with returning to live as a civilian.

    Venturing off topic, (or possibly back on topic?), but the perspective Alexie used in Indian Killer was really neat and probably what makes the book stick out so clearly in my mind... and I don't want to say more because of spoilers, but to anybody reading this topic going "What the heck are these people talking about?" or anybody who just hasn't read it, I would definitely recommended giving it a go. I thought it was a good deal more coherent than Lone Ranger and Tonto.

    Has anybody ever watched the movie Smoke Signals? We watched it in my class after reading Lone Ranger and Tonto. It's based on one of the stories in it... or so the wikipedia entry says, but I think the writer incorporated bits from a lot more of the book than just one story, particularly in the parts about Victor's childhood... so I don't really get why it says that. And somehow I always manage to bring movies into topics here, but it's a good one (and relevant!).
    Last edited by sithkittie; 04-04-2011 at 01:06 PM.

  9. #9
    Registered User Three Sparrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Hique et ubique?
    Posts
    171
    I saw Smoke Signals. It was a good movie and very funny too. Unfortunately I have never read the story in question but I have read some of his other stories and I thought they were quite good. I was surprised I had never heard of him before Literature class.

  10. #10
    The title interested me enough to read about it a little, and I liked what I read so I ordered it from Amazon today. Wish it was available on Kindle so I could get right at it, though.

  11. #11
    Registered User sithkittie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    79
    A couple of his books were available on the Sony ebook site a couple years ago, but for some reason they took them down. I've seen Indian Killer and I want to say Lone Ranger and Tonto (but it might have been something else) on other ebook sites, but that's all. I hadn't heard of him before my lit class either. I'm actually not surprised, at least in Michigan where I'm from. It's a ridiculously racially conscious state. @[email protected] And yeah, Smoke Signals is one of those favorites but not movies... kinda like the books I am Legend and 1984.. really good, want to watch/read again, but they leave you with a really weird feeling.

    Blasarius, let us know what you think once you get it.
    Last edited by sithkittie; 04-05-2011 at 08:10 AM.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by sithkittie View Post
    Blasarius, let us know what you think once you get it.
    Ugh. I've read about half the stories in the book, but finally I give up. There are some tolerable passages, but overall it doesn't feel like I'm reading anything remotely approaching what I think of as literature; and Alexie's themes, characters, and atmosphere are waaay too repetitive (from story to story) to qualify as simple entertainment reading.
    I'll donate it to the mini-library at the office, I think. Maybe the book will find a better audience for it there.

  13. #13
    Registered User sithkittie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    79
    Haha, yeah, I really didn't like the first read through it, and I liked only bits the second time. I'm still curious about a third round. You should check out Indian Killer though. I actually liked that one. It's better written, I think anyway.

    I don't know that he meant his work to be entertainment though. The two I've read are full of pretty serious problems. I remember a lot of alcohol abuse in Tonto and the Lone Ranger, and Indian Killer has some other major disfunctions in it, families and mental health. He succeeded better in trying to say what he wanted to say in that one though, and it's still a good story.

    At least your book will find a home that's not a trash bin. Sorry you can't even finish it.

  14. #14
    Registered User Heteronym's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    352
    I've read two stories by him, including the one on which Smoke Signals is based. I've also watched the movie, which I enjoyed more than the short-story. I've never had any will to go back to his work.

  15. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    5,046
    Blog Entries
    16
    I've read an enjoyed some of Alexie's work. I think The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian is a wonderfully funny young-adult novel, and I really like Alexie's short stories. I like his straightforward style and how he gives a real depiction of modern Native American reservation life.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •