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Unregistered
05-24-2005, 07:07 PM
This book was very boring to read. There kept on being talking and talking which I hated very. Emma really annoys me, it seems like she knows everything, she's only 21! But anyway again it was very boring and if you are the kind of person who likes to read meaning and In-depth literature books, this ones for you.

knightley
01-13-2006, 04:02 PM
Hi, i was just wondering if you have actually read the book. For a first Emma is 20 not 21 which it tells you on the very first page. Also I don't know whether you are familar with Jane Austen's work but Emma is extremely narritrive in comparision. There is a great deal of narrative from an omniscient narrator and is considered to be Ms Austen's maturist novel, in comparison to P&P which involves a great deal of conversation Emma had very little in it's text.

Xamonas Chegwe
01-13-2006, 04:11 PM
But anyway again it was very boring and if you are the kind of person who likes to read meaning and In-depth literature books, this ones for you.

If you're that kind of person, this whole forum's for you! That's why it's called "The Literature Network" and not "The Easy Book Network".

shortysweetp
01-13-2006, 09:02 PM
lol soooo true.

Stanislaw
01-18-2006, 06:00 PM
If you're that kind of person, this whole forum's for you! That's why it's called "The Literature Network" and not "The Easy Book Network".

Damn!, where is that forum. :D

Xamonas Chegwe
01-18-2006, 06:11 PM
Damn!, where is that forum. :D

"www.iamverygullible.com"

samercury
02-05-2006, 08:42 PM
"www.iamverygullible.com"
it doesn't work :confused:...

malwethien
02-22-2006, 03:59 AM
HAHAHA very funny thread :D

But seriously though...Could someone please tell me if the middle part of this book becomes more interesting? I've attempted to read it twice, but twice I stopped because I found it quite boring. And I love Jane Austen...which is why I made myself try again after failing the first time...but I just can't seem to go on......

This IS a good book, right? I think I need someone to convince me that reading this will be worth my while.

earthchild
02-22-2006, 07:28 PM
Hi, i was just wondering if you have actually read the book. For a first Emma is 20 not 21 which it tells you on the very first page. Also I don't know whether you are familar with Jane Austen's work but Emma is extremely narritrive in comparision. There is a great deal of narrative from an omniscient narrator and is considered to be Ms Austen's maturist novel, in comparison to P&P which involves a great deal of conversation Emma had very little in it's text.

I second this...I, personally, found this to be an interesting read. Because of the in depth descriptions of the character's persons the length was, agreed, longer than that of other novels by Austen. I find it hard to understand why someone would chose to pick up a such novel in whose length they where displeased...

Flora
02-26-2006, 09:06 AM
HAHAHA very funny thread :D

But seriously though...Could someone please tell me if the middle part of this book becomes more interesting? I've attempted to read it twice, but twice I stopped because I found it quite boring. And I love Jane Austen...which is why I made myself try again after failing the first time...but I just can't seem to go on......

This IS a good book, right? I think I need someone to convince me that reading this will be worth my while.


Well, In my opinion, it definetly is worth reading, if not for any other reason, becouse it's a classic... Thogh it's true that Jane Austen's novels arent really that books you read very fast, it's a lot of conversationes and feelings and that, so it might not be that fun to read...
There's no part that really 'becomes interesting,' the story is just...going on...

The Unnamable
02-26-2006, 10:54 AM
But seriously though...Could someone please tell me if the middle part of this book becomes more interesting?
You wait ‘til Frank Churchill goes all the way to London to get his hair cut! Ah, but does he? :lol:


I've attempted to read it twice, but twice I stopped because I found it quite boring. And I love Jane Austen...
Why did you find it boring and what is it about Jane Austen that you love?


This IS a good book, right? I think I need someone to convince me that reading this will be worth my while.
It’s even better than Pride and Prejudice – subtler and less fizzy. I think you need to be a certain age to enjoy it though. Wait a few years – it’ll still be there.

malwethien
02-27-2006, 11:04 PM
Pride and Prejudice[/I] – subtler and less fizzy. I think you need to be a certain age to enjoy it though. Wait a few years – it’ll still be there.


