Page 5 of 23 FirstFirst 1234567891015 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 341

Thread: Is English A Difficult Language?

  1. #61
    Registered User Goodfella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Always rounded by walls
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by Sweet-Annie View Post
    muhsin: I think I didn't make myself clear on that one. Itís really hard to put in words a definition for that (if you don't know Spanish). So let me give you a definition I found on the internet.

    "In most varieties of Spanish, there are two singular forms of the second person pronoun: Usted and tķ. The former is a formal pronoun, used for social superiors and new acquaintances. The latter is familiar. 'Tutear' is a verb meaning 'to address someone as "tķ"'. However, the meaning isn't purely linguistic: It indicates familiarity. Thus, 'Puedes tutearme' (You can address me as "tķ"') is an invitation to familiarity. The connotation is similar to the English phrase 'to be on a first name basis with', but I can't think, off-hand, of an English term or phrase that describes personal relationships through linguistic usage in the same way."
    Your language (Spanish, eh?) it works just like my language.

  2. #62
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Goodfella View Post
    Its indicated below your user name that you're a new member. But, you need not to specify who you like to answer your question. Even the native speaker himself won't like know this answer.
    I know I donít have to, but I just want to find out how things seem from their perspective. To me, itís all the same if someone says, for instance, aubergine or eggplant, but to native speakers one of these two might sound strange. Or not. So thatís why Iím asking. Are those differencies important in real-life situations? Or when a dictionary says AmE it means the word is used MAINLY in AmE, but thereís no problem I use it in BrE? You've already answered this, but I'd also like to see what other people think...

  3. #63
    Registered User Goodfella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Always rounded by walls
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by AliasX View Post
    I know I donít have to, but I just want to find out how things seem from their perspective. To me, itís all the same if someone says, for instance, aubergine or eggplant, but to native speakers one of these two might sound strange. Or not. So thatís why Iím asking. Are those differencies important in real-life situations? Or when a dictionary says AmE it means the word is used MAINLY in AmE, but thereís no problem I use it in BrE? You've already answered this, but I'd also like to see what other people think...

    Okay. I now fathom what you were saying.I hope English natives will offer this help very anon.

  4. #64
    Registered User muhsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Jalandhar, India
    Posts
    1,185
    Blog Entries
    4

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by AliasX View Post
    I know I donít have to, but I just want to find out how things seem from their perspective. To me, itís all the same if someone says, for instance, aubergine or eggplant, but to native speakers one of these two might sound strange. Or not. So thatís why Iím asking. Are those differencies important in real-life situations? Or when a dictionary says AmE it means the word is used MAINLY in AmE, but thereís no problem I use it in BrE? You've already answered this, but I'd also like to see what other people think...

    Somebody here needs your response natives speakers of English! Where are you?
    The source of any bad writing is the desire to be something more than a person of sense--the straining to be thought a genius. If people would say what they have to say in plain terms, how much eloquent they would be.
    -S.T COLERIDGE

  5. #65
    shortstuff higley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    560
    Blog Entries
    18
    It can go either way. Sometimes a word is used mainly in American English or British English but can be understood in either, and sometimes it's specific just to one or the other. It really depends. In some cases the terms AmE or BrE refer to slang, which really wouldn't be understood by anyone outside the region it originated in, unless the slang spread in popularity.

    In real life, speaking BrE to an American might bring a small bit of confusion, but that's easily corrected, I think.
    '...A cast of your skull, sir, until the original is available, would be an ornament to any anthropological museum. It is not my intention to be fulsome, but I confess that I covet your skull.' --Dr. Mortimer, The Hound of the Baskervilles

  6. #66
    Registered User Goodfella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Always rounded by walls
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by Goodfella View Post
    Its indicated below your user name that you're a new member. But, you need not to specify who you like to answer your question. Even the native speaker himself won't like know this answer.
    To me (a person with infant-like English) it certainly will sound differ but well understood. More expecially that nowadays, AmE is widely spoken even in Great Britain eg in BBC programs etc. Isn't it my people?
    Quote Originally Posted by higley View Post
    It can go either way. Sometimes a word is used mainly in American English or British English but can be understood in either, and sometimes it's specific just to one or the other. It really depends. In some cases the terms AmE or BrE refer to slang, which really wouldn't be understood by anyone outside the region it originated in, unless the slang spread in popularity.

