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    Poll: Among other things, the author seems to be...

    Among other things, the author seems to be recommending sympathy for grieving widowers and eccentric gays. The play begins with discussion of Antonio's melancholy. One possible cause is clearly...
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    Poll: And Professor Bate tells us that Shakespeare...

    And Professor Bate tells us that Shakespeare "found in Ovid a great store of examples of female feeling---something that was notably lacking in many of his other models, such as the plays of Marlowe...
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    Poll: The author also recommends comparison of Shylock...

    The author also recommends comparison of Shylock and Capulet. Capulet says to his daughter: "How, how, how ,how, chop-logic? What is this?............But fettle your fine joints 'gainst Thursday...
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    Poll: I'll return to Marlowe's death later. In his...

    I'll return to Marlowe's death later. In his introduction, Professor Drakakis notes that a play called THE THREE LADIES OF LONDON "was evidently popular " in the early 1580's. Bevington tells us...
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    Poll: Professor Bevington suggested that "Renaissance...

    Professor Bevington suggested that "Renaissance Neoplatonism, depicting love as a chain or ladder from the basest carnality to the supreme love of God for man," helps explain Antonio's relationship...
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    Poll: Another puzzle we have is how did Portia and her...

    Another puzzle we have is how did Portia and her cousin prepare for the court appearance? Bellario's letter to the Duke reads: "We turned o'er many books together"(MV4.1.156). On the other hand,...
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    Poll: During the play within the play in MND we have: ...

    During the play within the play in MND we have: "The best in this kind are but shadows; and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend them," and Hippolyta's reply, "It must be your imagination...
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    Poll: In post #192, you mention "original context." I...

    In post #192, you mention "original context." I noted that the phrase "merry sport" is found in Act 1, scene 3. Therefore, why did Shakespeare put it there? I've been suggesting that context is...
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    Poll: The truth. Here in the Chicago area we've had...

    The truth. Here in the Chicago area we've had Roman Catholic holy man Cardinal Cupich performing on Sunday mornings on television for a half hour. If you type in "the who, live at leeds, tommy, go...
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    Poll: A great while ago, Professor Parrott wrote that...

    A great while ago, Professor Parrott wrote that the Sonnets were mostly written "somewhere between 1594 and 1598; some, it may be, later." This is exactly the period when MND, R&J and MV were...
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    Poll: And thanks, Danik, for pointing the way back to...

    And thanks, Danik, for pointing the way back to Portia: "Tarry a little, there is something else"(MV4.1.302). Or, as Professor Mahon put it: "Again, the most effective readings, of whatever...
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    Poll: We may both be in the ballpark, so to speak,...

    We may both be in the ballpark, so to speak, regarding Antonio: "Two loves I have of comfort and despair, / Which like two spirits do suggest me still: / The better angel is a man right fair, / The...
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    Poll: And

    I caught a performance of the 1994 Goodman Theatre production in Chicago. One critic wrote: "At it's best a fascinating mess." The actor playing Antonio was excellent, however. At one point there...
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    Poll: Ok

    I'll try to do so. I remember your comment as it is part of a very fine discussion of the Sonnets and pointed the way back to AS YOU LIKE IT. Your comment(#172) here that Antonio is saying that...
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    Poll: MV andAYL

    And Danik, one of your comments in kev67's Sonnet thread(5/13/2019) might remind one that "The lunatic, the lover, and the poet are / Are of imagination all compact" (MND5.1.7-8). Lancelet the clown...
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    Poll: The "strange nature" of the suit

    In his book THE AGE OF SHAKESPEARE, Professor Kermode wrote of the trial or court scene: "The trial is folklore, and the judgment comes from a folklore lawyer, but the issues are real enough." ...
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    Poll: oops

    The line in KING LEAR from Kent is actually a bit later, Act 1 scene 4. Now, one comment earlier in this thread, "The arrogance(and stupidity) of the man is staggering.........What a twit!" might...
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    Poll: There are three lines in KING LEAR that I like to...

    There are three lines in KING LEAR that I like to recall. In the first scene, Kent says to Lear: "This is not altogether fool, my lord." Gloucester's last line is "And that's true too." In the...
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    Poll: More linguistic connections

    In the first scene of MV we find: "I pray you, good Bassanio, let me know it, / And if it stand as you yourself still do, / Within the eye of honor, be assured / My purse, my person, my extremest...
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    Poll: The main conflict

    In Act 5, scene 3 of R&J, Romeo and Count Paris are both grieving the reported death of Juliet. They confront each other and Romeo kills Paris. In MV, we find Shylock and Antonio in confrontation. ...
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    Poll: More Regarding Professor Wilson

    Wilson's book is in a library miles away. I believe he simply wrote that comparison is "interesting" and both plays have tragical and comical elements. He also wrote that he found Shakespeare's...
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    Poll: One thing at a time

    One minute subject at a time. Professor Thomas Parrott wrote that MV is "a romantic comedy, almost a fairy tale, rendered credible by the poet's art." In her book, THE FRIENDLY SHAKESPEARE, Norrie...
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    Poll: Eminent scholar J. Dover Wilson recommended...

    Eminent scholar J. Dover Wilson recommended comparing MV and ROMEO AND JULIET in his book SHAKESPEARE'S HAPPY COMEDIES. The passage before us corresponds to a passage in R&J. Juliet's line, "all...
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    Poll: Furthermore

    In Act 3,scene 3 we have Solanio's "I am sure the Duke / Will never grant this forfeiture to hold," and Antonio's reply: "The Duke cannot deny the course of law, / For the commodity that strangers...
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    And Shakespeare, I think, allows the reader to...

    And Shakespeare, I think, allows the reader to cautiously infer the poet. The epilogue at the end of THE TEMPEST may be regarded both as the character Prospero's entreaty and the author himself...
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