Well I don't know what it is about Jane Austen that I love...her wit and sarcasm? The way she makes fun of society of her time?

I guess Emma just didn't grab my attention in the beginning...

what do you mean by "wait a few years?" How old should I be to appreciate this novel?

The Unnamable
03-05-2006, 11:16 AM
Well I don't know what it is about Jane Austen that I love...her wit and sarcasm? The way she makes fun of society of her time?

I guess Emma just didn't grab my attention in the beginning...

what do you mean by "wait a few years?" How old should I be to appreciate this novel?
Emma is much subtler than Pride and Prejudice. I was about 21 before I could see why it’s better. Obviously this is subjective but the characterisation is more assured and the sexual tension between Emma and Mr. Knightley is every bit as good as that between Darcy and Elizabeth. For me, Knightley is a more interesting character than Darcy. Emma is certainly far more developed a character than Elizabeth. I also find her far sexier.

The wit and sarcasm are in plentiful supply in Emma. Perhaps because Emma herself is a less immediately likeable character than Lizzie, there is more of the endearing spitefulness in this book. Emma’s pretty, empty-headed little friend, Harriet Smith, is nice enough, God bless her, but she’s none too bright. Emma tries to get her married off to Mr. Elton. The confusions are amusing and when Emma assumes Mr. Elton is referring to Harriet in a line from a riddle he has supplied, she responds to the line “Thy ready wit the world will soon apply”, she reacts by saying:

“Humph – Harriet’s ready wit! All the better. A man must be very much in love indeed, to describe her so.”

This idea of love runs all the way through Austen’s novels. I love the fact that she isn’t at all romantic. But what I really like here is that, even though Emma has got it wrong, she’s right about Harriet – she’s no wit. She's also right about Elton. Elton’s feelings about Emma are no more based in any genuine apprehension of worth (other than financial) than are those she supposes he feels for Harriet.

“"Never mind, Harriet, I shall not be a poor old maid; and it is poverty only which makes celibacy contemptible to a generous public! A single woman, with a very narrow income, must be a ridiculous, disagreeable old maid! the proper sport of boys and girls, but a single woman, of good fortune, is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as any body else. And the distinction is not quite so much against the candour and common sense of the world as appears at first; for a very narrow income has a tendency to contract the mind, and sour the temper. Those who can barely live, and who live perforce in a very small, and generally very inferior, society, may well be illiberal and cross. This does not apply, however, to Miss Bates; she is only too good natured and too silly to suit me; but, in general, she is very much to the taste of every body, though single and though poor. Poverty certainly has not contracted her mind: I really believe, if she had only a shilling in the world, she would be very likely to give away sixpence of it; and nobody is afraid of her: that is a great charm."”

For the truth of this last comment of Emma’s, think of the users this forum and the opinions they have of one another. :D

Wild Apple
03-06-2006, 08:24 PM
Emma is much subtler than Pride and Prejudice. "I really believe, if she had only a shilling in the world, she would be very likely to give away sixpence of it; and nobody is afraid of her: that is a great charm."”

For the truth of this last comment of Emma’s, think of the users this forum and the opinions they have of one another. :D

How some people think of one another on this forum might also be summed up with a different scene, also one where Emma interacts with Miss Bates.

"Oh! very well," exclaimed Miss Bates, "then I need not be uneasy. `Three things very dull indeed.' That will just do for me, you know. I shall be sure to say three dull things as soon as ever I open my mouth, shan't I? (looking round with the most good-humoured dependence on every body's assent)--Do not you all think I shall?"

Emma could not resist.

"Ah! ma'am, but there may be a difficulty. Pardon me--but you will be limited as to number--only three at once."

Virgil
11-28-2006, 12:32 PM
Emma is much subtler than Pride and Prejudice. I was about 21 before I could see why it’s better. Obviously this is subjective but the characterisation is more assured and the sexual tension between Emma and Mr. Knightley is every bit as good as that between Darcy and Elizabeth. For me, Knightley is a more interesting character than Darcy. Emma is certainly far more developed a character than Elizabeth. I also find her far sexier.

The wit and sarcasm are in plentiful supply in Emma. Perhaps because Emma herself is a less immediately likeable character than Lizzie, there is more of the endearing spitefulness in this book. Emma’s pretty, empty-headed little friend, Harriet Smith, is nice enough, God bless her, but she’s none too bright. Emma tries to get her married off to Mr. Elton. The confusions are amusing and when Emma assumes Mr. Elton is referring to Harriet in a line from a riddle he has supplied, she responds to the line “Thy ready wit the world will soon apply”, she reacts by saying:

“Humph – Harriet’s ready wit! All the better. A man must be very much in love indeed, to describe her so.”


Having recently read Emma I pretty much agree with Unnamable. It is better than Pride and Prejudice. For those reasons and others. The one I would say here is Emma's absolutely perfect plotting. It is put together like a classical symphony.

You may be gone, Unnamable, but you're not forgotten.

Niamh
11-29-2006, 07:42 PM
HAHAHA very funny thread :D

But seriously though...Could someone please tell me if the middle part of this book becomes more interesting? I've attempted to read it twice, but twice I stopped because I found it quite boring. And I love Jane Austen...which is why I made myself try again after failing the first time...but I just can't seem to go on......

This IS a good book, right? I think I need someone to convince me that reading this will be worth my while.

No it doesnt get any better. I also found it quite boring and i'm a fan of Jane Austen. Much prefare Persuasion.:)

Cat II
12-03-2006, 04:11 PM
:thumbs_up I absolutely love Jane Austin! Emma may start slowly, but as the characters develop, you will find yourself caring more and more about what happens to each in the end. In the beginning of the book Emma is a spoilt brat who doesn't deserve the time of day...........but she evolves! Poor Harriet floats along, her head turned by any encouragement of Emma. Will she ever realize her true love was standing before her the entire time?
What will happen to Mr. Knightley (in my view the most interesting male character in the book).
Now that I think of it, the book Emma is a soap opera of the 1800's. I don't watch, or even like soap opera's but I do like this book.
Keep trying..........I think you'll be glad you did. And if not, you will have read it and will be able to give a true opinion of the book. :yawnb:

Matrim Cuathon
02-12-2007, 08:28 AM
i read it when i was in 4th grade and i still would totally disagree with the original comment. now that i am older i understand it much better of course, but that just makes me think that the unregistered person is really very ignorant.

NotWoodhouse
05-25-2007, 06:34 PM
i read it when i was in 4th grade and i still would totally disagree with the original comment. now that i am older i understand it much better of course, but that just makes me think that the unregistered person is really very ignorant.

I must agree. I found Emma fasinating. However, I do understand that is not "everyone's cup of tea".

sybilline
06-02-2007, 08:02 AM
I read "Emma" quite a long time ago, and I can't remember the story. But in my opinion, it is worth trying to read it as Jane Austen has a sharp insight on men's human nature. I still remind of the end of the novel that made clear to me that we are not always conscious of the nature of feelings we experience towards others. And it may be very harmful.

Behemoth
06-18-2007, 01:18 PM
I'm reading Emma at the moment and, whilst i'm finding it more of a challenge than some of her other works, and slower paced, Austen's wit and subtlety is superb. I'm hoping the 'action' will pick up a little more the further I read, particularly anything relative to Mr Knightley :D

Sir Bartholomew
07-02-2007, 09:58 PM
it's better reading it the second time when we all know what's going on and Emma's oblivious pretense and superiority. imagine the scene where Emma gossips with Frank about Jane Fairfax's flee from the Campbells and Mr Dixon. Frank then turns grave and acts nonsense (according to Emma). this is a great book because it appears into something different in sebsequent readings. please ignore its "lack" of plot and its EXCEEDINGLY UNBEARABLE TEDIOUS LENGTH.