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Thread: From The Sports Desk

  1. #286
    Registered User hellsapoppin's Avatar
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    poppin, if you are not already doing so, by way of helping preserve your mobility, lemme encourage you towards swimming/water exercise and some cycling

    I do just a little bit of yoga every day, especially the breathing exercises but not much else. It's just too painful to do anything else darn it.
    When stupidity is considered patriotism, it is unsafe to be intelligent

    ~ Isaac Asimov

  2. #287
    Registered User bounty's Avatar
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    moving in water and on a bicycle are both easier than walking and because of that, there's a good chance one or both of them will be pain free for you, or at least, pain reduced.

  3. #288
    running amok Sancho's Avatar
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    Oh yeah, I'm a big believer in swimming for health and flexibility. Evidently so is Kramer:

    Exercises every muscle in the body. It's great for the back. 4 hours in this chop and I'm a full inch taller!
    I can't say that I recommend swimming in the East River though.

    https://youtu.be/0hK3pBcY3k0?si=Xed8DD_0WJJvMNf-

    Is there anything not covered by Seinfeld?
    Uhhhh...

  4. #289
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    I think all the characters had a sort of essentialness to them, but id vote for Kramer as the most valuable player in the show.

  5. #290
    running amok Sancho's Avatar
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    No way, man. Newman was the MVP.

    I remember a good article in Outside Magazine about the benefits of an impact workout. The writer looked at running vs cycling for the lower body, and boxing vs swimming for the upper body. The prevailing consensus of the day was to avoid impact workouts because that sort of thing would lead to the breaking down of your bones. (We all know someone who quit running because his “knees gave out”) The gist of the article was the contrarian view that the body needs impact to signal strong bone growth. He mentioned connective tissue, but the article was mainly about bones. The illustration introducing the piece was an artist’s rendition of two femur bones, one long and slender and the other massive and heavy. The bones were labeled: Swimmer’s Leg, Runner’s Leg. The runner’s leg looked like it belonged to a gorilla, and the swimmer’s leg looked like it might snap in a stiff breeze. Anyway the article made a lot of sense to me. And I still like to run, just not every day anymore.

    In another part of the article he analyzed the mineral cost to the body a distance athlete pays. By distance athlete, he means someone under exertion for more than two hours, marathon runners, stage cyclists, backpackers, stuff like that. He essentially took an athlete’s jersey after the event and rung out the sweat. Then he analyzed what minerals had been leached out. What he found was that distance athletes are loosing a lot of calcium, and probably should be taking a supplement.

    At any rate, I took the article to heart and have never shied away from “impact” sports. Even cycling for me involves impact. I impact the road on occasion and sometimes cars, or trees from time to time while mountain biking, but that’s really another subject.

    I wish I could find the article. It’s from about 20 years ago. As I recall it was a two-parter.
    Uhhhh...

  6. #291
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    nooooo, in baseball terms, id put newman as the best relief pitcher or pinch hitter.

    I don't think ive ever mentioned it here before Sancho, and hopefully this doesnt come off as pretentious, i have a phd in the stuff youre talking about and taught it at the college level. I also studied eating disorders and coached track & field and cross-country.

    going into grad school I was already carrying with me a love of literature. by the time I came out I was so enamored with it, especially for its potential vocationally, that I actually applied to a grad program in English. visited the campus, met with the dept head, had a good conversation and applied---but possibly amongst other reasons, they couldn't get over my not having an undergrad in English and alas I didn't get accepted.

    on the topic of "impact"----my goodness any chance you read/saw/heard about the crash today in the tour of the alps? borderline horrific while it was happening and then nerve wracking immediately afterwards because the guy wasn't moving much after slamming head first into a light post. i'll do some looking to see if I can find it.

    found it---all the more "exciting" for the foreign language commentary:

    https://cyclinguptodate.com/cycling/...the-alps-crash (scroll down towards the bottom)
    Last edited by bounty; 04-18-2024 at 06:40 PM.

  7. #292
    running amok Sancho's Avatar
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    Naw, man,not pretentious, you did the work. But hey, you gotta research degree!? Holy moly. Now it seems like I'm the guy at a dinner party, patiently explaining to my table mate how the brain works **slap my belly and stab the air with a drumstick** ďwell, donítícha know, the brain is made up of these things called neurons and synapses, and the different parts of the brain specialize in different stuff, like language, or math, or where you left your car keys, and, well, donítícha know, that's how the brain works.Ē This goes on for quite some time and only later do I find out my table mate is a neurosurgeon. Ah well.

    I think most of us here are drawn to literature in some way or another. I am and I donít know why. Itís just something Iíve always enjoyed. I can't remember a time in my adult life when I wasn't reading a book. I much prefer reading to watching TV or a movie. Given the choice Iídíve probably studied it in school, but college was vocational for me (Mechanical Engineering). And honestly at that time in my life I probably wouldnít have survived the English Department. I could sit in the library during the wee hours working a Thermodynamics problem, but I doubt Iídíve been very good at peeling the onion where great literature is concerned. A Thermo problem has an answer. This or that. Right or wrong. But great lit is nuanced. It can mean a lot of things to a lot of people. Itís sometimes in conflict with itself. That wouldíve bothered me when I was 20.

    Concerning the video ó Yeech! Having a hard head will carry you far in this world. When I was a kid there was a college professor in my town who killed himself doing a header from his bike into the back of a panel van. He was in the drops and hammering away, probably looking at his front wheel. Never saw it coming. Also no helmet. Nobody wore a helmet back then, unless it was one of those leather strippy things that were high on style and low on function. I think he was in Life Sciences, U of So Car.
    Last edited by Sancho; 04-19-2024 at 10:49 AM.
    Uhhhh...

  8. #293
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    i appreciate that thank you.

    you might get a small kick out of this---although much beyond the elementary levels its a stretch for me---among other things, I also taught biomechanics.

    when I was in high school my mother worked for a medical clinic and she'd regularly bring home a journal for me called "physician and sports medicine." that lead me into joining the American college of sports medicine for a brief time and getting their journal "medicine and science in sports and exercise." they were mostly filled with physiology and biomechanics articles, the latter of which were always predicated on an understanding of higher math that I didn't have and never pursued.

    you might get an extra kick out of this---I met a biomechanics bigwig once who was instrumental in the development of the technology used to create Gollum in lord of the rings. pretty neat stuff.

    there is an inscription outside one of the libraries at penn state "the true university of these days is a collection of books." and then of course the attachment...

    I actually did that once. was starting off in a time trial mode, drifted a smidgen off to the right and rode smack into a parked car, flew over the handlebars into the back windshield. I hadn't built up a full head of steam yet so I wasn't going fast enough to get badly hurt, but I dented the guys bumper, bent my forks and of course the ego damage!

    thankfully the fellow in the video wasn't badly hurt.

    liege-Bastogne-liege this weekend...first meeting of the season (I think) between van der
    poel and pogacar.

    off in different direction, more germane to the thread--my dentist is a baseball fan and his kids play. every so often i'll drop off some baseball books in his mailbox. one of the recent drop-offs was the shortstop by zane grey. we all know him as a western author and pay little attention to that he wrote baseball stories too.
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    Last edited by bounty; 04-19-2024 at 05:37 PM.

  9. #294
    Registered User hellsapoppin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bounty View Post
    moving in water and on a bicycle are both easier than walking and because of that, there's a good chance one or both of them will be pain free for you, or at least, pain reduced.

    Very kind of you to say that.

    Went to the chiropractor and he asked whether I do any of the exercises he recommended. Alas, I told him, every time I try to do any the pain comes back and gets worse. So, I pretty much just sit and do a few arm & leg movements but not much else.



    As for swimming in the East River, I gotta say that I always wished I had been a rower ~ would have loved to row in it, the Hudson, the Charles, the Housatonic, and the Schuylkill. Such a great sport!
    When stupidity is considered patriotism, it is unsafe to be intelligent

    ~ Isaac Asimov

  10. #295
    running amok Sancho's Avatar
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    Haha! Iím gonna need one of those book bags. I actually met John Waters once, sounds like something heíd say.

    Hey, have you read The Boys In The Boat, by Daniel James Brown? Pretty good. Iíve got a rowing machine in my basement, but I gotta say the biomechanics of the rowing motion makes my back hurt. (I donít need higher math to figure that out) Out on the water I much prefer a kayak or a canoe. Added bonus ó you get to look forward.

    Iím going to put the Zane Grey book on my list. I like it when a writer breaks genre. Michael Lewis got away from financial books when he wrote Money Ball and The Blind Side. John Grisham wrote a darn good baseball book, Calico Joe. Michael Shaaraís For Love of the Game is a fine read.
    Uhhhh...

  11. #296
    Registered User hellsapoppin's Avatar
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    Hey, have you read The Boys In The Boat, by Daniel James Brown?

    Outstanding book and there's also a great documentary that covers the same matter.

    I've decided to read Gone With The Wind by Margaret Mitchell. Will read as much as I can and follow along on audio book.
    When stupidity is considered patriotism, it is unsafe to be intelligent

    ~ Isaac Asimov

  12. #297
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    grey wrote a handful of baseball stories Sancho. ive not read any yet, but ive got a few. he was a player himself.

    I also have the boys in the boat but haven't read that yet either.

    poppin, I read gone with the wind ~last year and thoroughly enjoyed it. a compelling story written in an accessible style. there are a few dormant threads on the book and I picked one to belatedly join in on. for the life of me now though I cant find the thread.

    tadej pogacar laid waste to the field today at liege-Bastogne-liege. incredibly impressive.

    found it:

    http://www.online-literature.com/for...+with+the+wind
    Last edited by bounty; 04-21-2024 at 06:56 PM.

  13. #298
    running amok Sancho's Avatar
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    Speaking of cycling, I did a strange thing the other day — I bought a unicycle. What hoot. I built one years ago out of spare parts and managed to teach myself a few tricks, but I haven’t been on a unicycle in many-many years. The past few days I’ve been the source of some high comedy in the ‘hood. Also my quads are screaming.
    Uhhhh...

  14. #299
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    that's interesting to hear. I imagine the lack of speed means no road rash, but I wonder how the bumps and bruises and wounded ego categories go?

  15. #300
    running amok Sancho's Avatar
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    Bah, while it’s not quite like riding a bike, I did find my balance fairly quickly. The muscle memory was still there, sort of. The comedy came from the neighborhood dogs who evidently were indignant about the strange man/machine contraption wobbling down the road. That reminds me, I gotta work on my backwards riding technique.
    Uhhhh...

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