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Thread: Brexit-Do our British members want congrats or condolences?

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    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Brexit-Do our British members want congrats or condolences?

    Brexit is now a reality. The telly showed the celebrations. But how do you people feel about it?
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

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    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    I was unable to vote at the time as I was working overseas, but would have voted to remain. I enjoyed up to now, the freedom of movement as a visitor to Europe, and also the cultural diversity in the UK.

    But I can understand where the Brexit momentum has come from; populist politicians like Boris Johnson, Nigel Farage & Trump have played on the lowest common denominator of man's prejudice against foreigners, waffled on & lied about taking back control, a bright future outside etc. The country, even families are still bitterly divided. Scotland and Northern Ireland wanted to stay, Wales and England to depart, the older generation in general want out, and the younger ones see their future being curtailed.

    Now we have two sides: one jubilant, one resigned to having lost. It will be interesting to see the general feeling 6 months or a year from now when the Conservative honeymoon is over: Breakaway of Scotland & Northern Ireland? / Trump pushing US farming goods & more expensive drugs in a trade deal? / Hard Brexit at the end of 2020 with tariffs? / Fights over Gibraltar & fishing rights? It certainly won't be dull.

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    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    Well I voted out. I am worried about Scotland though.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

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    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    And so you should be. My whole impression of Boris is of bluff, winging it and being a chancer. It might work out, but it's very much uncharted territory

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    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Thanks for your contribuitions gentlemen:
    I was unable to vote at the time as I was working overseas, but would have voted to remain. I enjoyed up to now, the freedom of movement as a visitor to Europe, and also the cultural diversity in the UK.
    It is very refreshing to have this statement from a Briton, because the idea that the Brexiters convey, is that they only lose by the association. I am also sorry of losing this freedom to travel to Britain(I have an Euro passport) for I love the country and its cultural contributions. But I believe that working in foreign countries has contributed to a broader, maybe I should say more international perspective.

    But I can understand where the Brexit momentum has come from; populist politicians like Boris Johnson, Nigel Farage & Trump have played on the lowest common denominator of man's prejudice against foreigners, waffled on & lied about taking back control, a bright future outside etc. The country, even families are still bitterly divided. Scotland and Northern Ireland wanted to stay, Wales and England to depart, the older generation in general want out, and the younger ones see their future being curtailed.
    To me this division seems not restrictet only to UK, not even only to Europe. In times of general exodus, it seems to me that the countries that are more solidly established socially and economically are in fear of being overrun by strangers and losing an identity that has been build along many centuries. But I think that some change is inevitable. The difference lies in how it is met, peacefully or violently.

    Now we have two sides: one jubilant, one resigned to having lost. It will be interesting to see the general feeling 6 months or a year from now when the Conservative honeymoon is over: Breakaway of Scotland & Northern Ireland? / Trump pushing US farming goods & more expensive drugs in a trade deal? / Hard Brexit at the end of 2020 with tariffs? / Fights over Gibraltar & fishing rights? It certainly won't be dull.
    Yes, letīs wait for developments.

    Well I voted out. I am worried about Scotland though.
    It is good to have both sides here. It would be good to learn from you what you expect from Brexit.

    I am worried about dear old world. For me Brexit is only one major issue of the conservative trend that one notices in general.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

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    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    I saw the EU was on course to becoming a United States of Europe. It seemed pretty clear that's what they wanted. A secondary concern was that the EU is not particularly democratic.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

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    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    In theory the EU is a great idea in terms of economics.

    But they have their own internal inflexible elites; hence countries like Hungary & Poland kicking back.

    Free movement was handled in too clumsy a manner for the divisions it caused, as Merkel is realising to her political cost.

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