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Thread: Book Reccomendadtions for a seventh grade class?

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    The Invincible Verbatim's Avatar
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    Book Reccomendadtions for a seventh grade class?

    i am supposed to be starting as a student teacher on monday of next week, and i am trying to think of appropraite subject matter for 12-13 year olds. including 2 essays and 3 books. so far i was thinking of...

    Ender's Game
    by. Orsen Scott Card.

    The Barn
    Avi.


    Bud, not Buddy
    Christopher Paul Curtis.

    The Giver
    Lois Lowry


    but, as i was reading Ender's game for the thousandth time, i relized it may be a bit too mature for them. but it contains so many good crunchy tidbits that i think they'll just eat right up. (the others are great books, but easy enough for them to read and not get frustrated) but their teacher DID say that they were incredably bright students, but then again, what teacher won't?
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    I've taught both "The Pearl" and "Sounder" to that age group, both top rate.

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    dreamer genoveva's Avatar
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    What about Speak or Holes?
    "I have so often dreamed of you that you become unreal." ~ Robert Desnos

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    Teller of Tales SummerSolstice's Avatar
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    Jerry Spinelli is always a winner. Although I'm a bit too fond of his work to have a really objective idea of what's good for what age group, I think "Wringer" is just about in that box.

    Ender's Game? I dunno... I read that for the first time a year ago (I'm 18, three months from being 19) and it was pretty freakin' intense for me... I try my best not to underestimate kids (the primary sin for a kids writer!) but it might be a stretch for a 7th grader. But hey, that's the age group for some of my own favorite books, so like I said, not sure I'm objective enough. ^_^
    The world is dark, and light is precious.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verbatim View Post
    i am supposed to be starting as a student teacher on monday of next week, and i am trying to think of appropraite subject matter for 12-13 year olds. including 2 essays and 3 books. so far i was thinking of...

    Ender's Game
    by. Orsen Scott Card.

    The Barn
    Avi.


    Bud, not Buddy
    Christopher Paul Curtis.

    The Giver
    Lois Lowry


    but, as i was reading Ender's game for the thousandth time, i relized it may be a bit too mature for them. but it contains so many good crunchy tidbits that i think they'll just eat right up. (the others are great books, but easy enough for them to read and not get frustrated) but their teacher DID say that they were incredably bright students, but then again, what teacher won't?
    with all due respect, those books you listed are all pop culture garbage being pawned off as cutting edge reading for middle schoolers. that giver book is especially a joke. i recommend you stick to the classics.
    "He was nauseous with regret when he saw her face again, and when, as of yore, he pleaded and begged at her knees for the joy of her being. She understood Neal; she stroked his hair; she knew he was mad."
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    Teller of Tales SummerSolstice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon1jt View Post
    with all due respect, those books you listed are all pop culture garbage being pawned off as cutting edge reading for middle schoolers. that giver book is especially a joke. i recommend you stick to the classics.
    Now, what makes you say that? Because you've read each of them with an open mind and an ability to truly enjoy a book written for those younger than you (I've had to come to grips with the fact it's not something everyone can do)? Or maybe because they were written in the late 20th century? Every classic was "cutting-edge" at some point--even though I dislike that phrase and can seldom think of a positive application for it.

    Perhaps I can understand your reasoning better if you name some of the classics you're talking about. To tell the truth, I'm drawing a blank... isn't young adult literature kind of a newer deal? I mean, coming-of-age novels have been around since novels themselves, but these days many of the old ones of that type fall under "adult" lit.
    The world is dark, and light is precious.
    Come closer, dear reader.
    You must trust me.
    I am telling you a story.
    - The Tale of Despereaux

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    Ditsy Pixie Niamh's Avatar
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    personally i believe that many books for young adults and children have more thought put in them and can be even more enjoyable than books for adults. Just because you think those titles are beneath you does not mean they should not be thought to a 13 year old. can you even remember what you where thought? i bet you you do and i'm sure you enjoyed at least one of them.

    For the Junior Certificate exam in Ireland Eoin Colfers Artemis Fowl has been added to the curriculum. You might as well go for something thats popular today with kids than something like a classic. i mean their only thirteen, they might not get the language and some of the words in the books might go over their heads completely. When i was thirteen i studied the Hobbit, and goodnight mr Tom.

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    Quote Originally Posted by genoveva View Post
    What about Speak or Holes?
    Both are great. I especially like Holes. It works not only to teach the "tall tale," that kids that age might really like, but also figurative language, and the notion that sometimes 'fate' holds unexpected surprises for those who deserve it.

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    Where the Heart Is By Billie Letts


    I read this book about 2 years ago and loved it. Later my children told me it was one of the required reading books for some of the Lit classes at the High School.

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    Tuck Everlasting?

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    Thinking...thinking! dramasnot6's Avatar
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    in 7th grade we read The Outsiders, pretty good. But what i really enjoyed in 6th, and many of my friends enjoyed it in 7th and 8th too, was To Kill a Mockingbird. that makes for great discussions. What exactly are you looking for? More towards fantasy, historical, ...?

    Oh the Giver would definetly be a good one though, i really enjoyed that one. Youve got a good list there, I'm sure you will do fine! Good luck!
    I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.


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    I suppose it would depend on what you want the students to get out of the book. When I was that age we read a collection of short stories called The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner. It is a bit dated (first published in 1959) and uses some colloquiallisms that your students may not be familiar with, but the stories themselves are reasonably enjoyable. Also it provides the opportunity for the students to practice determining meaning of words from context.
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    Joanna F.Emerald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lavendar1 View Post
    I especially like Holes. It works not only to teach the "tall tale," that kids that age might really like, but also figurative language, and the notion that sometimes 'fate' holds unexpected surprises for those who deserve it.
    Yep, you can't go wrong with Holes. And also Lord of the Flies, if that's appropriate.
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    Thinking...thinking! dramasnot6's Avatar
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    Oh,i agree. Loved Loved Loved Holes.
    I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.


    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

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    Well, I'm trying to remember what I read back than, I know I read and enjoyed War of the Worlds in grade 6 or 7. Hmm, most of those mentioned I'm unfamiliar with though (heard of them, never have and probably never will read).
    "Americans should know the universe itself as a road, as many roads, as roads for traveling souls."
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