Search:

Type: Posts; User: mike thomas; Keyword(s):

Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 4

Search: Search took 0.02 seconds.

  1. Thanks for that Danik 2016 I believe they're...

    Thanks for that Danik 2016

    I believe they're formed from part of some kind of plant, therefore all of their body are stems and leaves etc. But I never considered waves.

    cheers
  2. Thanks for the input YesNo, I agree with you:...

    Thanks for the input YesNo,

    I agree with you: they do look more like dogs. I think their mouths have been drawn to perhaps represent loud noise, such as a watch dog's bark.
  3. Can anyone help with identifying this engraving please?

    Not sure if this post would be better suited to poetry/Shakespeare's Sonnets, but as it is regarding an engraved work of art, I thought this might be a better place.

    I have uploaded the item in...
  4. It seems then that WS sonnets are unique in this...

    It seems then that WS sonnets are unique in this respect
  5. Wow that was quick! Thank you YesNo: I mean a...

    Wow that was quick! Thank you YesNo:

    I mean a poem/sonnet ( or anything whatever) in which the writer/author addresses two other individuals as lover, but those individuals themselves love each...
  6. Shakespeare's "love triangle" sonnets: any other such poetry exist?

    Hi all, apologies if this subject is in the wrong forum, badly phrased, or maybe too deep:

    Many writers claim that Shakespeare's Sonnets involve a love triangle: I have been looking for an example...
  7. Replies
    4
    Views
    6,308

    Well thank you all very much for such good ideas:...

    Well thank you all very much for such good ideas: I think things are now a lot clearer:

    My best regards to all, and cheers for the good info
  8. Replies
    0
    Views
    6,976

    Shakespeare's sonnets: the love triangle

    Hi all:

    I have been looking for an example (other than Shakespeare) of sonnets which use a love triangle as its basis: Is Shakespeare's work unique in this respect?

    Can anyone please help with...
  9. Replies
    4
    Views
    6,308

    Stone the crows

    Greetings folks,

    I wonder if any kind person can help with a passage from King Lear (Act 5, scene 3):

    Howl, howl, howl, howl! O, you are men of stone. *
    Had I your tongues and eyes, I'ld use...
  10. yes, that's the word: iambic pentameter. Is that...

    yes, that's the word: iambic pentameter. Is that what those two lines are?
  11. re what is it for:

    Its the first two lines of verse, from the epitaph on the Stratford 'Shakespeare monument. I was stumped at making it scan, after I was informed that it is a 10 syllable per line verse. I forget the...
  12. A technical question regarding Shakespeare's Stratford epitaph

    Hi forum

    I have been banging my head against a brick wall over this:

    The first two lines of verse in the Shaksepeare epitaph are these:

    STAY PASSENGER, WHY GOEST THOU BY SO FAST?
    READ IF...
  13. Replies
    1
    Views
    1,332

    Shakespeare, Hamlet: Yorik

    Hi forum.

    I have been reading much Shakespeare, searching for another person's name which begins with Y, but alas, nothing doing.

    It's driving me round the bend :-( Anyone know of a site which...
  14. Replies
    3
    Views
    17,278

    I went back and did another foot count of the...

    I went back and did another foot count of the witches spell:

    Witch #1 says: "Toad, that under cold stone,"

    I read three feet in this line, not three and a half.

    The only way to squeeze half...
  15. Replies
    3
    Views
    17,278

    Thanks again Charles. As always, an astute and...

    Thanks again Charles. As always, an astute and very interesting reply.

    I agree with you on the measure thing: each line contains 7 'beats', tempo wise, thus 3 1/2 feet. But what I am concerned...
  16. Replies
    3
    Views
    17,278

    The famous spell

    Hi all.

    In Macbeth act 4 scene 1 witch number 3 says

    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,

    Witches mummy, maw, and gulfe

    Of the ravin'd salt sea shark:
  17. Replies
    3
    Views
    2,569

    Thanks for saving my sanity Charles. Did you...

    Thanks for saving my sanity Charles.

    Did you know Homer simson was my twin brother?
  18. Replies
    3
    Views
    2,569

    Who is Diablo?

    Hi all. This part from Othello is driving me bonkers:

    Cassio. Drunke?

    Iago. Away I say: go out and cry a mutiny.

    Nay good lieutenant. Alas gentlemen:

    Help hoa. Lieutenant. Sir Montano:
  19. Replies
    19
    Views
    10,722

    someone with sense at last

    Now there's an idea! It always puzzled me that phrase "second best bed": I mean, why 'second'? was there a third best bed as well? who (or what) slept in the last best bed?

    The term implies a...
  20. Replies
    19
    Views
    10,722

    defending the indefencible

    I could broaden this to bring up the fact that he was just about the marry another at the same time. As for his writing a will: in fact he never wrote any such thing. That he used the title of 'wife'...
  21. Replies
    103
    Views
    80,540

    how true is that

    I agree with that
  22. Replies
    3
    Views
    3,993

    a spiritual reply

    thanks for thae help folks.
  23. Replies
    19
    Views
    10,722

    romantic implications???

    "the romantic implications of Shakespeare bequeathing their marital bed."

    First of all, there's not a shred of evidence to suggest Anne Hathwey was entitled to anything. It angers me when scholars...
  24. Replies
    19
    Views
    10,722

    uh?

    You know **** all about me

    Your reply says agreat deal about you though: defending that kind of selfish swine.
  25. Replies
    103
    Views
    80,540

    I like it

    Yes I do agree with ORBI but I'm not sure you are a wind-up merchant. What do you mean by "I really am quite worried about whoever wrote the linked webpage" ?

    Worried? Why so friend?
Results 1 to 25 of 182
Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 4