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farnoosh

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My grandma has been in the hospital for about a week now, it's nothing terrible but she need antibiotics injected in her veins and she needs to be constantly monitored for that. Since I'm technically without a job to do at the moment (unless you call waiting for an admission email a job), I go to the hospital in the mornings and take care of her and check up to see if she needs anything: CT scans and etc. Anyway, mostly there isn't much to do around there so I take my kindle with me and read my books.
The thing is lately I cant seem to finish anything. I've started Middlemarch by George Elliot about 4 months ago and I can't seem to continue reading it, same goes for Tess of the D'Urbervilles and Les Miserables. I love these kind of books and although I know however uninteresting the story might start it can have a really interesting storyline, I just can't seem to find it in me right now to keep reading them. What's going on with me??
For instance, I've been wanting to read Les Miserables since forever and I kept telling myself that after graduation I'm gonna finally pick it up and read it. Well I did do it, but I've sort of lost interest in it after reading the first few chapters. I keep asking myself when is Jean Valjean going to appear??
I find these old classics a very challenging read for me. Maybe it's because I've never really studied the English language and after all it's not my native language, but I still love to read them even if it means sitting with an oxford dictionary next to me and reading with a speed of 1 page per hour. I seriously have no idea where did my energy go that now I'm not even able to read a single paragraph without sighing after every phrase. *Que a confused smilie*
By the way, does Lit-Net have a group on Goodreads? I really like these kind of literature related sites. It's also fun to post your favorite quote in a book you're reading and rate it for others to see including your friends after you've finished the book. I find people's comments highly entertaining- sometimes even more than the book that they've commented on.
Anyway, if anyone here is on Goodreads feel free to add me as a friend:
www.goodreads.com/Fazii

Updated 02-14-2015 at 12:44 PM by farnoosh

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  1. NikolaiI's Avatar
    That's pretty normal, I think. What's more, it's a good thing. . or it usually has been for me; those are the times when there's peace, and you have time. I went looking for a quote of Whitman's, a poem actually, something about leaving books behind, and going out and living the open road and traveling; I couldn't find it, but speaking of Goodreads, I came by a couple interesting ones.

    “Keep your face always toward the sunshine - and shadows will fall behind you.”
    ― Walt Whitman

    “Peace is always beautiful.”
    ― Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

    “This is what you shall do; Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.”
    ― Walt Whitman

    [url]https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/1438.Walt_Whitman[/url]


    I think what I'm saying is it sounds like you're at peace :)

    I recognize the feeling you're describing - for me, that's actually one of the nicest times of life. . of course it's a step along the journey, but it also seems close to when Rumi says "there, the world is to full to talk about."

    Also, there is a very interesting thought Schopenhauer came up with. Very shocking when I first read it! I didn't want to think about it as possibly being true because, I had always been brought up to believe in the virtues of reading - and those are all still there; but I've gradually come to understand it's true. It's from the essay "On Thinking for Yourself" - a similar idea is definitely expressed in Whitman's poem, the one I can't find. Anyway - it definitely reaffirms my belief in the idea of selectivity - there are some works which contain a thousand worlds of beauty, and to find those and read them will still take a lifetime, so why would I spend time on anything less? :p This way of looking at it would just seem to say that you just need to find more interesting books - again in the words of Rumi, "let yourself be drawn by the stronger pull of that which you truly love."

    I found a poem by Whitman - not the one I was thinking of, but similar,

    [url]http://www.bartleby.com/142/82.html[/url]
    (from [url=http://www.bartleby.com/142/index2.html]here[/url])


    “When we read, another person thinks for us: we merely repeat his mental process. In learning to write, the pupil goes over with his pen what the teacher has outlined in pencil: so in reading; the greater part of the work of thought is already done for us. This is why it relieves us to take up a book after being occupied with our own thoughts. And in reading, the mind is, in fact, only the playground of another’s thoughts. So it comes about that if anyone spends almost the whole day in reading, and by way of relaxation devotes the intervals to some thoughtless pastime, he gradually loses the capacity for thinking; just as the man who always rides, at last forgets how to walk.”
    (the Schopenhauer quote)

    Or Socrates:
    'The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.'

    Just some thoughts - like I say, it's a feeling I recognize, and I realize today it's actually a very nice thing - or at least, I remember it as such.

    Or another way,

    “You are an explorer, and you represent our species, and the greatest good you can do is to bring back a new idea, because our world is endangered by the absence of good ideas. Our world is in crisis because of the absence of consciousness.”
    ― Terence McKenna

    Enjoy :-)
    I hope you grandmother recovers nicely.
  2. Virgil's Avatar
    Oh you should go back to Les Misarbles. I'm reading a volume each year. I can't read the whole 1400 pages in one year. There are five volumes, each one is almost a novel in itself. I read the first last year and will start the second in another month or so. Jean Valjean comes in mid way through that first volume. I remember the beginning as rather philosophical, but that changes soon. It really gets better. Perhaps your problem is reading off a Kindle. I have trouble with long works off a Kindle. I need to be able to go back to things and it's very hard off a Kindle.
  3. farnoosh's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Virgil
    Oh you should go back to Les Misarbles. I'm reading a volume each year. I can't read the whole 1400 pages in one year. There are five volumes, each one is almost a novel in itself. I read the first last year and will start the second in another month or so. Jean Valjean comes in mid way through that first volume. I remember the beginning as rather philosophical, but that changes soon. It really gets better. Perhaps your problem is reading off a Kindle. I have trouble with long works off a Kindle. I need to be able to go back to things and it's very hard off a Kindle.
    Yeah I guess you're right. Les Miserables is not the type of book that you can read off a Kindle.
    P.S I seriously did not know there were 5 volumes!! As it is all stored in one PDF file... wow!! I've got some serious reading to do