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Thread: Sir Walter Scott?

  1. #1
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    Question Sir Walter Scott?

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    Who wrote the lines "Breathes there the man whose soul so dead"?
    What is the full text of the poem?

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    The quote is from "The Lay of the Last Minstrel" and actually reads: "Breathes there a man with soul so dead, who never to himself hath said "this is my own, my native land."

  3. #3
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
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    It is a very long poem.

    The first two stanzas of Canto 6 begin

    Breathes there the man, with soul so dead,
    Who never to himself hath said,
    This is my own, my native land!
    Whose heart hath ne'er within him burn'd,
    As home his footsteps he hath turn'd,
    From wandering on a foreign strand!
    If such there breathe, go, mark him well;
    For him no Minstrel raptures swell;
    High though his titles, proud his name,
    Boundless his wealth as wish can claim;
    Despite those titles, power, and pelf,
    The wretch, concentred all in self,
    Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
    And, doubly dying, shall go down
    To the vile dust, from whence he sprung,
    Unwept, unhonor'd, and unsung.
    II
    O Caledonia! stern and wild,
    Meet nurse for a poetic child!
    Land of brown heath and shaggy wood,
    Land of the mountain and the flood,
    Land of my sires! what mortal hand
    Can e'er untie the filial band,
    That knits me to thy rugged strand!
    Still as I view each well-known scene,
    Think what is now, and what hath been,
    Seems as, to me, of all bereft,
    Sole friends thy woods and streams were left;
    And thus I love them better still,
    Even in extremity of ill.
    By Yarrow's stream still let me stray,
    Though none should guide my feeble way;
    Still feel the breeze down Ettrick break,
    Although it chill my wither'd cheek:
    Still lay my head by Teviot Stone,
    Though there, forgotten and alone,
    The Bard may draw his parting groan.
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

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