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Thread: Russian literature

  1. #31
    Registered User caspian's Avatar
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    Russian literature is too realistic. I think that makes it so special. Not just literature, Russian culture in general is realistic: even a naked woman body or an erotic scene in Russian movie is quite different – I mean quite realistic -than what we get use to see in Hollywood production.
    Chehkov , Lermontov is my favorites. Nothing can be compared with Gogol's works.
    I gave up read Dostoyevsky at all after reading (actually I couldn’t finish it) one of his longest boring story. I’ve already listed “Master and Margerita” among my boring books.
    I advise to read Anatoly Ribakov and Valentin Rasputin.

  2. #32
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    I think Dostoyevky is very interesting, he describes the characters
    so well, he did know things in the human nature long before any
    scientist. He dives deep into the minds of the characters and
    describes their feelings and emotions on a hole new level.

    It's true, Russian literature is very realistic.Mostly there are no
    heroes, more the anti-hero.
    Everybody whant's to say something
    but only a few have something to say

  3. #33
    In libris libertas Aurora Ariel's Avatar
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    I plan to read Dostoyevsky before the end of the year, after receiving quite a few recommendations.Formerly, I had only read Tolstoy's War and Peace, and Anna Karenina.Has anyone read all of his works?
    Last edited by Aurora Ariel; 11-29-2005 at 03:59 PM.
    My own brain is to me the most unaccountable of machinery --always buzzing, humming, soaring, roaring, diving, and then buried in mud. And why? What's this passion for?
    -Virginia Woolf

    “I want to write a novel about Silence,” he said; “the things people don’t say. But the difficulty is immense.” He sighed. - Night and Day

  4. #34
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    Heavy, serious and emotional stuff. But I know a 2-yr. old adopted girl from the Motherland, and she is light as a feather, happy-go-lucky.

  5. #35
    Registered User BSturdy's Avatar
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    There are some extremely interesting opinions and suggestions here. (Note to self: read Bulgakov or Nabokov soon) .

    Woah, War and Peace needs to be read together with readers notes - a list of characters (and all their alternative names) and who they are - it's so confusing. I am still 'reading' it as I moved house, mid-read, and (hoped) thought I'd lost it. I will start again/continue though, as I remember really enjoying it. Soap opera? If only Eastenders was written by Tolstoy.

    Have read some Dostoevsky, very enjoyable, but find the important bits (the religious philosophy) a bit heavy going.

    I thoroughly recommend - 'The First Circle' by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn: The depiction of a paranoid Stalin is just great. Also (EAP is probably referring to) 'A day in the life of Ivan Denisovich' by same Author. I'm actually reading 'Victory Parades' by him at the moment! I think he is the only modern Russian author I've read.

    Thanks forumkins
    Last edited by BSturdy; 12-02-2005 at 01:53 AM.

  6. #36
    Registered User Raven Kaj's Avatar
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    I've seen alot of references on here for War and Peace and some of the other well knowns. But, unless I missed it somewhere scrolling through the postings, has anyone read, "Petersburg" by Andrei Bely??? Just curious if anyone has any remarks on that work.

  7. #37
    Registered User Anna Seis's Avatar
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    About Samizdat

    Hi, I like russian literature too, and I'd also rather read in the original lenguage instead of translations, but russian... it's too much for me. The last russian book I have read is Moscú-Petuchki; English translation must be Moscow to the end of the line. It's author is Venedict Erofeiev, and the subject is the last travel of an always drunk man -Vénitchka Erofeiev- who reachs the Kursk station every time he tries to find the Kremlim.
    I am triying to get material to write an essay about Samizdat; suggestions will be gratefully accepted.

  8. #38
    Drama Queen Koa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anna Seis
    Hi, I like russian literature too, and I'd also rather read in the original lenguage instead of translations, but russian... it's too much for me. The last russian book I have read is Moscú-Petuchki; English translation must be Moscow to the end of the line. It's author is Venedict Erofeiev, and the subject is the last travel of an always drunk man -Vénitchka Erofeiev- who reachs the Kursk station every time he tries to find the Kremlim.
    I am triying to get material to write an essay about Samizdat; suggestions will be gratefully accepted.

    I have just written my graduation thesis about Samizdat!!!

    The best material I can give you is this brilliant article
    http://www.slis.ualberta.ca/issues/sbalazs/samizdat.htm
    It compares samizdat to the Internet and provides a good summary of some main aspects of Samizdat...using it as a source gave a great touch of originality to my work.

    Then, my main sources were books that you probably don't have available since they are written in Italian and are probably not translated anywhere (I suppose you're Spanish, by how you wrote Moscù...), the main one was written in 1976 by Jurij Mal'cev and it's called L'altra letteratura ("the other literature")...
    You can find an interview to this guy here, it's in Italian but if you are Spanish as I think, you might get the idea of what it says...
    http://www.instoria.it/home/MalcevI.htm

    I suggest you also look for books about 'dissidents' and Russian emigration, they may give you some small idea..

    You should also have a look at Solzhenytsin "The oak and the lamb" (actually I have no idea of the title in English, the Russian title would literally translated as something like "Tha lamb hit the oak", especially the first chapter when he talks of how he worked to hide his stuff...

    And you have to know that just this year in Moscow was published an Anthology of Samizdat, though I dont know if you can find anything about it in languages that are not Russian...
    http://antology.igrunov.ru/
    http://www.pravda.ru/culture/2005/4/..._samizdat.html

    If you need more advice feel free to contact me, my work was a masterpiece
    dead on the inside, i've got nothing to prove
    keep me alive and give me something to lose

  9. #39
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    I too love Russian lit, particularly that of the 19th century. War and Peace is fun for a while, but it does gets too tedious. My favorites: Anna Karinina, Brothers Karamazov, Fathers and Sons. I don't know what makes the 19th century novelists so good. They have this combination of excruciating detail and yet holding a tremendous intensity. Quite unlike the French and English realists of the 19th century. Plus they have ideas, religious and sociatal. One thing that always struck me about the 19th century Russian novelists is that they are carrying medevil conventions and views but forced to confront the modern world. That's what may make them so intense. Plus they are just great writers.
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    "Love follows knowledge." – St. Catherine of Siena

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

  10. #40
    Drama Queen Koa's Avatar
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    I guess I agree with you Virgil... it's that intensity that can leave you speechless in some parts of the books...

    I'm trying to read again Master and Margarita, and just as the other time(s) I just can't concentrate on it. There's something in it that makes my mind wander instead of paying attention to the words (almost like reading War & Peace's historical parts where the same concept is expressed 300 times...almost but not quite like it obviously)... especially in the Pontius Pilatus chapter, It's the 3rd time I read it in my life, and every time I find it kinda tedious... I think I just don't understand Bulgakov...
    dead on the inside, i've got nothing to prove
    keep me alive and give me something to lose

  11. #41
    Mad Hatter Mark F.'s Avatar
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    I have read a few novels by Dostoevsky, my favorite is "Crime and Punishment" and "The Idiot" is also very good. Someone mentioned the length of his work and you should all check out his shorter stuff like "White Nights" and especially "Notes From The Underground" which is a true masterpiece.

    I've also read quite a few short stories by Gogol, "The Overcoat", "The Nose" and "Diary of a Madman" are all very good pieces of fiction. I want to read a bit more by Dostoevsky and read Tchekovs' plays and short stories.
    "And the worms, they will climb
    The rugged ladder of your spine"

  12. #42
    Registered User Anna Seis's Avatar
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    Excelente!!!

    Hi Koa, te agradezco, je vous remerci, thank you. I'm gonna visit all the sites you put into your message, this weekend. I'll fight italian difficulties. Russian Literature of 20th century is one of my caprices; in facts, all literatures of runaways and castaways and people on the run or writing in secret. I am thinking about relations between Dostoievsky's Man from underground and Moskow-Petouchki, viewing from an bakhtinian point of view. At University they refused the purpose, because they are most interested in Paul Auster, feminist literature, psychoanalysis... but I don't give up and I will keep on trying to write what I want to. Thanks again.
    Ps. I must read Solkhenitsin, of course; Evgenia Semionovna Ginzburg I have readed some years ago.

  13. #43
    Drama Queen Koa's Avatar
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    De nada, you're welcome, de rien... I particularly recommend the samizdat-internet article.

    Samizdat is a really interesting topicm shame they're so into feminism at your place Good luck!
    dead on the inside, i've got nothing to prove
    keep me alive and give me something to lose

  14. #44
    child's hour
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    Bukgakov

    Quote Originally Posted by Koa
    I think I just don't understand Bulgakov...

    what you have to understand about reading any of Bulgakov and especially Master and Margarita, the man was definitely not sober while writting it and hallucinating for most of it. That might be why it makes the mind wonder, cuz from my experience, whether i read him in russian or english, my mind wanders to places its never been before.

  15. #45
    Drama Queen Koa's Avatar
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    Is that true? Not sober? That would explain some things...
    My mind does wander too... just to thoughts that have nothing to do with the book...
    It's actually a few days since I last picked it up, I can't say I dislike it but it doesnt make me want to read it so eagerly...
    dead on the inside, i've got nothing to prove
    keep me alive and give me something to lose

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