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Thread: William Carlos Williams

  1. #1

    William Carlos Williams

    Please, please mr Admin can you add Williams Carlos Williams to the list of poets on this site?

    I just read some of his poetry and have to share my favorite so far with all of you:

    The Red Wheelbarrow, by William Carlos Williams

    so much depends
    upon

    a red wheel
    barrow

    glazed with rain
    water

    beside the white
    chickens.

    for more by Williams:
    http://www.poets.org/poems/poems.cfm?45442B7C000C07060177

    I´m looking for more poetry in this style. I´ve read Ginsberg, but I´ve read that Williams has inspired other american poets as well. I´m not that familiar with american poetry, so I´m thankful for any advice.
    "Man was made for joy and woe;
    And when this we rightly know
    Through the world we safely go" Blake

  2. #2
    You CAN go Home Again Sindhu's Avatar
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    The Red Wheelbarrow is one of my favourite Williams poems too. I think its really akin to Ezra Pound's "In a Station at the Metro"; one of the few Pound poms I really like. If you are interested in poetry in somewhat similar style to Williams you could check out Denise Levetrov.My favourite Levetrov poem is:The Secret
    Two girls discover
    the secret of life
    in a sudden line of
    poetry.

    I who don't know the
    secret wrote
    the line. They
    told me

    (through a third person)
    they had found it
    but not what it was
    not even

    what line it was. No doubt
    by now, more than a week
    later, they have forgotten
    the secret,

    the line, the name of
    the poem. I love them
    for finding what
    I can't find,

    and for loving me
    for the line I wrote,
    and for forgetting it
    so that

    a thousand times, till death
    finds them, they may
    discover it again, in other
    lines

    in other
    happenings. And for
    wanting to know it,
    for

    assuming there is
    such a secret, yes,
    for that
    most of all.

    Very relevant in its references to Pound, Williams and HD is
    September 1961
    This is the year the old ones,
    the old great ones
    leave us alone on the road.

    The road leads to the sea.
    We have the words in our pockets,
    obscure directions. The old ones

    have taken away the light of their presence,
    we see it moving away over a hill
    off to one side.

    They are not dying,
    they are withdrawn
    into a painful privacy

    learning to live without words.
    E. P. "It looks like dying"-Williams: "I can't
    describe to you what has been

    happening to me"-
    H. D. "unable to speak."
    The darkness

    twists itself in the wind, the stars
    are small, the horizon
    ringed with confused urban light-haze.

    They have told us
    the road leads to the sea,
    and given

    the language into our hands.
    We hear
    our footsteps each time a truck

    has dazzled past us and gone
    leaving us new silence.
    Ine can't reach

    the sea on this endless
    road to the sea unless
    one turns aside at the end, it seems,

    follows
    the owl that silently glides above it
    aslant, back and forth,

    and away into deep woods.

    But for usthe road
    unfurls itself, we count the
    words in our pockets, we wonder

    how it will be without them, we don't
    stop walking, we know
    there is far to go, sometimes

    we think the night wind carries
    a smell of the sea...

    One of her poms hich I think really shows william's influence is "Living While it May"

    The young elm that must be cut
    because its roots push at the house wall

    taps and scrapes my window
    urgently - but when I look round at it

    remains still

    You could also check out Robert Creely: "Water Music" is a good example
    The words are a beautiful music.
    The words bounce like in water.

    Water music,
    loud in the clearing

    off the boats,
    birds, leaves.

    They look for a place
    to sit and eat--

    no meaning,
    no point.

    Also Charles Olson and Cid Corman. My personal favourite is Levertov.
    Sorry for the VERY long post, I can only hope you'll find it interesting!
    I'm nobody, who are you?
    Are you nobody too?
    There's a pair of us, don't tell!
    They'd banish us, you know!

    How dreary to be somebody!

