Page 111 of 120 FirstFirst ... 1161101106107108109110111112113114115116 ... LastLast
Results 1,651 to 1,665 of 1798

Thread: Last Book You Bought and Why

  1. #1651
    Registered User duke-one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Berkeley California
    Posts
    26
    Reply to the post about Henry James' books...........
    Just finished "Portrait of a Lady". Same type of "dense" verbiage but worth the effort. Have you seen the movie version of Washington Square, The Heiress? Also worth seeing, both are period pieces, well done. KDM

  2. #1652
    tea-timing book queen bouquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    France
    Posts
    1,772
    Max Havelaar (Multatuli)
    Billy Budd, Sailor and Other Stories (Herman Melville)
    Winesburg, Ohio (Sherwood Anderson)
    Rites of Passage (William Golding)
    Fugitive Pieces (Anne Michaels)




    _______________
    Currently reading: The Lost Honour of Katharina Blum (Heinrich Böll)
    "He lives most gaily who knows best how to deceive himself. Ha-ha!"
    - CRIME AND PUNISHMENT
    (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)

  3. #1653
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    344
    Just received The Iliad in the Richmond Lattimore translation today. It's the large hardcover tome with Leonard Baskin illustrations. A fantastic translation and book wrapped into one!

  4. #1654
    All are at the crossroads qimissung's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Lost in the bell's curve
    Posts
    5,123
    Blog Entries
    66
    I stopped by Half Price Books-my favorite book store-and got, in this order: CBGB, Decades of Graffiti; Identify and Draw North American Birds, A Field Guide for the Artist and Naturalist; Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain (Maybe I will actually learn to draw-I am at once hopeful and skeptical); and last, but certainly not least, On Writing, A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King and Bird by Bird, Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott. I am very excited. I love bookstores!
    "The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its' own reason for existing." ~ Albert Einstein
    "Remember, no matter where you go, there you are." Buckaroo Bonzai
    "Some people say I done alright for a girl." Melanie Safka

  5. #1655
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,780
    Blog Entries
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Vota View Post
    Romance of the Three Kingdoms
    Outlaws of the Marsh

    Two classics of Chinese literature. My book collection is heavily "Western Canon" biased, so I've been trying to fill in here and there with great works from other countries and cultures.

    What do you know! I'm reading RotTK right now. What translation did you get? I'm reading the Moss Roberts, and I'm finding it pretty heavy going.

    I would recommend Tyler's translation of The Tale of Genji, if you're curious about Eastern literature.

  6. #1656
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    344
    Quote Originally Posted by Lykren View Post
    What do you know! I'm reading RotTK right now. What translation did you get? I'm reading the Moss Roberts, and I'm finding it pretty heavy going.

    I would recommend Tyler's translation of The Tale of Genji, if you're curious about Eastern literature.
    I have a nice, 2 volume hardcover edition in slipcase of The Tale of Genji. It's the Edward G. Seidensticker, which I had seen recommended by Harold Bloom for it's faithful, if dryer translation.

    It's amusing when I think about my Eastern literature exposure; I've read many books about martial arts, philosophy, the Tao, Chi etc, but no actual literature per se.

  7. #1657
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,780
    Blog Entries
    7
    I think you're in safe hands with the Seidensticker translation. I haven't read his Genji, but I did read his Snow Country, and that was fantastic.

  8. #1658
    University student EvoWarrior5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    126
    Stopped by the book store to find a gift for my mom's birthday when I saw Nineteen Eighty-Four. I have heard about it so I decided to buy it to start reading soon.
    Without any form of punctuation, our language would not say "I'm perfect"; it would say "imperfect".

    "Access to works of art cannot be defined solely in terms of physical accessibility, since works of art exist only for those who have the means of understanding them."

  9. #1659
    tea-timing book queen bouquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    France
    Posts
    1,772
    The Wings of the Dove (Henry James)




    _______________
    Currently reading: Max Havelaar (Multatuli)
    "He lives most gaily who knows best how to deceive himself. Ha-ha!"
    - CRIME AND PUNISHMENT
    (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)

  10. #1660
    Casual Olympian Buckthorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Lancashire
    Posts
    390
    The Snowman (Christmas present for a friends little boy)

  11. #1661
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    344
    READING-An Essay by Hugh Walpole, a small and quaint old hardcover book from 1927, about, well, reading; the book is not about reading criticism though, rather, the joy of reading.

  12. #1662
    tea-timing book queen bouquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    France
    Posts
    1,772
    Hawksmoor (Peter Ackroyd)
    On the Black Hill (Bruce Chatwin)
    Slow Man (J.M. Coetzee)
    Foucault's Pendulum (Umberto Eco)
    Burmese Days (George Orwell)
    La Leçon d'Allemand (Siegfried Lenz)
    Melmoth the Wanderer (Charles Maturin)
    Like Life (Lorrie Moore)
    Them (Joyce Carol Oates)
    "He lives most gaily who knows best how to deceive himself. Ha-ha!"
    - CRIME AND PUNISHMENT
    (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)

  13. #1663
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Hard to tell, whatever book I am reading , I am there.
    Posts
    8
    I just bought Kafka The Trial
    Why?
    It's simply I have heard so much about him that I wanted to read his work. And The Trial caught my eyes.
    Visit my blog for Inspiration and Literature. http://ronaldhadrian.org

  14. #1664
    Snowqueen Snowqueen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Between the woods and frozen lake
    Posts
    2,523
    I’ve bought a couple of books yesterday, Madame Bovary and Tender is the Night, looking forward to read both.

  15. #1665
    tea-timing book queen bouquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    France
    Posts
    1,772
    The Best American Short Stories (Tobias Wolff, ed.)
    Parade's End (Ford Madox Ford)
    Platform (Michel Houellebecq)
    March (Geraldine Brooks)
    The Debriefing (Robert Littell)
    Gargantua & Pantagruel (François Rabelais)
    Mémoires d'Hadrien (Marguerite Yourcenar)
    Classic English Short Stories (Derek Hudson, ed.)
    How to Raise a Gentleman (Kay West)
    Waterland (Graham Swift)
    The Magus (John Fowles)
    "He lives most gaily who knows best how to deceive himself. Ha-ha!"
    - CRIME AND PUNISHMENT
    (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •