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Thread: The Trial for Murder: Why are the spooky guys in Piccadilly "going from west to east"

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    The Trial for Murder: Why are the spooky guys in Piccadilly "going from west to east"

    The Trial for Murder: Why are the spooky guys in Piccadilly "going from west to east"?
    I am expecting some street names, for instance going from St. James's Street to XYZ. So I guess "going from west to east" has a special meaning.
    What is it?

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    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    British Dickenīs fans should be more able to anwer this. But in which of his books was this trial mentioned?
    #Stay home as much as you can and stay well

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    Hi Danik,
    thanks for your answer.
    "The Trial for Murder" is an excellent short story which I have in The Selected Illustrated Works of Charles Dickens. The Christmas Books, Ghost Stories & Other Tales. London: Wordsworth Library Collection, 2010.

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    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Hi, gavagai and thanks

    I read most of Dickens' works but I didnīt know this story. Itīs very good indeed, here is the link, if anyone else wants to read it.
    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-st...TriaMurd.shtml

    But I donīt know if there is any meaning in the ghosts going from west to east. I suppose it depends of what districts lie in their direction. The important thing seems to be their going through crowded Piccadilly without being noticed.

    Tried to post this answer twice yesterday but didnīt succeed.
    #Stay home as much as you can and stay well

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    Quote Originally Posted by gavagai View Post
    The Trial for Murder: Why are the spooky guys in Piccadilly "going from west to east"?
    I am expecting some street names, for instance going from St. James's Street to XYZ. So I guess "going from west to east" has a special meaning.
    What is it?
    My guess is that they are moving in the opposite direction of the sun. So, Dickens is using this to emphasise their spookiness.

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    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Maybe, sandy. I canīt see a difference in the direction they take. I think the spookiness is in their looks and in the way they move aroun being noticed only by the narrator.

    This story made me think, what those trials would be like if every victim of murder took care that justice would be done.
    #Stay home as much as you can and stay well

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