  3. #3
    Thank you! Thank you! What a treasure!
    I´ll get one of Levetrov´s books and maybe we can discuss her later?
    "Man was made for joy and woe;
    And when this we rightly know
    Through the world we safely go" Blake

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    Isagel, this is one of William Carlos William`s poems which i like, and i hope you will like it:

    (This Is Just To Say)

    I have eaten
    the plums
    that were in
    the icebox

    and which
    you were probably
    saving
    for breakfast

    Forgive me
    they were delicious
    so sweet
    and so cold
    To combat fear arm yourself with love. &
    To be yourself you must first let yourself be.

  5. #5
    You CAN go Home Again Sindhu's Avatar
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    Peeru, This is one of my favourites too!
    I'm nobody, who are you?
    Are you nobody too?
    There's a pair of us, don't tell!
    They'd banish us, you know!

    How dreary to be somebody!

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    oh how nice, we have something in common
    To combat fear arm yourself with love. &
    To be yourself you must first let yourself be.

  7. #7
    You CAN go Home Again Sindhu's Avatar
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    Another of my ABSOLUTE favourite Willims poems:
    Landscape with the Fall of Icarus
    According to Brueghel
    when Icarus fell
    it was spring

    a farmer was ploughing
    his field
    the whole pageantry

    of the year was
    awake tingling
    near

    the edge of the sea
    concerned
    with itself

    sweating in the sun
    that melted
    the wings' wax

    unsignificantly
    off the coast
    there was

    a splash quite unnoticed
    this was
    Icarus drowning

    What do you think, Peeru? And you Isagel?
    I'm nobody, who are you?
    Are you nobody too?
    There's a pair of us, don't tell!
    They'd banish us, you know!

    How dreary to be somebody!

  8. #8
    I like both the poem about Icarus, and This is just to say.

    This is just to say was the first poem I read from Williams, and it was my first experience with modern poetry, when I was 15. It made a strong impression. It turned evryday things into poetry, and they still look that way. I always wanted to be able to write like that.

    Have you seen the Breughel painting that Williams is referring to? His poem is a really interesting interpretation and description of it.

    Right now I´ve read "Asphodel that greeny flower" over and over again. It took some getting into, but now I love it. Here is a small part of it that I think Sindhu might like, and I hope Peeru will like it as well. It best read aloud.

    I cannot say
    that I have gone to hell
    for your love
    but often
    found myself there
    in your pursuit.
    I do not like it
    and wanted to be
    in heaven. Hear me out.
    Do not turn away.
    I have learned much in my life
    from books
    and out of them
    about love.
    Death
    is not the end of it.
    "Man was made for joy and woe;
    And when this we rightly know
    Through the world we safely go" Blake

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    Landscape shows the real style of William`s dont you agree sindhu?
    it`s obvious that William` is bounded to short stanzas, this is what i noticeed, still i like this poem.

    isagel, it is a nice poem really
    To combat fear arm yourself with love. &
    To be yourself you must first let yourself be.

  10. #10
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
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    I really like The Red Wheelbarrow and This Is Just To Say.

  11. #11
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
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    Thoughts on his poems?

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    Registered User /dev/null's Avatar
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    Can someone explain that "triadic line" nonsense to me?

  13. #13
    Thoughts on his poems?
    I think some of his poetry is pretty good, but I hate "The Red Wheelbarrow."
    “Yesterday's rose endures in its name, we hold empty names.”
    ― Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  14. #14
    You CAN go Home Again Sindhu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by /dev/null View Post
    Can someone explain that "triadic line" nonsense to me?
    I can't figure out where the 'triadic line' comes from though I went through the posts. Could you be more specific, please?
    I'm nobody, who are you?
    Are you nobody too?
    There's a pair of us, don't tell!
    They'd banish us, you know!

    How dreary to be somebody!

  15. #15
    You CAN go Home Again Sindhu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venerable Bede View Post
    I think some of his poetry is pretty good, but I hate "The Red Wheelbarrow."
    Well, to each his Own! I wonder if you like this poem by Frost? It always seems to have something in common with The Red Wheelbarrow' to me.

    The Secret Sits

    We dance round in a ring and suppose,
    But the Secret sits in the middle and knows.


    Robert Frost
    I'm nobody, who are you?
    Are you nobody too?
    There's a pair of us, don't tell!
    They'd banish us, you know!

    How dreary to be somebody!

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