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    Poll: As the Friar's monologue(R&J2.2) reaches it's...

    As the Friar's monologue(R&J2.2) reaches it's conclusion, Romeo enters and says: "Good morrow, father." This corresponds to Lancelet's 'O heavens, this is my true-begotten father"(MV2.2.28). Bate...
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    Poll: Shylock's "Mark what Jacob...

    Shylock's "Mark what Jacob did:................The skillful shepherd peeled me certain wands, / And in the doing of the deed of kind, / He stuck them up before the fulsome ewes, / Who then...
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    Poll: Professor Halio's introduction(see post #243,...

    Professor Halio's introduction(see post #243, page 17) suggests that we should expect various opinions regarding the author's Biblical allusions. You may find having a look at the King James...
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    Poll: That is, following the Prologue in ROMEO AND...

    That is, following the Prologue in ROMEO AND JULIET, as we have seen, the first and last lines of the ensuing conversation are together an allusion to the first line of the Gospel of John. The play...
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    Poll: Professor Bloom also wrote in 1986 that...

    Professor Bloom also wrote in 1986 that "Shakespearean representation presents us with many perplexities throughout the comedies and romances: Angelo and Malvolio, among others, are perhaps as...
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    Poll: For the RSC edition(2007), Professor Bate wrote; ...

    For the RSC edition(2007), Professor Bate wrote; "shortly after the second world war, the Canadian literary critic Northrop Frye published a short essay that inaugurated the modern understanding...
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    Poll: I think you can see the article at...

    I think you can see the article at www.firstthings.com, then click issues archive, and june/july 2004. That is, as elsewhere, one is allowed a free sample, so to speak.
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    Poll: There's a fine article, a far ranging book...

    There's a fine article, a far ranging book review, by the late scholar Edward T. Oakes, S.J. in the journal FIRST THINGS, June/July 2004, Number144. Part of his conclusion reads: "So who knows what...
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    Poll: In MV, the author at times makes it difficult to...

    In MV, the author at times makes it difficult to determine where religion is an issue: "Now by two-headed Janus, / Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time. / Some that will evermore peep...
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    Poll: Another interesting hypothesis(post # 297). One...

    Another interesting hypothesis(post # 297). One might recall Tybalt's "Now, by the stock and honor of my kin, / To strike him dead I hold it not a sin"(ROM1.5.60-1). In turn, Romeo says to Juliet: ...
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    Poll: I'll return to post #297 later, "for I am slow of...

    I'll return to post #297 later, "for I am slow of study"(MND1.2.59). Until then, another indication that the author recommends comparing one play to another is the first line of AS YOU LIKE IT: "As...
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    Poll: One cannot read MEASURE FOR MEASURE more than...

    One cannot read MEASURE FOR MEASURE more than once without comparing Angelo to Antonio in MV. Therefore, some in Shakespeare's audience might have noted that the Queen's mother, Ann Boleyn, was...
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    Poll: Another puzzle is that while C.G. Jung's book...

    Another puzzle is that while C.G. Jung's book MEMORIES, DREAMS, REFLECTIONS is interesting to compare to Sh, I have yet to find any mention of Sh in it. This is in contrast with Dr. Freud's comments,...
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    Poll: Montague and Capulet are, like Shylock and...

    Montague and Capulet are, like Shylock and Antonio, in serious danger: "Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word / By thee, old Capulet, and Montague..........If ever you disturb our streets again /...
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    Poll: Well, thanks are in order to Danik, Professor...

    Well, thanks are in order to Danik, Professor Drakakis and Mr. Yesno(post#79) for leading one to note that Shylock the Jew's line, "I stand here for law"(MV4.1.144), echoes lines from Montague, a...
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    Poll: Salerio delivers a letter from Antonio to...

    Salerio delivers a letter from Antonio to Bassanio regarding the bond and adds: "Never did I know / A creature that did bear the shape of man / So keen and greedy to confound a man"(MV3.2.280-2). ...
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    Poll: Professor N. Holland, for the Signet edition of...

    Professor N. Holland, for the Signet edition of HENRY IV, PART TWO, wrote that the epilogue is "mingled," that is, two epilogues in one. Professor Shapiro, in his fine book CONTESTED WILL, tells us...
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    Poll: In R&J, Capulet, Juliet's father, has three lines...

    In R&J, Capulet, Juliet's father, has three lines in the first scene of the play. The second scene begins with him speaking to Count Paris: "But Montague is bound as well as I"(R&J1.2.1). In Act...
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    Poll: Sonnet 148 begins: "O me, what eyes hath love...

    Sonnet 148 begins: "O me, what eyes hath love put in my head, / which have no correspondence with true sight. / Or if they have, where is my judgment fled, / That censures falsely what they see...
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    Poll: Antonio's line, "Well, jailer, on. Pray God...

    Antonio's line, "Well, jailer, on. Pray God Bassanio come / To see me pay his debt, and then I care not"(MV3.3.35-6) is interesting. He knows full well that if Bassanio comes to Venice that Portia...
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    Poll: In post #207 we noted that Antonio's "These...

    In post #207 we noted that Antonio's "These griefs and losses"(MV3.3.32) echoes Morocco's "Portia, adieu. "I have too grieved a heart / To take a tedious leave. Thus losers part"(MV2.7.76-7). ...
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    Poll: Then again, according to Bate, Portia has 22% of...

    Then again, according to Bate, Portia has 22% of the lines in the play and Shylock and Bassanio each has 13%. So, Antonio's sadness may be(as we noted in post #218) due to his losing Portia to...
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    Poll: This recalls a line from HAMLET: "For this...

    This recalls a line from HAMLET: "For this relief much thanks"(HAM1.1.5). The ghost of Hamlet's father has appeared on the platform. And Professor Leggatt wrote, for the Folger edition, that...
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    Poll: "Mark you this, Bassanio, / The devil can site...

    "Mark you this, Bassanio, / The devil can site Scripture for his purpose"(MV1.3.96-7), says Antonio. Lancelet begins Act 3, scene 5: "Yes truly, for look you, the sins of the father are to be laid...
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    Poll: The first scene in AS YOU LIKE IT ends with a...

    The first scene in AS YOU LIKE IT ends with a speech from Oliver, Orlando's brother, where we find: "I hope I shall see an end of him; for my soul, yet I know not why, hates nothing more than...
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