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Thread: Last Book You Bought and Why

  1. #1771
    Bohemian Marbles's Avatar
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    Pride and Prejudice.

    It came out in a beautiful new edition, in sharp jet black font on thick milk-white paper. Deluxe or not. dunno. But not the sort of junk that's published these days in dull ink and pirated-looking tawny paper for environmental concerns.

    Just bought it, just like that, 'cause it looked so cool. Probably will gift it to my sister who is lately getting into Jane Austen.
    But you, cloudless girl, question of smoke, corn tassel
    You were what the wind was making with illuminated leaves.
    ah, I can say nothing! You were made of everything.

    _Pablo Neruda

  2. #1772
    tea-timing book queen bouquin's Avatar
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    I, Robot (Isaac Asimov)
    After the Quake (Haruki Murakami)
    Mister Pip (Lloyd Jones)
    Let the Great World Spin (Colum McCann)
    The Heather Blazing (Colm Toibin)
    The Ogre (Michel Tournier)

    . . . because they seem like good books to read.




    ____________________
    Currently reading: Crime and Punishment (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)
    "He lives most gaily who knows best how to deceive himself. Ha-ha!"
    - CRIME AND PUNISHMENT
    (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)

  3. #1773
    tea-timing book queen bouquin's Avatar
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    The Shining (Stephen King)




    _______________
    Currently reading: A Town Like Alice (Nevil Shute)
    "He lives most gaily who knows best how to deceive himself. Ha-ha!"
    - CRIME AND PUNISHMENT
    (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)

  4. #1774
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    Lelia: The Life of George Sand by André Maurois (in an antique bookshop)

    Because I am a bit fascinated by this French writer's life. She was so ahead of her time and her love affairs were like in today's Hollywood.

  5. #1775
    Registered User bounty's Avatar
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    the fault in our stars because I recently saw the movie and I absolutely loved it!

  6. #1776
    tea-timing book queen bouquin's Avatar
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    Troubles (J. G. Farrell)
    The Siege of Krishnapur (J. G. Farrell)
    Dispatches (Michael Herr)
    Come Back, Dr. Caligari (Donald Barthelme)
    Love's Work (Gillian Rose)




    _______________
    Currently reading: Tropic of Cancer (Henry Miller)
    "He lives most gaily who knows best how to deceive himself. Ha-ha!"
    - CRIME AND PUNISHMENT
    (Fyodor Dostoyevsky)

  7. #1777
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    Quote Originally Posted by madSimonJ View Post
    1001 Nights (Malcom Lyons Translation)
    I'm reading this. It's great! Might take three years though...

  8. #1778
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    I bought The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis last night... and had it signed by her! She gave a reading and answered questions. Her demeanor was pretty much what you would expect from her writings, calm and patient but also not without wit.

  9. #1779
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    William Shakespeare "All's Well That Ends Well". While not technically a storybook, it has pages and a spine with words printed on the paper. I use to own The Complete Works Of William Shakespeare but I find that single editions are on the convenient side.

  10. #1780
    Left 4evr Adolescent09's Avatar
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    The most recent tome I have integrated into my copious arsenal of tomes is the hallowed text of the inscrutable Sir Charles Dickens. It is dubbed Bleak House and it is an impeccable account of the flagrant shortcomings and injustices of the 19th century legal system embodied in the drab, droll, dubious, callous, nefarious and nebulous Court of Chancery. A 'cheerio to all ye fine mateys and lassies interring your heads in the tomes of the times. Mighty fine read here ye' mateys of the linguistic seas!

    No, but seriously Bleak House is not my favorite work from Dickens but its still a pretty good read. Nearly finished with it, too!
    My hide hides the heart inside

  11. #1781
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    Few days back, I decided to go back and read the plays of William Shakespeare. I have read almost all of them except for “The Tempest” but i have gone through few readers blog to get an idea. Considered to be his last play, Tempest is a story of revenge and succession of good over evil and wicked. Prospero is an interesting character and had actually handed over much of the running of the state to his brother in the past when he was pursuing the magic and obscure. With the powers he learned, he somehow conquered the services of a powerful spirit, Ariel, and restricted a near-monster critter, Caliban. The Tempest is one of his brilliant works.. I believe that most of you have read this book, if you haven't, then don't hesitate to read it because it is certainly worth reading.

  12. #1782
    rat in a strange garret Whifflingpin's Avatar
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    "The Final Adventures of the Robber Hotzenplotz" by Otfried Preussler; because I've given my son his copy back to read to his children and I needed a copy to read to my other grandchildren.
    Voices mysterious far and near,
    Sound of the wind and sound of the sea,
    Are calling and whispering in my ear,
    Whifflingpin! Why stayest thou here?

  13. #1783
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    'The Selected Letters of Charles Dickens.' Because I can't afford to be without it. I saw it and I said I must have it, and so I bought it.

  14. #1784
    Eiseabhal
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    I buy books in lumps. Site Works , The Retreat: Hitlers First Defeat, The Miniaturist, Cuimhneachan, A Clash of Kings (not for myself that last) That's the most recent lump. An army pension and good cattle prices mean that I have cash to spare.

  15. #1785
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    Ah hah but not as good a pension as our friend SM Barney Macaskill of Glenelg whose cattle you've been buying this year! I myself have a copy of Cuimhneachan and think it is a work of tremendous dedication. The Miniaturist? Never 'eard of it. I was in one of our local charity shops recently and got several items including When We Were Orphans, The Guga Hunters, Tobermory Tales and The Last Empire.

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