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Thread: Last Book You Bought and Why

  1. #991
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
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    The Octopus by Frank Norris, because I am interested in the influence of French naturalist literature on its American counterpart. I have recently finished McTeague by the same author ( fourth reading ) and it's my contention that anyone who claims to be fully up on American writing and hasn't read Norris, is deluding themselves.

  2. #992
    Something's Gone hoope's Avatar
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    The Hobbit by JRR Tolkein.. i loved Lord of the Rings and i am a great fan of the Hobbits
    i love Fiction , adventure books.. so i think readin it is wonderful...
    am in the mid of the book & i can't stop readin it :-)
    "He is asleep. Though his mettle was sorely tried,
    He lived, and when he lost his angel, died.
    It happened calmly, on its own,
    The way the night comes when day is done."



  3. #993
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    Thumbs up

    Ensaios radioativos, by Marcio-Andre.

    He was a colleague, at school (university). We became friends. I like him, as a ... business man (him).

    The book looks like interesting, by the way. I intend to read it on my hollidays, next month. I myself wrote some essays, some time ago, enough to compose two books, and sent to him, so as to know what he thought about, and until now he wishes to publish me, but neither he nor I have the money. He has enough "courage" to sell his own stuff. I don't intend to live of this.

    I liked to buy his last two books, this one, and another one, intitled Intradoxos.

    "Ensaios radioativos" mean "Radioactive essays". I might translate it into English, if he agreed ... I'll talk about it with him.


    So ...


    librarius

  4. #994
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    "Ma i'm gettin meself a new mammy" by Martha Long.
    I bought it for my mam because she loved her first book, "Ma, he sold me for a few cigerettes". I mean to read them too.
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
    Artemins Fowl and the Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer


    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

  5. #995
    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epistemophile View Post
    'Of Grammatology' by Derrida trans. by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak because it came in cheap and because it's worth keeping in the collection: even if i don't read it now at one go, i'll definitely go back to it innumerable times in the future.
    I have gone through Derrida several times and I could not comprehend the book for it is pretty hard to understand. Derrida is too hard like James Joyce. Most of us keep collections of such books but we hardly read and even if we read we can not complete.

    We know they are great books and such books are recommended in our texts in colleges but we can not find them appealing except for the fact that we do read since we have so many referrals for reading such classics.

    In my college I read Shakespeare and Milton, and of course some passages were interesting but some are very tough for me, and I read just for the sake of reading not for enjoyments.

    So most classics fail as sources of enjoyments and there are a few books that can entertain and enlighten us.

    I have been reading the Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid by a great Management Guru. This book is wonderful and writes about reaching out to the poor and encourage entrepreneurs, regulators and non government organizations to reach out to the poor and take the poor as not burdens but potential consumers and at the same time the book encourages to involve the poor in entrepreneurial skills and they can turn out to be capable individuals adding value the way capitalists do.

    This is really a must-read book by C.K. Prahalad.

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

  6. #996
    Internal nebulae TheFifthElement's Avatar
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    Revenge of the Lawn
    In Watermelon Sugar
    Abortion: A Love Story
    Trout Fishing in America

    All by Richard Brautigan (gone a bit mad!)
    Want to know what I think about books? Check out https://biisbooks.wordpress.com/

  7. #997
    Mad Hatter Mark F.'s Avatar
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    Revenge of the Lawn and Trout Fishing in America are great.

    Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry, cause I saw the John Huston film starring Albert Finney and felt like reading the novel.

    South of No North by Bukowski, I need my monthly dose.
    "And the worms, they will climb
    The rugged ladder of your spine"

  8. #998
    dum spiro, spero Nossa's Avatar
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    Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder. I didn't really buy it, it was a gift from my cousin I'm currently reading it, and I love it!
    I'm the patron saint of the denial,
    With an angel face and a taste for suicidal.

  9. #999
    Registered User Saladin's Avatar
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    Last two books i bought:

    Faust - Goethe
    The Sorrows of Young Werther - Goethe

  10. #1000
    Love replaces fear Kloster's Avatar
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    Milan Kundera's Laughable Loves. Been looking for it for a long time, 'til today I found this pocket-book edition and well, I just took the chance.
    Jeff Buckley. I bought every CD and then felt very superior to everyone else. It's perfectly rational for me to stay up all night just in case he comes on TV.

  11. #1001
    Registered User Tallon's Avatar
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    Gravity's Rainbow By Thomas Pynchon

    I've just finished V and loved it. I was browsing in a secondhand bookshop and it caught my eye, plus it is a much lauded novel.

  12. #1002
    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    Feild Work by Seamus Heaney
    Why? because i Love Seamus Heaney

    God of Small Things By Arundhruti Roy
    Why? Forum Bookclub
    Last edited by Niamh; 11-08-2008 at 12:53 PM. Reason: spelling
    "Come away O human child!To the waters of the wild, With a faery hand in hand, For the worlds more full of weeping than you can understand."
    W.B.Yeats

    "If it looks like a Dwarf and smells like a Dwarf, then it's probably a Dwarf (or a latrine wearing dungarees)"
    Artemins Fowl and the Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer


    my poems-please comment Forum Rules

  13. #1003
    Alive In Our Hearts mercy_mankind's Avatar
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    The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and i'm reading it.

  14. #1004
    Internal nebulae TheFifthElement's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercy_mankind View Post
    The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and i'm reading it.
    Freaky! I just bought the Collected Works of Hawthorne which includes The Scarlet Letter. I had no interest in Hawthorne until I read The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster but now I'm very intrigued. I'd be interested to know what you think of The Scarlet Letter.
    Want to know what I think about books? Check out https://biisbooks.wordpress.com/

  15. #1005
    Alive In Our Hearts mercy_mankind's Avatar
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    Well, I had no interest in Hawthorne too until reading a part of the scarlet letter.It is very interesting, I'm sure you will like it.It's about morality and ethics, it addressed spiritual and moral issues of course from a uniquely American standpoint. The scarlet letter represents the height of Hawthorne's literary genius, dense with terse descriptions and it has a philosophical&psychological depth make it remains.

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