Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 49

Thread: Where did we get that expression?

  1. #1
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge Mountains, SW VA
    Posts
    21,245
    Blog Entries
    133

    Talking Where did we get that expression?

    Where did we get the expression "mad as a Hatter"?
    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

  2. #2
    Smile samercury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    5,327
    Blog Entries
    15
    I have no idea??? I want to know too

  3. #3
    Serious business Taliesin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The West Pole
    Posts
    2,228
    Blog Entries
    3
    Hmm, we think that this has got something to do with the fact that hatters used mercury for their job, which is poisonous and made them freaky - mad. The expression existed long before Carroll, but we think that he made it more famous.
    If you believe even a half of this post, you are severely mistaken.

  4. #4
    Registered User shortysweetp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,055
    thats what i was thinking that it has something to do with the profession
    Trying to forget someone you love is like trying to remember someone you have never met.

  5. #5
    Lady of Smilies Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Now that would be telling it, wouldnt it?
    Posts
    13,715
    Blog Entries
    144

    Post

    Me me me oh wow I have a book on this...
    Quote Originally Posted by "Red herrings and White Elephants; The origins of the phrases we use everyday" By Albert Jack
    Mad As A Hatteris a term used to describe unpredictable behaviour. In the Middle Ages making felt hats involved a highly toxic substance called mercurous nitrate.This acid was known to cause tremblingin some people, a little like the symptoms of Parkingson's Disease, and those who suffered the effects in this way were assumed mad or crazy. During the 17th century tales were told about a man called Robert Crab, an eccentric living in Chesham, who was easily identified because of his distinictive hat and was known to locals as 'the mad hatter. He apparently gave away all his wealth to the poor and lived his life eating anything he could find in the countryside, such as grass, berries and dock leaves. The phrase passed over int the English language in the 19 th Century thanks to Lewis Carroll and his novel Alice in Wonderland. In the story Carroll invented a mad hatter but he may have been inspired by a real-life figure.
    And this has got to be one of my longest posts ever
    (after prievew ) or maybe not ....
    ps this book is A-mazing
    Last edited by Nightshade; 09-26-2005 at 04:42 AM. Reason: forgot distinictive hat in the bit about Robert crab!!
    My mission in life is to make YOU smile
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The time has come," the Walrus said,"To talk of many things:

    Forum Rules- You know you want to read 'em

    |Litnet Challange status = 5/260
    |currently reading

  6. #6
    Fingertips of Fury B-Mental's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    a rock on a beautiful mountain
    Posts
    4,569
    Blog Entries
    140
    Very well done Nightshade!

    You get a chorus line of dancing bug eyed yellow thingeys.

    Very industrious answer of precise origins!
    "I am glad to learn my friend that you had not yet submitted yourself to any of the mouldy laws of Literature."
    -John Muir


    "My candle burns at both ends; It will not last the night; But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends - It gives a lovely light"
    -Edna St. Vincent Millay

  7. #7
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge Mountains, SW VA
    Posts
    21,245
    Blog Entries
    133

    Talking

    Well done! I had hoped to catch a few with that one, but the egg is on my face! And there's your next phraze: Where did we get the phraze "you've got egg on your face"?
    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

  8. #8
    Lady of Smilies Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Now that would be telling it, wouldnt it?
    Posts
    13,715
    Blog Entries
    144
    ohh guess what this is also in my book

    Quote Originally Posted by red herrings and white elephants
    To have Egg on your face implies a decsion or choice has been made which later turns out to be a mistake, leaving a person looking foolish. Some suggest this is a relativly new phrase and originates in America during the election campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s. At the time it was common for opponents of a candidate to throw eggs at them in order to make them look foolissh. there is however, strong evidence to suggest the Victorian theatres hold the origin. At the time, during the slapstick comedies of the era, the fall guy would usually have eggs broken on his forehead to make him look foolish, not unlike taking a custard pie in the face. Those crazy Victorians!
    Okay now I have a q where does brass monkeys come from? Thats not in my book even though he says on theecover that he will explain it he doesnt which is a bit annoying as Ive always wondered about that one.


    *edit* It appears I just told a lie I found it under its full name that is "Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey" still it would be fun to find oput who else is under the missaprhension as to the origin and meaning of theis phrase
    Last edited by Nightshade; 09-26-2005 at 09:59 AM.
    My mission in life is to make YOU smile
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The time has come," the Walrus said,"To talk of many things:

    Forum Rules- You know you want to read 'em

    |Litnet Challange status = 5/260
    |currently reading

  9. #9
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge Mountains, SW VA
    Posts
    21,245
    Blog Entries
    133

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade
    *edit* It appears I just told a lie I found it under its full name that is "Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey" still it would be fun to find oput who else is under the missaprhension as to the origin and meaning of theis phrase
    That one I don't have. BTW, nice smiley! Don't keep us in suspense!
    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

  10. #10
    Lady of Smilies Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Now that would be telling it, wouldnt it?
    Posts
    13,715
    Blog Entries
    144
    okk here we go and is that what that toilet smilie means? Well who knew?!
    Quote Originally Posted by you ought to be able to guess by now
    The guns on 18th centuary men-of- war ships needed gun-powder to fire them, this was stoed in a different part of the ship for saftey reasons. young boys, often orphans, who were small enough to slip through tight spaces, carried this powder along tiny passsages and galleys. Because of their agility the lads became known as "powder monkeys" and by association the brass traysused to hold cannonballsbecame known as brass monkeys.these trays had 16 cannonball-sized indentations that would form the base of a cannonball pyramid. Brass was used because the balls would not stick to or rust on brass as they did with iron, but the drawback was that brasscontracts much faster in cold weather than iron. this meant that on severely cold days the indentations holding the lower level of cannonballs would contract spilling the pyramid over the deck, hence "cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey"
    Well I for one admit that I had a tottaly different idea of what freezing balls off meant but apparantly this appears to come from same source. and this expresion I always presumed brass monkeys had somthing to do with india.oh well we live and learn. Sort of like Sweet FA not standing for what you might think at all but has a rather grisley child murder story behind it
    My mission in life is to make YOU smile
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The time has come," the Walrus said,"To talk of many things:

    Forum Rules- You know you want to read 'em

    |Litnet Challange status = 5/260
    |currently reading

  11. #11
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge Mountains, SW VA
    Posts
    21,245
    Blog Entries
    133

    Talking

    I have no idea what the toliet smile means, I just found it hilarious! I, too, thought Oriential with the Brass monkey. Get our minds out of the gutter, right? The next pharaze is:
    Where did we get "once in a blue moon?"
    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

  12. #12
    Lady of Smilies Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Now that would be telling it, wouldnt it?
    Posts
    13,715
    Blog Entries
    144
    well seeing as Im at work without my trusty book
    Ill just guess itll remind me to find out Blue moon ....humm bet its medieval in origin and somthing to do with the weather

    FYI theres another book like the white elephant and red herring book out of course I have to buy it!
    My mission in life is to make YOU smile
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The time has come," the Walrus said,"To talk of many things:

    Forum Rules- You know you want to read 'em

    |Litnet Challange status = 5/260
    |currently reading

  13. #13
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge Mountains, SW VA
    Posts
    21,245
    Blog Entries
    133

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshade
    well seeing as Im at work without my trusty book
    Ill just guess itll remind me to find out Blue moon ....humm bet its medieval in origin and somthing to do with the weather

    FYI theres another book like the white elephant and red herring book out of course I have to buy it!
    Here ya go, straight from Uncle John Bathroom Reader Plunges *giggle* Into The Universe, page 320. "It refers to the second full moon within a month--a rare thing indeed. But over the course of a century there'll be 41 months with two full moons, so [once in a blue moon] really means--if you want to get literal--once every 2.4 years." How 'bout that, 'eh?

    Next: Where did we get the expression: "It's raining cats and dogs?"
    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

  14. #14
    Pièce de Résistance Scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Tweet @ScherLitNet
    Posts
    23,903
    Next: Where did we get the expression: "It's raining cats and dogs?"
    I believe we owe that one to Old MacDonalds (alas, he never gets credited for it).

    On a particularly gloomy afternoon, the old dear Mac Donalds looks outside his window to discover that it is pouring down. He turns around and says to his beloved cats and dogs (for he used to keep five of each at home) and says 'It is raining, Cats and Dogs!' His wife who happened to be in the kitchen at the time, overhears this and, being a woman of little education, she fails to appreciate the powers of punctuation and thinks that he said 'It is raining cats and dogs'. And next day, she spreads the word around in the town square that 'It rained cats and dogs yesterday' .
    Last edited by Scheherazade; 09-28-2005 at 08:43 AM.
    ~
    "It is not that I am mad; it is only that my head is different from yours.”
    ~


  15. #15
    Not politically correct Pendragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge Mountains, SW VA
    Posts
    21,245
    Blog Entries
    133

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Scheherazade
    I believe we owe that one to Old MacDonalds (alas, he never gets credited for it).

    On a particularly gloomy afternoon, the old dear Mac Donalds looks outside his window to discover that it is pouring down. He turns around and says to his beloved cats and dogs (for he used to keep five of each at home) and says 'It is raining, Cats and Dogs!' His wife who happened to be in the kitchen at the time, overhears this and, being a woman of little education, she fails to appreciate the powers of punctuation and thinks that he said 'It is raining cats and dogs'. And next day, she spreads the word around in the town square that 'It rained cats and dogs yesterday' .
    Incorrect, Scheherazade, but here's a lovely pink elephant for you:
    Some of us laugh
    Some of us cry
    Some of us smoke
    Some of us lie
    But it's all just the way
    that we cope with our lives...

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Lolita
    By waxmephilosophical in forum General Literature
    Replies: 236
    Last Post: 02-24-2015, 12:26 PM
  2. A Truly Atheist Society
    By Sitaram in forum Religious Texts
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 10-02-2008, 04:26 PM
  3. What this book is about..
    By Stasys in forum The Hunchback of Notre Dame
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-23-2005, 07:31 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •