YouTube music videos

  1. Emil Miller
    Emil Miller
    I am posting this as a test item having lost the original posting bos on the music discussion group.
  2. andave_ya
    andave_ya
    great idea . Here's what I'm listening to now: Renee Fleming. It may be Puccini, but, I really love this piece .
  3. stlukesguild
    stlukesguild
    And what is wrong with Puccini?
  4. andave_ya
    andave_ya


    Most complain that he is played far more often than his talent warrants.
  5. stlukesguild
    stlukesguild
    Hard-core Modernists dismiss him (along with Rachmaninoff, Copeland, Delius, Vaughan-Williams, Virgil Thompson, etc...) as being anachronisms... continuing within the late Romantic strain when everyone who knows music knows that we've moved on to the muscularity of Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and Schoenberg. 100 years after Modernism there is a lot of re-evaluation taking place and the notion of a single true strain or direction of art is being rejected for one that is far more pluralistic. It is possible to love the Rite of Spring AND Madame Butterfly. I must begin to question the negative views of Puccini (Rachmaninoff, Copeland, etc...) in comparison to Stravinsky and Schoenberg when we are still listening to these composers with pleasure 100 years after the fact... while Stravinsky's reputation almost rests entirely upon the Rite, Petruschka, and the Firebird (early works all) and Schoenberg is perhaps the biggest name composer who no one ever listens to (Although I will admit I like his early work as well). I will admit, however, that music being such a sensual/sensory experience I find it difficult to listen to music that is perhaps "expressive"... but "ugly-sounding". If that is my prejudice, so be it. I am still more than familiar and fond of modern music... I just have little use for the atonal serial approach.
  6. andave_ya
    andave_ya
    As a fairly inexperienced classical music/opera fan, I find Puccini a lot more approachable than most modern classical.

    I'd really appreciate some informed opinions on this performer: Caravanserai by Loreena McKennitt. It's considered world/fusion/folk.
  7. stlukesguild
    stlukesguild
    Yes... definitely not classical. A fusion of Celtic and Middle-Eastern with New Age and Western pop. Her voice is lovely enough... delicate... to the point that I find her somewhat overpowered by the drums and bass... but I guess the producers imagine that such is the only manner to assure an mass audience raised on pop music. I'm actually quite fond of traditional Celtic and Middle-Eastern music... as well as American Bluegrass. If you like Celtic music you may wish to check out Altan... (beware of the few seconds of commercial at the start)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpKkBe8kZ00

    as well as the solo efforts by group member Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ph7rm2YAx9k

    and I'm especially fond of this Carter Family classic performed by Mairéad along with Canadian (JBI!!) bluegrass/country performer Michelle Wright and the fabulous American folk singer, Iris DeMent:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RIn-ov1yJM

    The group (Altan) were educated upon the traditional Irish music of the regional County Donegal. The Chieftains are another near-legendary Celtic group. They are strongest on their earlier albums (I recommend Chieftains 7 and Chieftains 8) before they began continually employing pop stars such as Mick Jagger, Roger Daltry, etc... on their records... although this performance with contemporary American Bluegrass songstress Alison Krauss of an ancient and tragic Celtic lament is especially moving:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOpY0wQdJ5w

    Another marvelous album is The Girls Won't Leave the Boys Alone by Cherish the Ladies who employ the talents of a good number of the real legends of Irish music:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHKLu656qUE

    Middle-Eastern music has certain similarities with Celtic... as well as medieval music. It is commonly rooted in modes which creates a droning hypnotic sound. A modal approach has actually become quite common among contemporary classical composers who often build upon medieval music as well as Middle-Eastern and other traditional folk music and even jazz. Among the most acclaimed traditional Middle-Eastern ensembles are Hossein Alizadeh and Djivan Gasparyan...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHtuaIN2EhE

    Zakir Hussain, and Kayhan Kalhor... who with Indian sitarist Shujaat Khan, and Indian tabla player, Swapan Chaudhuri, formed a musical group known as Ghazal who performed work that merged classical and folk traditions of India, Pakistan, and Persia:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKp4zlQ_1NY

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0_RDxXZqKQ

    One of the most intriguing is Anouar Brahem a French Tuniasian who often performs with pianist Francois Couturier creating a music that is a marvelous merger of Middle-Eastern, French folk and classical traditions (especially Erik Satie) and jazz:





    His music... and other similar cross-pollinations are among the current leading trends in classical music... although there are still the academic purists... in both the Minimalist and Serial traditions that bristle at such an idea... in spite of the fact that Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Liszt, Stravinsky, Bartok... and any number of other classical masters built upon folk traditions of various nations and cultures.
  8. stlukesguild
    stlukesguild
    Yes... definitely not classical. A fusion of Celtic and Middle-Eastern with New Age and Western pop. Her voice is lovely enough... delicate... to the point that I find her somewhat overpowered by the drums and bass... but I guess the producers imagine that such is the only manner to assure an mass audience raised on pop music. I'm actually quite fond of traditional Celtic and Middle-Eastern music... as well as American Bluegrass. If you like Celtic music you may wish to check out Altan... (beware of the few seconds of commercial at the start)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpKkBe8kZ00

    as well as the solo efforts by group member Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ph7rm2YAx9k

    and I'm especially fond of this Carter Family classic performed by Mairéad along with Canadian (JBI!!) bluegrass/country performer Michelle Wright and the fabulous American folk singer, Iris DeMent:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RIn-ov1yJM

    The group (Altan) were educated upon the traditional Irish music of the regional County Donegal. The Chieftains are another near-legendary Celtic group. They are strongest on their earlier albums (I recommend Chieftains 7 and Chieftains 8) before they began continually employing pop stars such as Mick Jagger, Roger Daltry, etc... on their records... although this performance with contemporary American Bluegrass songstress Alison Krauss of an ancient and tragic Celtic lament is especially moving:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOpY0wQdJ5w

    Another marvelous album is The Girls Won't Leave the Boys Alone by Cherish the Ladies who employ the talents of a good number of the real legends of Irish music:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHKLu656qUE

    Middle-Eastern music has certain similarities with Celtic... as well as medieval music. It is commonly rooted in modes which creates a droning hypnotic sound. A modal approach has actually become quite common among contemporary classical composers who often build upon medieval music as well as Middle-Eastern and other traditional folk music and even jazz. Among the most acclaimed traditional Middle-Eastern ensembles are Hossein Alizadeh and Djivan Gasparyan...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHtuaIN2EhE

    Zakir Hussain, and Kayhan Kalhor... who with Indian sitarist Shujaat Khan, and Indian tabla player, Swapan Chaudhuri, formed a musical group known as Ghazal who performed work that merged classical and folk traditions of India, Pakistan, and Persia:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKp4zlQ_1NY

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0_RDxXZqKQ

    One of the most intriguing is Anouar Brahem a French Tuniasian who often performs with pianist Francois Couturier creating a music that is a marvelous merger of Middle-Eastern, French folk and classical traditions (especially Erik Satie) and jazz:





    His music... and other similar cross-pollinations are among the current leading trends in classical music... although there are still the academic purists... in both the Minimalist and Serial traditions that bristle at such an idea... in spite of the fact that Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Liszt, Stravinsky, Bartok... and any number of other classical masters built upon folk traditions of various nations and cultures.
  9. stlukesguild
    stlukesguild
    For some reason the site is acting quirky. It deleted the two links to the last artist, double posted, and will not allow me to edit.

    Anyway... here are the links to Anouar Brahem:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ff_qwu57hok

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_q5JuleA4E
  10. Petrarch's Love
    Petrarch's Love
    Thanks for all those links, St. Luke's. Some of those groups I hadn't heard before, especially Hossein Alizadeh and Djivan Gasparyan. What country(s) in the middle east are they and/or their music from?
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