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    Poll: Montague and Capulet are, like Shylock and...

    Montague and Capulet are, like Shylock and Antonio, in serious danger: "Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word / By thee, old Capulet, and Montague..........If ever you disturb our streets again /...
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    Poll: Well, thanks are in order to Danik, Professor...

    Well, thanks are in order to Danik, Professor Drakakis and Mr. Yesno(post#79) for leading one to note that Shylock the Jew's line, "I stand here for law"(MV4.1.144), echoes lines from Montague, a...
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    Poll: Salerio delivers a letter from Antonio to...

    Salerio delivers a letter from Antonio to Bassanio regarding the bond and adds: "Never did I know / A creature that did bear the shape of man / So keen and greedy to confound a man"(MV3.2.280-2). ...
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    Poll: Professor N. Holland, for the Signet edition of...

    Professor N. Holland, for the Signet edition of HENRY IV, PART TWO, wrote that the epilogue is "mingled," that is, two epilogues in one. Professor Shapiro, in his fine book CONTESTED WILL, tells us...
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    Poll: In R&J, Capulet, Juliet's father, has three lines...

    In R&J, Capulet, Juliet's father, has three lines in the first scene of the play. The second scene begins with him speaking to Count Paris: "But Montague is bound as well as I"(R&J1.2.1). In Act...
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    Poll: Sonnet 148 begins: "O me, what eyes hath love...

    Sonnet 148 begins: "O me, what eyes hath love put in my head, / which have no correspondence with true sight. / Or if they have, where is my judgment fled, / That censures falsely what they see...
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    Poll: Antonio's line, "Well, jailer, on. Pray God...

    Antonio's line, "Well, jailer, on. Pray God Bassanio come / To see me pay his debt, and then I care not"(MV3.3.35-6) is interesting. He knows full well that if Bassanio comes to Venice that Portia...
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    Poll: In post #207 we noted that Antonio's "These...

    In post #207 we noted that Antonio's "These griefs and losses"(MV3.3.32) echoes Morocco's "Portia, adieu. "I have too grieved a heart / To take a tedious leave. Thus losers part"(MV2.7.76-7). ...
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    Poll: Then again, according to Bate, Portia has 22% of...

    Then again, according to Bate, Portia has 22% of the lines in the play and Shylock and Bassanio each has 13%. So, Antonio's sadness may be(as we noted in post #218) due to his losing Portia to...
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    Poll: This recalls a line from HAMLET: "For this...

    This recalls a line from HAMLET: "For this relief much thanks"(HAM1.1.5). The ghost of Hamlet's father has appeared on the platform. And Professor Leggatt wrote, for the Folger edition, that...
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    Poll: "Mark you this, Bassanio, / The devil can site...

    "Mark you this, Bassanio, / The devil can site Scripture for his purpose"(MV1.3.96-7), says Antonio. Lancelet begins Act 3, scene 5: "Yes truly, for look you, the sins of the father are to be laid...
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    Poll: The first scene in AS YOU LIKE IT ends with a...

    The first scene in AS YOU LIKE IT ends with a speech from Oliver, Orlando's brother, where we find: "I hope I shall see an end of him; for my soul, yet I know not why, hates nothing more than...
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    Poll: Antonio's "The weakest kind of fruit / Drops...

    Antonio's "The weakest kind of fruit / Drops earliest to the ground, and so let me"(MV4.1.115-16) echoes Mercutio: "Now will he sit under a medlar tree / And wish his mistress were that kind of...
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    Poll: Bevington's introduction to A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S...

    Bevington's introduction to A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM is interesting. As we have seen, Shylock's reply to Portia's "The quality of mercy" speech echoes a line from Egeus: I beg the law, the law,...
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    Poll: The "melancholy Jaques"(AS YOU LIKE IT2.1.26),...

    The "melancholy Jaques"(AS YOU LIKE IT2.1.26), echoes Antonio's "I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano, / A stage where everyman must play a part, / And mine a sad one"(MV1.1.77): "All the...
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    Poll: Professor Bevington's introduction attests to the...

    Professor Bevington's introduction attests to the wide range of subject matter in the play. When we encounter the terms "romantic comedy," we should study what they mean. What is essential, though,...
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    Poll: Indeed, and the first lines in R&J read: "Two...

    Indeed, and the first lines in R&J read: "Two households, both alike in dignity, / In fair Verona, where we lay our scene / From ancient grudge break to new mutiny"(ROM1.1). Shylock's "I will feed...
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    Poll: And Shylock's "But more"(MV1.3.40) recalls...

    And Shylock's "But more"(MV1.3.40) recalls Romeo's "Here's much to do with hate, but more with love"(ROM1.1.174). Therefore, one might regard Orsino's speech that begins TWELFTH NIGHT as Shakespeare...
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    Poll: The aside from Shylock in Act 1, scene 3 is often...

    The aside from Shylock in Act 1, scene 3 is often noted as problematic. If one notes the original context of the play, that is, it follows ROMEO AND JULIET, Shylock's "I hate him for he is a...
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    Poll: And there is a character named Antonio in...

    And there is a character named Antonio in TWELFTH NIGHT. It then is a straight forward matter to "read back literally"(see#269 above) and identify the Antonio in MV with Sonnet 144.
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    Poll: The first lines in TWELFTH NIGHT are spoken by...

    The first lines in TWELFTH NIGHT are spoken by Orsino, whom Professor Bate tells us is "the conventional Elizabethan sonneteer." Therefore, one might suggest that the author is inviting us to...
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    Poll: Hamlet's "purpose of playing" speech is early in...

    Hamlet's "purpose of playing" speech is early in Act 3, scene 2 of HAMLET. Returning to Professor Gross's suggestion, "Shylock is Shakespeare," we might note again Professor Bate's comment, "the...
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    Poll: Gratiano's line: "Let me play the fool"(1.1.82),...

    Gratiano's line: "Let me play the fool"(1.1.82), echos Nick Bottom: "An I may hide my face, let me play Thisby too"(DREAM1.2.45) and "Let me play the lion too: I will roar that I will do any man's...
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    Poll: As writer C.J. Box might say: "maybe." We have...

    As writer C.J. Box might say: "maybe." We have yet another conundrum. In the first scene, Gratiano says: "Let me play the fool"(1.1.82). The intentions of the clownish fool are often uncertain: ...
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    Poll: Professor Bate also wrote: "Shakespeare often...

    Professor Bate also wrote: "Shakespeare often returned to a triangular structure of relationships in which close male friendship is placed at odds with desire for a woman. The pattern recurs not...
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