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Thread: d.h.lawrence

  1. #1
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    d.h.lawrence

    did somebody read mornings in mexico.
    I'm reading it, but i didn't understand the first chapter, the one on corasmin and the parrots.
    my questions:
    lawrence underline the colours of the parrots and the dog eyes , He repeats that both have yellow eyes.
    does this have a meaning?
    and he writes about the sun and shadow,
    what does he want to symbolize or express with the sun and shadow
    for the text go on the site

    http://www.ereader.com/product/book/...ings_in_Mexico


    thank you.

  2. #2
    Our wee Olympic swimmer Janine's Avatar
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    Hi, I just joined this forum. I am interested in your question, since I recently read "The Lost Girl" and Lawrence describes her love interest as having yellow eyes. He does this often throughout the text so that it is definitely a prominent idea to him. I did not know if he was just perceiving the man's eyes this way, as with flecks of light and maybe being an unusual light brown in color, but I doubted it ended there and sensed that it had much more meaning. It was interesting to me to hear of the parrot's and dog's eyes being described as "yellow". His work is always vividly painted with colored images and I have read somewhere on the web recently - perhaps from Freida, his wife - that Lawrence saw more colors in the spectrum than the average person could perceive. I just completed reading his first printed novel "The White Peacock", which brought this thought to mind, since it is certainly a vividly colored novel with a heightened sense of his acknowledgement of the natural world. He paints a most exquisite picture with words, sometimes giving them human or animal qualities. Below the surface is much hidden meaning and mystery...the writings are very intricate and profound even within description. This heightened sensitivity of his to the colors of his world and his wonderful sensitivity to all that was around him make me recall the quote of Frieda's(?). He certainly was a person awake in all aspects! I too, would like to know the significance of the yellow eyes. Perhaps he saw them as "light" and Lawrence's work is always about light and darkness. I hope this gives you some ideas on the subject you have presented.

  3. #3
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    You know, I have read a lot of D.H. Lawrence and did my master's thesis on him, but I have never come across this yellow eyes image. I have not read The Lost Girl. If I have Mornings in Mexico (I've lost rrack of what I have) I will look for the context of th yellow eyes. I would be interested in other people's thought as well.
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    "Love follows knowledge." St. Catherine of Siena

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    Well I checked my Lawrence books. I don't own either Mornings In Mexico or The Lost Girl. So I'm going to take a guess here for you franky. The yellow eyes may be a means of separating the animals from the humans. No human has yellow eyes as far as know. The animals see the world differently than humans, and the eyes are symbolic for that. Again, this is a guess.
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    "Love follows knowledge." St. Catherine of Siena

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Our wee Olympic swimmer Janine's Avatar
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    Yellow Eyes

    I think you may have something there about animal versa human. The male love interest in the "Lost Girl" seems to have strange yellow eyes (at least as perceived by the woman (the lost girl) and is mentioned and described often throughout the book. They also seem to evoke light and then darkness - a combination of the two in one. It does seem as though his allure is a sort of animal magnetisum to her. He is of the lower classes - part of a traveling troupe or theatrical group. He is the counterpart to the gamekeeper in "Lady Chatterly's Lover" or "George in "The White Peacock"....common yet alluring and earthy.

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