    In real life, speaking BrE to an American might bring a small bit of confusion, but that's easily corrected, I think.
    I thank God that my forgoing thought is along the line as above reply made by higley manifest.

  7. #67
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by higley View Post
    In real life, speaking BrE to an American might bring a small bit of confusion, but that's easily corrected, I think.
    Thatís all I wanted to know, thanks

  8. #68
    Dutch Devil Dorian Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    The Republic of Ireland
    Posts
    83
    English is a very easy language to learn I think. I thought German, French and Spanish was more difficult.

    (I'm a student English teacher)

  9. #69
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    71
    English seems a very easy language in the beginning, as we are "bombardised" by it as the majority of the films, songs and everything it is in English so we are getting used to it.
    But in a higher lever of speach English isnt such an easy language. For me Italian, Spanish and generally the languages that are based on latin are much more easy to learn.

    Evi

  10. #70
    Dutch Devil Dorian Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    The Republic of Ireland
    Posts
    83
    Quote Originally Posted by Evi View Post
    For me Italian, Spanish and generally the languages that are based on latin are much more easy to learn.
    Spanish and Italian are so similar. My mom lived in Italy for a year and spoke only Spanish when she moved there. She picked up Italian rather easily.

    I only took Spanish for a year (French too) at secondary school and I'd love to take some courses sometime. I'm considering language travel.

  11. #71
    Registered User muhsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Jalandhar, India
    Posts
    1,185
    Blog Entries
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorian Gray View Post
    English is a very easy language to learn I think. I thought German, French and Spanish was more difficult.

    (I'm a student English teacher)
    You said that because (maybe) you are not expose in learning other languages you enumerated. I don't quiet mean its (English) difficult rather, from what others said about other languages I learnt that.
    The source of any bad writing is the desire to be something more than a person of sense--the straining to be thought a genius. If people would say what they have to say in plain terms, how much eloquent they would be.
    -S.T COLERIDGE

  12. #72
    Registered User muhsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Jalandhar, India
    Posts
    1,185
    Blog Entries
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorian Gray View Post
    Spanish and Italian are so similar. My mom lived in Italy for a year and spoke only Spanish when she moved there. She picked up Italian rather easily.

    I only took Spanish for a year (French too) at secondary school and I'd love to take some courses sometime. I'm considering language travel.
    Great dear. How many languages can you now speak and write. It sounds you can speak many. I wish I could do such.
    The source of any bad writing is the desire to be something more than a person of sense--the straining to be thought a genius. If people would say what they have to say in plain terms, how much eloquent they would be.
    -S.T COLERIDGE

  13. #73
    Registered User muhsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Jalandhar, India
    Posts
    1,185
    Blog Entries
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Evi View Post
    English seems a very easy language in the beginning, as we are "bombardised" by it as the majority of the films, songs and everything it is in English so we are getting used to it.
    But in a higher lever of speach English isnt such an easy language. For me Italian, Spanish and generally the languages that are based on latin are much more easy to learn.

    Evi

    I am very delighted having your contribution in this thread.
    Pls. don't ask me for the reason.
    The source of any bad writing is the desire to be something more than a person of sense--the straining to be thought a genius. If people would say what they have to say in plain terms, how much eloquent they would be.
    -S.T COLERIDGE

  14. #74
    Registered User Goodfella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Always rounded by walls
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by muhsin View Post
    I am very delighted having your contribution in this thread.
    Pls. don't ask me for the reason.
    Don't ask for reply? Right?

  15. #75
    Wandering Child Annamariah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    1,397
    I've studied two languages at school, English and Swedish. I think English is a lot easier than Swedish, but maybe it's just because I've heard English much more than Swedish. Music, movies, tv-series, advertisements - you can't possibly avoid English in Finland, and that makes learning it much easier than learning other languages.
    Little Lotte thought of everything and nothing. Her hair was golden as the sun's rays and her soul as clear and blue as her eyes.
    Gaston Leroux - The Phantom of the Opera

Page 5 of 23 FirstFirst 1234567891015 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Is English your first language?
    By Logos in forum Introductions
    Replies: 500
    Last Post: 05-14-2010, 12:12 PM
  2. Let's Throw Grammar Into The Garbage!
    By WolfLarsen in forum General Writing
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 07-07-2006, 05:54 PM
  3. Protecting the Diversity of Languages
    By kulturo in forum General Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-29-2005, 05:58 PM
  4. Questions re: English Language
    By Sitaram in forum General Chat
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-03-2005, 09:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •