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Thread: What is the most boring book ever?

  1. #406
    Registered User Yankee's Avatar
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    Thumbs down

    The most boring/awful novel I have ever read is Cell by Stephen King (I never did finish it...ugly bad):


  2. #407
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    Oh I finished "Cell" and it is very bad. Chucked it in the bin after - but that was caused by a strange compelling message flashing up on my mobile. Cannot agree about Robinson C. I'd read it four times before I was ten (Ah life on an isolated island! We had so little fun!). Gerhardie's book "Futility" takes some beating in the boredom stakes but Svevo's "As a Man Grows Older" just pips it.

  3. #408
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    It was Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Gave up half way. Could not continue. It was just awfully plodding and pedestrian. I could fall sleep reading it

    Quote Originally Posted by den View Post
    Well... the most recent borefest I tried to get through was Russell Banks' The Sweet Hereafter. Holy crap, couldn't stand it. I thought I would read the book before seeing the much vaunted movie. :-? A case of TMI and poor/lame/cliche/trite character development.
    Russell Banks' Cloudsplitter was a great book. Read half of it in high school and could not finish because I had no time and the book was long. But would still recommend it (so that the impression of Banks on you could be redeemed!)
    "This is the sort of bloody nonsense up with which I will not put." --- Winston Churchill, Winner of Nobel Prize of Literature

  4. #409
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stlukesguild View Post
    That's ridiculous. I call Argumentum Ad Populum. (Many people like a book, not liking it makes you lazy is a complete nonsequitur.)

    There is a difference between a book that is "popular" and one that is recognized as a "classic." Of course we all like what we like... but there is something to be said for the ability to recognize that there is a difference between what we "like" and "dislike" and what is "good" or "bad." If we find this or that "classic" to be dreadfully boring it probably says more about us as readers than it does about the failings of the author.

    This, basically. As for Shakespeare, once you get used to the language, it really isn't hard to read (although you might get a bit lost in the histories with who is who).

    If you're reading a classic book and hate it, it's at least worth thinking about why you didn't like it. You can acknowledge a book's merits and still say that you didn't like it. For example, I gave up on Moby Dick because of all those whale chapters. Personally I found those bits boring but I can see how they might be interesting. It's also quite long but I can see that it is intended as an 'epic'.

  5. #410
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelby_lake View Post
    This, basically. As for Shakespeare, once you get used to the language, it really isn't hard to read (although you might get a bit lost in the histories with who is who).

    If you're reading a classic book and hate it, it's at least worth thinking about why you didn't like it. You can acknowledge a book's merits and still say that you didn't like it. For example, I gave up on Moby Dick because of all those whale chapters. Personally I found those bits boring but I can see how they might be interesting. It's also quite long but I can see that it is intended as an 'epic'.
    That's not entirely true. The definition of "classics" change through time. What one person consider classic may be garbage to another. For example, Petrarch's epic poem "Africa" was considered a great classic hundreds of years ago, but now nobody reads it. I read parts of it and still consider it to be a great poem, but literary critics/compilers today do not include it in any list of "classics". Back then the works of African-American authors are not included in the canon of classics, but now we are (correctly) more inclusive and have gone beyond the "dead white men". The works of Anne Bronte (I've not read any) may well be of very high quality and may well be even better than Jane Eyre/Wuthering Heights, but even readers of classics don't read them today - that doesn't mean they are not as good as the famous classics. So - yes, preferences have affected what are considered classic literature and what are not
    "This is the sort of bloody nonsense up with which I will not put." --- Winston Churchill, Winner of Nobel Prize of Literature

  6. #411
    Registered User FenwickS's Avatar
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    It's not really a book, but a section of the book, which I found tedious, and that's Father Zossima's "rant" in the Brothers Karamazov. Because of my love for Dostoevsky's works I thought I'd push through it, and I eventually did, but man it wasn't easy.
    "Without art, the crudeness of reality would make the world unbearable."- George Bernard Shaw

  7. #412
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    I haven't had any experienced any book that bored me to death. Lucky me!

  8. #413
    confidentially pleased cacian's Avatar
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    On second thoughts I think I would say that if a book is boring then the writer is boring too.
    Is there such a thing as a boring writer?
    it may never try
    but when it does it sigh
    it is just that
    good
    it fly

  9. #414
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    The most boring book I have ever read, and I have read some very boring books, was James the Brother of Jesus: the key to unlocking the secret by Robert H. Eisenman. I must have read it in 2001 or 2002. I decided to read it after reading the Dead Sea Scrolls Deception by Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh. That book may have been somewhat sensationalist, but it was very readable. They argued that St Paul was the "Spouter of Lies" from the Dead Sea Scrolls, among a lot of other allegations, and that the Catholic Church was blocking access to the scrolls to other biblical scholars because the contents would undermine Christianity. I started reading it at bedtime and didn't stop reading it till I had finished. Baigent and Leigh referred to a biblical scholar they had tagged along with, namely Robert H Eisenman, so I ordered his book, James the Brother of Jesus. This was a doorstop of a book, two or three inches thick. It might have been less than one inch if he had not kept on repeating everything again and again. For much of it, he was basically arguing how sometimes different names referred to the same person, while at other times the same name referred to different people. The more he repeated his arguments, the less clear they became. It must have taken me months of bedtime reading to get through. There were some interesting bits in the book. It just could just have been written much, much more concisely.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

  10. #415
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mason Pringle View Post
    It was Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Gave up half way. Could not continue. It was just awfully plodding and pedestrian. I could fall sleep reading it
    I love Pride and Prejudice. It starts quite boring, but once Darcy sends the letter to Lizzy, I can't put it down.

    The most boring book I have ever read is "Senhora", by Josť de Alencar. It's a Brazilian classic, but even my literature teacher admits it's crap. I also find "Saturday" by Ian McEwan boring, but it's just because I prefer plot over style - I'm a slow reader, so reading the first pages of Saturday was like a torture to me. I gave up in the beggining because I noticed it wouldn't get better (and it's quite Ulysses, a "one-day plot").
    (take it easy about my English - I'm Brazilian and my only experience with the language is reading)

  11. #416
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    boring

    I have a different opinion on boring and or bad books/ novels I've never read one! I think that if a book doesn't captivate me and forces me to continue reading it without wanting to stop ,,,well very easly I put it down forget about it,,,,a book has to keep me wanting to know whats next I've got to keep reading or I close it!!!!!!!!

  12. #417
    Registered User LaMaga's Avatar
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    Mein kampf and The Origin of Species.

  13. #418
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    Good lord...

    The Mill on the Floss (I swear my eyes bled boredom with this one. Though I must admit, the ending was beautiful).

    Moby Dick (How many pages do you need to describe a man's obsession with a whale. No really).

    War and Peace (After a couple hundred pages I felt like I'd rather watch paint dry).

  14. #419
    Existentialist Varenne Rodin's Avatar
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    Lasher - Anne Rice. Terrible.

    Umberto Eco books. Heavy prose. Too heavy. Speaking a lot to say just a little. Sorry, nerds.

  15. #420
    Registered User Grit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varenne Rodin View Post
    Sorry, nerds.
    Haha that made me laugh. I just imagined how it'd be said out loud. Like denying a much-wanted sandwich.

    Any book that's too outdated usually bores me. I don't read to decipher obsolete use of the English language, I read to escape.
    While the truncheon may be used
    in lieu of conversation,
    words will always retain their power.
    Words offer the means to meaning,
    and for those who will listen,
    the enunciation of truth.

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