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Thread: Unofficial Words

  1. #1

    Unofficial Words

    There are a large number of great words that you never see in dictionaries (not even in the large, expensive ones; the ones with words between fuchsia and fucus). I used one today in another post and thought that this imbalance should be redressed. I invite anyone else that knows some welcome additions to the english language (that the likes of Oxford and Webster have sadly overlooked) to post them here.

    Here's a few to kick things off. I have limited myself to the more tasteful examples that I can think of!

    Bellywash (n) - cheap, low-alcohol beer.
    Brainfart (n) - a temporary mental aberration.
    Cribvirgin (n) - someone whose first post in a forum is an attempt to get someone else to write their essay / dissertation / course work.
    Elton (n) (vt) - the word in a song that you are singing along to that is completely different to the one you actually sang. To sing this word.
    Gamlin (n) - the act of getting one's partner's name wrong in bed.
    Klint (n) - the croaky tone of voice adopted when ringing into work sick.
    Ludlow (vi) - to speak very loudly on public transport whilst wearing headphones.
    Milton (n) - a person that still gets asked their age when buying alcohol, even though they are over 30.
    Phubb (n) - The sound of an obese person passing wind on a plastic chair.
    Quilson (n) - the state of somebody's hair immediately after removing a hat.
    Preantepenultimate (adj) - fourth from last.
    Vernon (n) - a person that comes and talks to you through the door at a party when you are in the bathroom being sick.
    Zankle (n) - the overwhelming desire to bite into a new bar of soap.

    Any further examples will be gratefully received.

  2. #2
    Springing Riesa's Avatar
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    lol
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    Xamonas, once again you astound me.
    Freeticulate(v)the above.
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  3. #3
    The Forgotten Muse water lily's Avatar
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    I love those dictionaries that give examples

    There were five brothers. But as the first three were very well adjusted and successful, naturally we will focus our attention on the last two (the preantepenultimate son, that is the second born, did have some qualities that were less than enviable, but the younger two easily outweighed him in all the important shortcomings:stupidity, a proneness to quilsons--and general all around unruly hair, the irrestible zankles that would seize them whenever they neared the Body Shop and the utter inability to execute convincing klints, which as we all know is contemptible even in the most worthy of human beings). The brothers' names were Milton and Vernon, now Milton was a Vernon, and Vernon, a Milton, which does complicate things. It was ill-plannning on the part of the parents, what can I say? Both brothers were apt to ludlow, which always secured them with the blackest of looks from many a set of narrowed eyes glaring above the ruffles of a newspaper. However, Milton and Vernon did in fact share one talent: they never-ever Eltoned: their voices being torturous to the ear, they had learned at an early age never to sing in public. Their parents often reflected that it would have been cheaper to have stopped at three.
    The End.
    "What is it all but a trouble of ants
    In the gleam of a million million of suns?"

  4. #4
    Registered User Anna Seis's Avatar
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    Hey! as an Anthropoetologist, (scientifist who studies the behaviour of poetical drunk animals at pubs and doubtful places) I am very impressed to discover here this precious material. Please send more .
    ... no person could be less liable than myself to be led away from the severe precincts of truth by the ignes fatui of superstition.
    Edgar Allan Poe
    Man doth not yield himself to the angels, nor unto death utterly, save only through the weakness of his feeble will.
    Joseph Glanvill

  5. #5

    unofficial words

    Quote Originally Posted by water lily
    There were five brothers. But as the first three were very well adjusted and successful, naturally we will focus our attention on the last two (the preantepenultimate son, that is the second born, did have some qualities that were less than enviable, but the younger two easily outweighed him in all the important shortcomings:stupidity, a proneness to quilsons--and general all around unruly hair, the irrestible zankles that would seize them whenever they neared the Body Shop and the utter inability to execute convincing klints, which as we all know is contemptible even in the most worthy of human beings). The brothers' names were Milton and Vernon, now Milton was a Vernon, and Vernon, a Milton, which does complicate things. It was ill-plannning on the part of the parents, what can I say? Both brothers were apt to ludlow, which always secured them with the blackest of looks from many a set of narrowed eyes glaring above the ruffles of a newspaper. However, Milton and Vernon did in fact share one talent: they never-ever Eltoned: their voices being torturous to the ear, they had learned at an early age never to sing in public. Their parents often reflected that it would have been cheaper to have stopped at three.
    The End.
    lol
    you have a great sense of humour. Must be all that ice time up north.
    "please sir can I have some more...of your writing?"

  6. #6
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    XC--you need a book called The Deeper Meaning of Liff by Douglass Adams (of Hitchhiker fame) and John Lloyd. Liff is itself a word that means "a word for something for which there should be a word but there isn't." It's halarious! All the words are names of real places, but the definitions-- thas diffo!

    Example:

    Elgin (adj) Thin and haggard as a result of strenuously trying to get healthy.

    Ely (n.) The first, tinnest inkling you get that something, somewhere, has gone terribly wrong...

    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

  7. #7
    Pen,

    I have seen this book (and admit to reading through most of it whilst standing in a bookshop, laughing out loud at times) but never got around to buying a copy. Thanks for reminding me.

    Most of my examples are from an 'alternate dictionary' compiled by a friend of mine over 50 years. It started as a compilation of Royal Navy slang, but grew into something larger. He is constantly adding to it as he hears people using bizarrre expressions. The exception to this is 'Cribvirgin' which I spotted being used on another forum and immediately adopted - it is such a good description.

  8. #8
    Suzerain of Cost&Caution SleepyWitch's Avatar
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    hey Xamonas, these words are hillarious is your friend's dictionary on the net?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by SleepyWitch
    hey Xamonas, these words are hillarious is your friend's dictionary on the net?
    Sadly not. And a lot of the other words would probably not fit the family orientation of this forum. I may post a few more of the slightly less distasteful soon.
    I was hoping that others would join in with their own though...

  10. #10
    Registered User Anna Seis's Avatar
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    I could to contribute with the transitive verb misjoplinize, that designs the action of unsuccesfully try to hang one's voice in the roof, when singing in a pub (and often eltonizing. We used to sing with a friend and he had no squalms about doing it)
    ... no person could be less liable than myself to be led away from the severe precincts of truth by the ignes fatui of superstition.
    Edgar Allan Poe
    Man doth not yield himself to the angels, nor unto death utterly, save only through the weakness of his feeble will.
    Joseph Glanvill

  11. #11
    Suzerain of Cost&Caution SleepyWitch's Avatar
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    hum... i've never made up any English words myself (my mother tongues is German )
    but my boyfriend came up with a compound that translates as "tutor-shirt" the other day...
    it refers to the fact that my prof likes to were funny-coloured shirts.. like orange or bright red ones (most of which don't suit him or don't match his trousers or don't match anyone's idea of what shirts should look like or what kind of clothes a prof should wear).. so a tutor-shirt would be any shirt that's got bright- colours and is totally out of sync with the wearer's social status.... the person who wears it doesn't need to be a tutor... e.g. if somebody is wearing a weird piece of clothing you can say "Ah, I see you're wearing your tutor-shirt today"...
    (the German word is "Dozentenhemd" for the benefit of any other Germans in here )
    not very creative, I know.....

  12. #12
    Kindly plush cthulhu beer good's Avatar
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    In connection with the James Frey controversy, I find myself coming back to the term "Poetic Lie-sense". Which I suppose can be defined as "the idea that when making sense of the world, a profound, though untrue, story can be more interesting and valuable than a true but banal one". Or as philosopher/theologian Giordano Bruno put it:
    Se non vero, molto ben trovato! (If it is not true, it is very well invented!)
    But the time ain't tall, yet on time you depend
    And no word is possessed by no special friend
    And though the line is cut it ain't quite the end,
    I'll just bid farewell till we meet again.
    - Bob Dylan

  13. #13
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
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    Don't know if you've heard this one or not, but the term is slobberknocker which means a no-holds-barred, knock-down, drag-out fight.
    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

  14. #14

    unofficial words

    Quote Originally Posted by Xamonas Chegwe
    There are a large number of great words that you never see in dictionaries (not even in the large, expensive ones; the ones with words between fuchsia and fucus). I used one today in another post and thought that this imbalance should be redressed. I invite anyone else that knows some welcome additions to the english language (that the likes of Oxford and Webster have sadly overlooked) to post them here.

    Here's a few to kick things off. I have limited myself to the more tasteful examples that I can think of!

    Bellywash (n) - cheap, low-alcohol beer.
    Brainfart (n) - a temporary mental aberration.
    Cribvirgin (n) - someone whose first post in a forum is an attempt to get someone else to write their essay / dissertation / course work.
    Elton (n) (vt) - the word in a song that you are singing along to that is completely different to the one you actually sang. To sing this word.
    Gamlin (n) - the act of getting one's partner's name wrong in bed.
    Klint (n) - the croaky tone of voice adopted when ringing into work sick.
    Ludlow (vi) - to speak very loudly on public transport whilst wearing headphones.
    Milton (n) - a person that still gets asked their age when buying alcohol, even though they are over 30.
    Phubb (n) - The sound of an obese person passing wind on a plastic chair.
    Quilson (n) - the state of somebody's hair immediately after removing a hat.
    Preantepenultimate (adj) - fourth from last.
    Vernon (n) - a person that comes and talks to you through the door at a party when you are in the bathroom being sick.
    Zankle (n) - the overwhelming desire to bite into a new bar of soap.

    Any further examples will be gratefully received.
    amazingly enough a female constable that works with battered women was talking to me on the telephone about three days ago and said the second on your list. I had only just read the list and was shocked to hear her say that word.Never heard it before!
    Last edited by rachel; 02-05-2006 at 12:01 PM. Reason: missed a letter

  15. #15
    Just another nerd RobinHood3000's Avatar
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    Yeah, it's all over the place -- anybody know the origin?
    "Now I did a job. I ain't got nothing but trouble since I did it, not to mention more than a few unkind words as regards to my character, so let me make this abundantly clear: I do the job. And then I get paid."

    - Capt. Malcolm Reynolds

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