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Thread: Tickets, please by D.H.Lawrence

  1. #1

    Tickets, please by D.H.Lawrence

    Hi everyone,
    I have read D.H.Lawrance's Tickets, please but I quite don't undertand it.
    Could you help me?
    plz make sure that I understand it...
    the story is about the man who have many girlfriend...finally all revenge.?
    what's ticket?

    thank you,

  2. #2
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    Any excuse for me to read D.H. Lawrence is a pleasure. I know I've read that story but I don't remember it. I will read it later today and post something on it tonight. If you can wait, hang tight and come back.
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    Books are embalmed minds.

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    OK I read and enjoyed it. I love reading D.H. Lawrence. First, it is a story of revenge. The impudent "****-of-the-walk" (and each word there is relevant) who seduces all the girls, gets beaten up by those girls at the end. The story is actually quite humorous: he flirts with each girl, plays with their hearts, and then gets trapped, physically beaten to where he's prostate and bleeding, and then he runs off with his tail between his legs. Lawrence subtly alludes in the story to a Greek tragedy (which I can't recall the name) where women are possessed by Dionysian passion and tear apart a man physically. But that's a minor thing. More importantly is the fact that the story is set during the war, WWI, and all the real men have gone off to war or have died in the war. What is left in England are "rash young men, a little crippled" and dandies like John Thomas and women, strong women who are now in some position of power. You must remember that Lawrence is the ultimate anti-feminist. He hated the war for what it did to society, kill good men. He hated the fact that the war inverted positions of power. He found it unnatural that women were running society and what is left of men are cripples and dandies. So this is a story with an element of satire, of inversions of power, and ultimately sterilty of society and of male/female relationships. I hope that helps.
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    Books are embalmed minds.

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    in angulo cum libro Petrarch's Love's Avatar
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    Lawrence subtly alludes in the story to a Greek tragedy (which I can't recall the name) where women are possessed by Dionysian passion and tear apart a man physically.
    Haven't read the D.H. Lawrence story--sounds interesting--but I wondered if the tragedy alluded to was the story of Orpheus, who was savagely dismembered by the Maenads--women who followed Bachus--because he shunned all women after losing Euridice. I think they tossed his head in the river later but I can't quite remember the significance of that...Milton alludes to it somewhere. Pretty dreadful.

    "In rime sparse il suono/ di quei sospiri ond' io nudriva 'l core/ in sul mio primo giovenile errore"~ Francesco Petrarca
    "Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can."~ Jane Austen

  5. #5
    his music great, drugs na chef's Avatar
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    i haven't read this what is it about?

  6. #6
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    Hi Petrarch. I looked it up. It's The Bacchae by Euripides, and it was Dionysious they tore apart, not Orpheus. Read about it here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bacchae
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    Books are embalmed minds.

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    rat in a strange garret Whifflingpin's Avatar
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    Er - Pentheus was torn apart, at the instigation of Dionysus.

    In other tales, Dionysus was torn apart just after birth, and reconstituted by his grandmother. (see Robert Graves' "The Greek Myths")

    And Petrarch's Love is correct in saying that Orpheus was also, according to the tales,
    torn apart by the Maenads, see http://www.pantheon.org/articles/o/orpheus.html

    .
    Voices mysterious far and near,
    Sound of the wind and sound of the sea,
    Are calling and whispering in my ear,
    Whifflingpin! Why stayest thou here?

  8. #8
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whifflingpin
    Er - Pentheus was torn apart, at the instigation of Dionysus.

    In other tales, Dionysus was torn apart just after birth, and reconstituted by his grandmother. (see Robert Graves' "The Greek Myths")

    And Petrarch's Love is correct in saying that Orpheus was also, according to the tales,
    torn apart by the Maenads, see http://www.pantheon.org/articles/o/orpheus.html

    .
    You're absolutely right. Now I remember. It was Pantheus in the Euripides play.
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    Books are embalmed minds.

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
    in angulo cum libro Petrarch's Love's Avatar
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    My, my those Maenads were certainly busy.

    "In rime sparse il suono/ di quei sospiri ond' io nudriva 'l core/ in sul mio primo giovenile errore"~ Francesco Petrarca
    "Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can."~ Jane Austen

  10. #10

    hello

    hello everyone, iam a new member. i will be taking literature this september for my access course to higher education. this will be my first literature class. iam 32, from the uk, though originally iam from africa. thank u all.

  11. #11
    Our wee Olympic swimmer Janine's Avatar
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    Hello everyone! Interesting story and good insights from everyone.

    Thanks pretty zinta for suggesting it. I know I read the story years ago and can't clearly recall it, but would definitely like to read it again after such interesting posts.

    Virgil, I wonder if we should not consider discussing it in full in the short story thread - maybe next month or sometime in the fall (?)
    "It's so mysterious, the land of tears."

    Chapter 7, The Little Prince ~ Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

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    Tickets, Please

    In answer to the original question, the guy is simply a conductor on a train who would call out 'Tickets, please' for inspection. Something that still goes on today on British transport.

    Lawrence's short stories are the best of anyone else's I have read. So vivid and memorable. Here's a man definitely in touch with his feminine side. I must put time aside to read more.

  13. #13
    Our wee Olympic swimmer Janine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sredni Vashtar View Post
    In answer to the original question, the guy is simply a conductor on a train who would call out 'Tickets, please' for inspection. Something that still goes on today on British transport.

    Lawrence's short stories are the best of anyone else's I have read. So vivid and memorable. Here's a man definitely in touch with his feminine side. I must put time aside to read more.
    Hi Sredni Vashtar, welcome to the forum and if you are inclined now to read more Lawrence short stories, please join in with the Lawrence Short Story thread. The participants quite agree with you that they are some of the finest short stories ever written. So far, in our discussion group, we have featured and discussed such gems as:

    Things
    The Horse-Dealer's Daughter
    The Prussian Officer
    The Shades of Spring
    The White Stocking (curently in discussion)

    We will choose the next story soon - perhaps "Tickets, Please" would be a good one. All of these stories can be found on this site; go to the main Lawrence page; much is offered there as well, including some of his finest novels and poetry. In the fall a few of us plan on reading "Sons and Lovers" and then later near the holiday season - "Lady Chatterly's Lover". Another thread is underway to address his 'Tortoise poems', and another yet to post various poems by the author. Being a very enthusiatic Lawrence fan, I have been in 'seventh heaven' lately. In past months some discussion has been actively taking place on two of Lawrence's novels - "Women in Love" -a stellar discussion group, I might add; and "Sons and Lovers". You can find both threads, if you put them into the top search (pull-down menu bar). Entering "Lawrence" will direct you to the discussions - you might have to go back a few pages, since the novels have become inactive recently and so have the Tortoise poems - short break on last and slow on the others - but threads go on forever, so feel free to add to them.

    Hope this has been informative and helpful to you and to the others in this thread as well.
    Last edited by Janine; 08-09-2007 at 04:33 PM.
    "It's so mysterious, the land of tears."

    Chapter 7, The Little Prince ~ Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

  14. #14
    that was grate from mr. virgil, but anyone here can tell me what lesson does john thomas learn in d. h. lawrence's "tickets, please..."
    thank you.

  15. #15
    Seeker of Knowledge
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    Comparing Short Stories!

    I am currently comparing Tickets, please by D.H. Lawrence and Here We Are by Dorthy Parker. Opinions on either would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance!

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